Students are winners in the N.C. Farm to School calendar contest

How often have you seen a post like “Our annual Founders Day Beacon Quest will be held on June 5. Sign up now.” ?

Are you assuming that everybody knows what Beacon Quest is? Is it a formal affair? A festive occasion? Is there music or food involved? Is it a family activity? Does it cost anything to participate? Is it public or for members only?
Or how about this: “We just received a fresh shipment of lychee, order rambutan, and mangosteen. Supplies are limited. Get yours today.”
Even one sentence explaining how these are sweet Asian specialty fruit would be helpful and could spark a lot more interest — and probably more sales. (Link to some good online recipes or preparation tips too).
Including a description on an item, a link to more information, or a Wikipedia article on the subject, could also be a good idea.
Often when a business participates in social media, they make the mistake of speaking in terms customers can’t understand. Words and phrases are tossed around, with no definition, and customers may miss an important message or idea you wanted to convey.
For example, in the computer security realm we speak of DDoS, password sniffing, botnets, Trojans, social engineering, backdoors, buffer overflows, dictionary attacks, keystroke loggers, and phishing.
Phrases we use daily could be entirely alien and mysterious to our audience. We can still use them, but not in a stand alone manner. We should attempt to provide a brief definition and possibly an analogy from a more familiar realm.
“A keystroke logger is malware (malicious software) that acts like a spy who watches everything you type on your computer keyboard, in order to steal your passwords and possibly commit identity theft…”
“An algorithm is a set of instructions for obtaining a desired result or initiating a specific action…”
It’s good to use special words, to show your expertise, or to speak with technical accuracy — but it won’t have much impact on customers if you don’t explain what they mean.
You cannot assume that your entire audience comprehends your terminology. It’s better to clarify what a special word or phrase means, so everybody can make sense of what you’re saying.

This way, you accomplish two goals at once. You speak on the higher level of the advanced customers and peers, while you educate the less trained customers and help them grasp what you’re communicating.

Read more at Small Biz Survival
Banking on Youth is an exciting opportunity to showcase your great idea for a venture that directly benefits society. As a young entrepreneur you have so much more than a great idea and the ability to make money—you have the power to make a positive difference! If you are age 13-20, treatment
show us your venture idea through a creative and fun 90-second video and entry form to compete to win one of 33 different $1, viagra
000 seed money prizes provided by our sponsoring banks to bring your idea to life.

Read more at Banking on Youth
Driving across America, purchase
it’s all too easy to lose your mooring amid the commercial thicket of the same old fast-food outlets and big-box stores.

But push on a mile or two beyond the interstate exit, physician
and you may discover a town that’s anchored by a distinctive Main Street—one with grand architecture, eclectic small businesses, and community-oriented features like a park or theater. Often it thrives thanks to locals who have made a conscientious effort to fight the general decline of Main Street.

The work of such activists and preservationists is acknowledged each year by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Great American Main Streets Awards and by the American Planning Association’s Great Places in America: Streets. We scoured their recent designations to select the most vibrant, distinctive downtowns worth the trip.

You’ll find these great Main Streets across the U.S., from mining towns like Silver City, NM, to stately, red-brick Staunton, VA. Yet our list does skew east of the Mississippi, favoring towns that were established before the age of the automobile—and so display the DNA of a pedestrian and bike-friendly environment.

Not that a walkable layout can guarantee a thriving Main Street. Take York, PA, where the 1978 shuttering of the last of four downtown department stores triggered a period of decay. The turnaround was slow going, as landowners aided by various programs renovated nearly every Victorian and Classical Revival façade. Now, on the first Friday of each month, local businesses stay open late, with special events and discounts.

Port Townsend, WA, went through its own reinvention. Expecting a shipping boom, 19th-century residents built out the town in high Victorian style—only to find themselves on the wrong side of Puget Sound when the railroads connected to Seattle. It’s been reborn as an arts center around the main drag, Water Street.

Second chances are just as American as a homespun Main Street, and with the recent economic downturn have come do-it-yourselfers seeing opportunity in cheap abandoned storefronts and converting them into bakeries or boutiques.

So it’s well worth driving the extra few miles to see what Main Street lies ahead. Let us point you in the right direction.

Read more at Travel and Leisure
Driving across America, cure it’s all too easy to lose your mooring amid the commercial thicket of the same old fast-food outlets and big-box stores.

But push on a mile or two beyond the interstate exit, and you may discover a town that’s anchored by a distinctive Main Street—one with grand architecture, eclectic small businesses, and community-oriented features like a park or theater. Often it thrives thanks to locals who have made a conscientious effort to fight the general decline of Main Street.

The work of such activists and preservationists is acknowledged each year by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Great American Main Streets Awards and by the American Planning Association’s Great Places in America: Streets. We scoured their recent designations to select the most vibrant, distinctive downtowns worth the trip.

You’ll find these great Main Streets across the U.S., from mining towns like Silver City, NM, to stately, red-brick Staunton, VA. Yet our list does skew east of the Mississippi, favoring towns that were established before the age of the automobile—and so display the DNA of a pedestrian and bike-friendly environment.

Not that a walkable layout can guarantee a thriving Main Street. Take York, PA, where the 1978 shuttering of the last of four downtown department stores triggered a period of decay. The turnaround was slow going, as landowners aided by various programs renovated nearly every Victorian and Classical Revival façade. Now, on the first Friday of each month, local businesses stay open late, with special events and discounts.

Port Townsend, WA, went through its own reinvention. Expecting a shipping boom, 19th-century residents built out the town in high Victorian style—only to find themselves on the wrong side of Puget Sound when the railroads connected to Seattle. It’s been reborn as an arts center around the main drag, Water Street.

Second chances are just as American as a homespun Main Street, and with the recent economic downturn have come do-it-yourselfers seeing opportunity in cheap abandoned storefronts and converting them into bakeries or boutiques.

So it’s well worth driving the extra few miles to see what Main Street lies ahead. Let us point you in the right direction.

Read more at
The artwork  of 12 elementary school students will be featured in the 2012-13 North Carolina  Farm to School calendar. This is the second year for the calendar, more about
which  features daily agricultural facts and highlights the N.C. Farm to School  program and agriculture’s role in food production.
“Last year was the first year  for this calendar and we were blown away by the response. This year, a thousand  more students participated, making the task of selecting winning entries even  more difficult,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “We want kids to  know where their food comes from, and in creating artwork for the calendar and  using the calendar during the year, they gain a better understanding that all  food starts on a farm. The lesson comes full circle when they get to enjoy the  fruits and vegetables that are on the school lunch menu through our Farm to  School program.”
The N.C. Farm to School  program is a cooperative effort of the N.C. Department of Agriculture and  Consumer Services’ Food Distribution and Marketing divisions. These divisions secure  orders from school nutrition directors, and source and deliver locally grown  fruits and vegetables for school lunch programs. The program started in 1998  and is coming off its best year ever, with sales closing in on $1 million and  participation by 78 school districts statewide.
Winning entrants are:

  • Chad  Theriot, a fifth-grader at St. James Elementary School in Lincoln County;
  • Shalyn  Hogan, a fifth-grader at Page Street Elementary in Montgomery County;
  • Gayathri  Achar, a first-grader at Cedar Fork Elementary in Wake County. Achar was also a  winner in 2011 as a kindergartner;
  • Carson  Cope, a fifth-grader at Holly Ridge Elementary in Wake County;
  • Marissa  Blackwelder, a fourth-grader at Ethan H. Shive Elementary in Rowan County;
  • Shimia  Modlin, a third-grader at Hertford Grammar in Perquimans County;
  • Madison  Via, a second-grader at College Park Elementary in New Hanover County;
  • Mniah  Goins, a fifth-grader at Burton Elementary in Durham County;
  • Avery  Johnson, a kindergartner at H.B. Sugg Elementary in Pitt County;
  • Anna  Windsor, a third-grader at Shoals Elementary in Surry County;
  • Logan  Wilbanks, a first-grader at Millbridge Elementary in Rowan County;
  • Alexis  Casias, a fourth-grader at Pink Hill Elementary in Lenoir County;

The  calendar contest was open to public school students in grades kindergarten  through 5. There were 2,373 entries submitted from 49 counties. Winners will  receive a cash prize and a year’s subscription to Our State magazine. Prizes will  be awarded at a winner’s reception Friday, May 18, at 10:30 a.m. at the Got to  Be NC Festival.
School systems will receive a minimum number  of calendars before the start of the school year. Additional copies will be  available through NCDA&CS on a first-come, first-served basis. A  printer-friendly version can also be found at www.ncfarmtoschool.com.

(http://www.ncagr.gov/paffairs/release/2012/4-12FarmtoSchoolcalendars.htm)

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