Lexicon of Sustainability: Fishing after Katrina

Small town businesses are starved for capital, no rx but small town people continue to bank and invest their money with corporate behemoths based on Wall Street. What if we could change investing from a gamble in the stock market into a local development tool? Local investing is the answer.

If small towns could redirect even a tiny percentage of funds invested outside their town, page they could change the face of their town. And many towns already have.

Michael Shuman has written your guide, order Local Dollars, Local Sense.

Shuman has a long history of activism for local business. His book is an activist’s guide to remaking your town.

Several months ago, I interviewed Amy Cortese, the author of Locavesting. She is a journalist and writer. Her book is more of the consumer version than the activist.

Both books are useful. In fact, Cortese and Shuman shared early manuscripts with each other to reduce overlapping examples and to make the books complement each other. And I predict you’re going to be hearing a lot more about local investing from both authors over the coming years. Watch for them at conferences and events.

Local Dollars, Local Sense and Locavesting are both required reading for everyone in small town or rural economic development today. Local investing is that important. 

Small business owners looking for alternative financing will find descriptions of many different tools that can work: community ownership, cooperatives, royalty financing, CDFIs, and more.

Read more at Small Biz Survival
Architectural historian Ruth Little of Raleigh recently completed an inventory of over 600 historic buildings and other historic sites in Carteret County. These are structures located outside the towns of Beaufort and Morehead City which have previously been studied.

Carteret County is one of the last in North Carolina to receive a comprehensive inventory of its historic resources. The project was sponsored by the State Historic Preservation Office, viagra
a section within the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. Cindi Hamilton, approved
director of the Carteret County Historical Society, help
was the local project coordinator.

 Ms. Little compiled photos, site plans, architectural analysis, mapping, oral history, and research on each of the historic resources in order to compile a record of the county’s heritage of historic properties.  

“Carteret County has a wealth of historic buildings that deserve to be recognized. It will be a joy to give present my understanding of the county’s architecture to the people of Carteret, many of whom shared their stories with me when I knocked on their doors.” historian Ruth Little announced.

The inventory will assist local agencies in the preservation and recognition of these houses, churches, stores, and other types of buildings.  As part of the survey project twenty-five properties and two historic districts (the Atlantic Historic District and the Newport Historic District) were recently placed on the state’s list of properties that appear to be eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Ms. Little will give a visual presentation of her findings on Monday, March 19 at 7:00 pm at the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center on Harkers Island. Residents from all of Carteret County are encouraged to attend.
In my post, look
College has been oversold, tadalafil  I discussed the 40% college dropout rate. In a piece in this week’s Chronicle of Higher Education, about it
Tuning in to the Dropping Out, I reprise some of this material but also discuss high school dropouts and the importance of alternative education paths.

In the 21st century, an astounding 25 percent of American men do not graduate from high school. A big part of the problem is that the United States has paved a single road to knowledge, the road through the classroom. “Sit down, stay quiet, and absorb. Do this for 12 to 16 years,” we tell the students, “and all will be well.” Lots of students, however, crash before they reach the end of the road. Who can blame them? Sit-down learning is not for everyone, perhaps not even for most people. There are many roads to an education.

Consider those offered in Europe. In Germany, 97 percent of students graduate from high school, but only a third of these students go on to college. In the United States, we graduate fewer students from high school, but nearly two-thirds of those we graduate go to college. So are German students poorly educated? Not at all.

Instead of college, German students enter training and apprenticeship programs—many of which begin during high school. By the time they finish, they have had a far better practical education than most American students—equivalent to an American technical degree—and, as a result, they have an easier time entering the work force. Similarly, in Austria, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland, between 40 to 70 percent of students opt for an educational program that combines classroom and workplace learning.

…In the United States, “vocational” programs are often thought of as programs for at-risk students, but that’s because they are taught in high schools with little connection to real workplaces. European programs are typically rigorous because the training is paid for by employers who consider apprentices an important part of their current and future work force. Apprentices are therefore given high-skill technical training that combines theory with practice—and the students are paid! Moreover, instead of isolating teenagers in their own counterculture, apprentice programs introduce teenagers to the adult world and the skills, attitudes, and practices that make for a successful career.

Read more at Marginal Revolution

In my post, buy information pills
College has been oversold, I discussed the 40% college dropout rate. In a piece in this week’s Chronicle of Higher Education, Tuning in to the Dropping Out, I reprise some of this material but also discuss high school dropouts and the importance of alternative education paths.

In the 21st century, an astounding 25 percent of American men do not graduate from high school. A big part of the problem is that the United States has paved a single road to knowledge, the road through the classroom. “Sit down, stay quiet, and absorb. Do this for 12 to 16 years,” we tell the students, “and all will be well.” Lots of students, however, crash before they reach the end of the road. Who can blame them? Sit-down learning is not for everyone, perhaps not even for most people. There are many roads to an education.

Consider those offered in Europe. In Germany, 97 percent of students graduate from high school, but only a third of these students go on to college. In the United States, we graduate fewer students from high school, but nearly two-thirds of those we graduate go to college. So are German students poorly educated? Not at all.

Instead of college, German students enter training and apprenticeship programs—many of which begin during high school. By the time they finish, they have had a far better practical education than most American students—equivalent to an American technical degree—and, as a result, they have an easier time entering the work force. Similarly, in Austria, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland, between 40 to 70 percent of students opt for an educational program that combines classroom and workplace learning.

…In the United States, “vocational” programs are often thought of as programs for at-risk students, but that’s because they are taught in high schools with little connection to real workplaces. European programs are typically rigorous because the training is paid for by employers who consider apprentices an important part of their current and future work force. Apprentices are therefore given high-skill technical training that combines theory with practice—and the students are paid! Moreover, instead of isolating teenagers in their own counterculture, apprentice programs introduce teenagers to the adult world and the skills, attitudes, and practices that make for a successful career.

Read more at Marginal Revolution

We live in a world of dwindling natural resources. The principle of sustainability offers us a road map for managing what we have left. Yet as we attempt to put our world back in balance, malady
we’ve seen the term “sustainability” grossly misused, treatment
its meaning devalued, pharmacy hijacked, turned into hollow sounding marketing jingles.

Instead of tossing the word away, we should take it back and work to redefine what sustainability means.

Peter Gerica is a third generation Gulf Coast fisherman.  When I asked how his crab business survived both Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill, he said, “After Katrina, we lost everything. When I say everything, I mean when we got out of the trees all we had on were our pants and a smile. You just have to keep moving forward.”

His definition of sustainability? “It can be defined as any species, (including Gulf Coast fishermen and Louisiana blue crabs) that withstands the impact of all user groups upon it, maintaining equilibrium throughout its lifecycle.”

What is your definition of sustainability?

(http://grist.org/food/lexicon-of-sustainability-fishing-after-katrina/)

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