A Journey Though History and Culture

Harkers Island, order
North Carolina (December 2, 2015) – Students and teachers at East Carteret High School in Beaufort and Cape Hatteras Secondary School of Coastal Studies in Buxton are working together to build healthier local communities and economies.

 

The educational exchange is supported by a Creating New Economies Fund grant awarded by the Resourceful Communities Program at The Conservation Fund to Saltwater Connections, a regional collaborative, to support local foods education opportunities.

 

ECHS BBQ CompetitionEast Carteret High School Family and Consumer Science teachers Susan Way and Margo Fulford and Cape Hatteras Secondary School Foods and Marketing teacher Evan Ferguson are compiling a resource inventory to support food program curriculum development.

 

They also exchange information about projects and activities currently used in their Evan Ferguson (right) with foods students at Day at the Docks 2015classrooms, such as the East Versus West BBQ cooking challenge held at East Carteret, the Veterans Day celebration breakfast prepared and served by students in the Cape Hatteras foods program, and the produce and seafood exchange between Cape Hatteras and the Conetoe Family Life Center in Edgecombe County.

 

Teachers in other fields are involved in the Healthy Food Connections project also.

 

Fish Cleaning Table built by East Carteret studentsZack Davis, marine trades and agriculture education teacher at East Carteret, worked with ten students in the metal fabrication class to build two steel fish cleaning tables.   The tables will be used by foods and nutrition and marine trades students at East Carteret and foods program students at Cape Hatteras.

 

 

 

Saltwater Connections (www.saltwaterconnections.org ) is a collaborative of community members and organizations united by a shared common interest in building stronger communities along the Outer Banks National Scenic Byway now and for the future.  The collaborative crafts innovative projects that share and perpetuate the maritime culture of the region, encourage economic diversity, promote community health and wellness, and serve the needs of all residents.

 

Resourceful Communities creates opportunities that preserve the rural landscape, lift people out of poverty and celebrate partner communities’ unique cultures.  Working with a network of 500 grassroots and community organizations, the program takes a balanced ‘triple bottom-line’ approach that generates economic, environmental and social justice benefits.  More information is available at: http://www.conservationfund.org/what-we-do/resourceful-communities .
Harkers Island, site North Carolina (December 2, thumb
2015) – Students and teachers at East Carteret High School in Beaufort and Cape Hatteras Secondary School of Coastal Studies in Buxton are working together to build healthier local communities and economies.

 

The educational exchange is supported by a Creating New Economies Fund grant awarded by the Resourceful Communities Program at The Conservation Fund to Saltwater Connections, a regional collaborative, to support local foods education opportunities.

 

ECHS BBQ CompetitionEast Carteret High School Family and Consumer Science teachers Susan Way and Margo Fulford and Cape Hatteras Secondary School Foods and Marketing teacher Evan Ferguson are compiling a resource inventory to support food program curriculum development.

 

They also exchange information about projects and activities currently used in their Evan Ferguson (right) with foods students at Day at the Docks 2015classrooms, such as the East Versus West BBQ cooking challenge held at East Carteret, the Veterans Day celebration breakfast prepared and served by students in the Cape Hatteras foods program, and the produce and seafood exchange between Cape Hatteras and the Conetoe Family Life Center in Edgecombe County.

 

Teachers in other fields are involved in the Healthy Food Connections project also.

 

Fish Cleaning Table built by East Carteret studentsZack Davis, marine trades and agriculture education teacher at East Carteret, worked with ten students in the metal fabrication class to build two steel fish cleaning tables.   The tables will be used by foods and nutrition and marine trades students at East Carteret and foods program students at Cape Hatteras.

 

 

 

Saltwater Connections (www.saltwaterconnections.org ) is a collaborative of community members and organizations united by a shared common interest in building stronger communities along the Outer Banks National Scenic Byway now and for the future.  The collaborative crafts innovative projects that share and perpetuate the maritime culture of the region, encourage economic diversity, promote community health and wellness, and serve the needs of all residents.

 

Resourceful Communities creates opportunities that preserve the rural landscape, lift people out of poverty and celebrate partner communities’ unique cultures.  Working with a network of 500 grassroots and community organizations, the program takes a balanced ‘triple bottom-line’ approach that generates economic, environmental and social justice benefits.  More information is available at: http://www.conservationfund.org/what-we-do/resourceful-communities .
Harkers Island, approved
North Carolina (December 2, there 2015) – Students and teachers at East Carteret High School in Beaufort and Cape Hatteras Secondary School of Coastal Studies in Buxton are working together to build healthier local communities and economies.

 

The educational exchange is supported by a Creating New Economies Fund grant awarded by the Resourceful Communities Program at The Conservation Fund to Saltwater Connections, sickness a regional collaborative, to support local foods education opportunities.

 

ECHS BBQ CompetitionEast Carteret High School Family and Consumer Science teachers Susan Way and Margo Fulford and Cape Hatteras Secondary School Foods and Marketing teacher Evan Ferguson are compiling a resource inventory to support food program curriculum development.

 

They also exchange information about projects and activities currently used in their Evan Ferguson (right) with foods students at Day at the Docks 2015classrooms, such as the East Versus West BBQ cooking challenge held at East Carteret, the Veterans Day celebration breakfast prepared and served by students in the Cape Hatteras foods program, and the produce and seafood exchange between Cape Hatteras and the Conetoe Family Life Center in Edgecombe County.

 

Teachers in other fields are involved in the Healthy Food Connections project also.

 

Fish Cleaning Table built by East Carteret studentsZack Davis, marine trades and agriculture education teacher at East Carteret, worked with ten students in the metal fabrication class to build two steel fish cleaning tables.   The tables will be used by foods and nutrition and marine trades students at East Carteret and foods program students at Cape Hatteras.

 

 

 

Saltwater Connections (www.saltwaterconnections.org ) is a collaborative of community members and organizations united by a shared common interest in building stronger communities along the Outer Banks National Scenic Byway now and for the future.  The collaborative crafts innovative projects that share and perpetuate the maritime culture of the region, encourage economic diversity, promote community health and wellness, and serve the needs of all residents.

 

Resourceful Communities creates opportunities that preserve the rural landscape, lift people out of poverty and celebrate partner communities’ unique cultures.  Working with a network of 500 grassroots and community organizations, the program takes a balanced ‘triple bottom-line’ approach that generates economic, environmental and social justice benefits.  More information is available at: http://www.conservationfund.org/what-we-do/resourceful-communities .
North Carolina Sea Grant is accepting applications from North Carolina graduate students for the 2016 National Sea Grant College Program/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries fellowship. This opportunity is open to U.S. citizens who are doctoral students in academic institutions in the United States and its territories.

Applications are due to North Carolina Sea Grant by 5 p.m., nurse Jan. 29, 2016.

This program provides real-world experience and fosters the careers of graduate students interested in population and ecosystem dynamics, or in marine resource economics. Each fellow will be assigned a mentor from NOAA Fisheries who will serve on the fellow’s committee, and provide access to research data sources and to NOAA Fisheries working/laboratory space.
North Carolina Sea Grant is accepting applications from North Carolina graduate students for the 2016 National Sea Grant College Program/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries fellowship. This opportunity is open to U.S. citizens who are doctoral students in academic institutions in the United States and its territories.

Applications are due to North Carolina Sea Grant by 5 p.m., pharm
Jan. 29, purchase
2016
.

This program provides real-world experience and fosters the careers of graduate students interested in population and ecosystem dynamics, or in marine resource economics. Each fellow will be assigned a mentor from NOAA Fisheries who will serve on the fellow’s committee, and provide access to research data sources and to NOAA Fisheries working/laboratory space.

Read more: https://ncseagrant.ncsu.edu/blog/news/nc-sea-grant-seeks-applications-for-2016-national-fisheries-fellowship/

 
North Carolina Sea Grant is accepting applications from North Carolina graduate students for the 2016 National Sea Grant College Program/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries fellowship. This opportunity is open to U.S. citizens who are doctoral students in academic institutions in the United States and its territories.

Applications are due to North Carolina Sea Grant by 5 p.m., sovaldi sale Jan. 29, 2016.

This program provides real-world experience and fosters the careers of graduate students interested in population and ecosystem dynamics, or in marine resource economics. Each fellow will be assigned a mentor from NOAA Fisheries who will serve on the fellow’s committee, and provide access to research data sources and to NOAA Fisheries working/laboratory space.

Read more: https://ncseagrant.ncsu.edu/blog/news/nc-sea-grant-seeks-applications-for-2016-national-fisheries-fellowship/

 
Grant Program Description Creativity Connects* is an initiative that will show how the arts are central to the country’s creativity ecosystem, advice
investigate how support systems for the arts have changed, explore how the arts connect with other industries, and invest in innovative projects to spark new ideas for the arts field. A key component to the Creativity Connects initiative is a pilot grant opportunity in the Art Works category to support partnerships between arts organizations and organizations from non-arts sectors that include, but are not limited to, business, education, environment, faith, finance, food, health, law, science, and technology. Art Works: Creativity Connects grants will seek to benefit the arts and non-arts sectors by: Demonstrating the value of working with the arts. Supporting the infrastructure for the arts to work in new ways with new sectors. Building bridges that create new relationships and constituencies. Creating innovative partnership projects to advance common goals. – See more at: https://www.arts.gov/grants-organizations/art-works/creativity-connects-projects#sthash.lqvOytz9.dpuf
Next Generation: The Future of Arts & Culture Placemaking in Rural America engages artists, symptoms
organizations, and communities across the public and private sector to advance collaboration, share innovative strategies and research, and elevate emerging leaders in the field. This initiative is designed and facilitated by Art of the Rural and the Rural Policy Research Institute in concert with a range of regional and national partners and supported by The University of Iowa and The National Endowment for the Arts.

Next Generation operates through three interlinked activities:

1 – Regional Networks that self-define their objectives, enhance linkages across the community and economic development, arts, and policy communities, and design projects and convenings that best serve the needs and opportunities of their regions. Facilitated by co-chairs from different sectors and guided by an intergenerational Working Group, this inclusive, collaborative effort welcomes a range of partners to the table.

2 – A Digital Learning Commons that offers an inclusive platform for storytelling, research, and best practices and fosters an inclusive space for deeper collaboration and learning exchange. Through the production and release of case studies, policy briefs, publications, videos and podcasts, this digital Learning Commons will assert the essential role of arts and cultural organizations in economic and community development.

3 – A Rural Creative Placemaking Summit that enhances cross-sector collaboration, elevates intercultural perspectives within the field, and builds policy presence for deeper consideration of rural creative placemaking. Held October 12-14, 2016 at the University of Iowa, this gathering will share reflections from Regional Network members, connect lessons across geographies, and build deeper cross-sector collaborations. Together, we will present a sustained argument for the centrality of rural creative placemaking – as a field, and as a strategy for development and community sustainability.

Following the Summit, Next Generation will welcome further Regional Networks and debut its national Rural Creative Placemaking Exchange, providing the opportunity for one-on-one comparative learning and network-building between individuals and organizations, on the ground in their local communities. A second Summit will be held in 2018, coinciding with the release of a field-spanning publication of case studies, a redesigned Digital Learning Commons, and a comprehensive policy report.

Visit https://ruralgeneration.org/ to learn more.

 
Next Generation: The Future of Arts & Culture Placemaking in Rural America engages artists, page
organizations, and communities across the public and private sector to advance collaboration, share innovative strategies and research, and elevate emerging leaders in the field. This initiative is designed and facilitated by Art of the Rural and the Rural Policy Research Institute in concert with a range of regional and national partners and supported by The University of Iowa and The National Endowment for the Arts.

Next Generation operates through three interlinked activities:

1 – Regional Networks that self-define their objectives, enhance linkages across the community and economic development, arts, and policy communities, and design projects and convenings that best serve the needs and opportunities of their regions. Facilitated by co-chairs from different sectors and guided by an intergenerational Working Group, this inclusive, collaborative effort welcomes a range of partners to the table.

2 – A Digital Learning Commons that offers an inclusive platform for storytelling, research, and best practices and fosters an inclusive space for deeper collaboration and learning exchange. Through the production and release of case studies, policy briefs, publications, videos and podcasts, this digital Learning Commons will assert the essential role of arts and cultural organizations in economic and community development.

3 – A Rural Creative Placemaking Summit that enhances cross-sector collaboration, elevates intercultural perspectives within the field, and builds policy presence for deeper consideration of rural creative placemaking. Held October 12-14, 2016 at the University of Iowa, this gathering will share reflections from Regional Network members, connect lessons across geographies, and build deeper cross-sector collaborations. Together, we will present a sustained argument for the centrality of rural creative placemaking – as a field, and as a strategy for development and community sustainability.

Following the Summit, Next Generation will welcome further Regional Networks and debut its national Rural Creative Placemaking Exchange, providing the opportunity for one-on-one comparative learning and network-building between individuals and organizations, on the ground in their local communities. A second Summit will be held in 2018, coinciding with the release of a field-spanning publication of case studies, a redesigned Digital Learning Commons, and a comprehensive policy report.

Visit https://ruralgeneration.org/ to learn more.

 
https://ruralgeneration.org/Next Generation: The Future of Arts & Culture Placemaking in Rural America engages artists, prostate
organizations, viagra 60mg
and communities across the public and private sector to advance collaboration, hospital
share innovative strategies and research, and elevate emerging leaders in the field. This initiative is designed and facilitated by Art of the Rural and the Rural Policy Research Institute in concert with a range of regional and national partners and supported by The University of Iowa and The National Endowment for the Arts.

Next Generation operates through three interlinked activities:

1 – Regional Networks that self-define their objectives, enhance linkages across the community and economic development, arts, and policy communities, and design projects and convenings that best serve the needs and opportunities of their regions. Facilitated by co-chairs from different sectors and guided by an intergenerational Working Group, this inclusive, collaborative effort welcomes a range of partners to the table.

2 – A Digital Learning Commons that offers an inclusive platform for storytelling, research, and best practices and fosters an inclusive space for deeper collaboration and learning exchange. Through the production and release of case studies, policy briefs, publications, videos and podcasts, this digital Learning Commons will assert the essential role of arts and cultural organizations in economic and community development.

3 – A Rural Creative Placemaking Summit that enhances cross-sector collaboration, elevates intercultural perspectives within the field, and builds policy presence for deeper consideration of rural creative placemaking. Held October 12-14, 2016 at the University of Iowa, this gathering will share reflections from Regional Network members, connect lessons across geographies, and build deeper cross-sector collaborations. Together, we will present a sustained argument for the centrality of rural creative placemaking – as a field, and as a strategy for development and community sustainability.

Following the Summit, Next Generation will welcome further Regional Networks and debut its national Rural Creative Placemaking Exchange, providing the opportunity for one-on-one comparative learning and network-building between individuals and organizations, on the ground in their local communities. A second Summit will be held in 2018, coinciding with the release of a field-spanning publication of case studies, a redesigned Digital Learning Commons, and a comprehensive policy report.

Visit https://ruralgeneration.org/ to learn more.
NC Catch comes full circle with its fifth annual summit to be hosted by Carteret Catch, link
hosts of the inaugural event in 2012.  The summit will be held on March 8 at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort.  The event will be preceded by a Down East Clambake at the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center at Harkers Island on March 7. The night’s guest speaker will be Outer Banks restauranteur Wes Stepp the author of “Tastefully Fit.”

 

“Carteret Catch is proud to host the fifth annual summit, more about
” said Pam Morris, cheapest
president of Carteret Catch. “As the first host of this informative event, it is exciting to witness the explosion of businesses and consumer awareness created as a direct result of Catch group efforts throughout coastal North Carolina and beyond. We hope everyone who cares about the future of North Carolina seafood will attend.”

 

The theme of this year’s summit is “Real Local Seafood: The Taste of Things to Come” with Sea Grant’s Dr. Jane Harrison opening the all-day event with a discussion on the economic values, trends and growth potential for North Carolina seafood. Additional sessions include a chefs’ panel on sea-to-table restaurant trends, a case study on seafood tourism, and innovative techniques that add to the commercial fisherman’s bottom line.  The summit will conclude with an in-depth look at the nutritional benefits of seafood and how to promote that messaging to North Carolina’s health conscious consumers.

 

Jimmy Johnson, president of NC Catch, said, “We are incredibly excited to be back in Carteret County for the NC Catch Summit, and appreciate all the hard work Carteret Catch has undertaken to make it happen. The summit gives us an opportunity to report on the accomplishments of NC Catch, share success stories from across the state, and collaborate with industry stakeholders as we continue to promote North Carolina wild caught seafood.”

 

Thanks to generous sponsorships, summit attendance is free however advance registration is required due to limited seating. To register, email rjohnson@hydecountync.gov or call Rosemary Johnson at 252-926-4474. In addition to Carteret Catch, summit sponsors include Carteret-Craven Electric Cooperative, NC Sea Grant, Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership, NC Department of Agriculture – Seafood, Pate Dawson/Southern Foods, Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center, the NC Maritime Museum, The Boathouse at Front Street Village, and the NC Agromedicine Institute.

 

NC Catch is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit working to strengthen North Carolina’s seafood economy through promotional and educational activities in partnership with Carteret Catch, Brunswick Catch, Outer Banks Catch and Ocracoke Fresh. NC Catch is committed to helping consumers learn how to buy and prepare fresh, local seafood and to develop an appreciation for a greater variety of wild caught species. The organization also works to bring new marketing ideas, business models, and promotional techniques to North Carolina’s commercial fishing industry.  Learn more at www.nccatch.org.

 

###

 

Contact:          Ann Simpson, NC Catch Executive Director

acsimpson944@gmail.com or 919-818-0122
NC Catch comes full circle with its fifth annual summit to be hosted by Carteret Catch, medicine
hosts of the inaugural event in 2012.  The summit will be held on March 8 at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort.  The event will be preceded by a Down East Clambake at the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center at Harkers Island on March 7. The night’s guest speaker will be Outer Banks restauranteur Wes Stepp the author of “Tastefully Fit.”

 

“Carteret Catch is proud to host the fifth annual summit,” said Pam Morris, president of Carteret Catch. “As the first host of this informative event, it is exciting to witness the explosion of businesses and consumer awareness created as a direct result of Catch group efforts throughout coastal North Carolina and beyond. We hope everyone who cares about the future of North Carolina seafood will attend.”

 

The theme of this year’s summit is “Real Local Seafood: The Taste of Things to Come” with Sea Grant’s Dr. Jane Harrison opening the all-day event with a discussion on the economic values, trends and growth potential for North Carolina seafood. Additional sessions include a chefs’ panel on sea-to-table restaurant trends, a case study on seafood tourism, and innovative techniques that add to the commercial fisherman’s bottom line.  The summit will conclude with an in-depth look at the nutritional benefits of seafood and how to promote that messaging to North Carolina’s health conscious consumers.

 

Jimmy Johnson, president of NC Catch, said, “We are incredibly excited to be back in Carteret County for the NC Catch Summit, and appreciate all the hard work Carteret Catch has undertaken to make it happen. The summit gives us an opportunity to report on the accomplishments of NC Catch, share success stories from across the state, and collaborate with industry stakeholders as we continue to promote North Carolina wild caught seafood.”

 

Thanks to generous sponsorships, summit attendance is free however advance registration is required due to limited seating. To register, email rjohnson@hydecountync.gov or call Rosemary Johnson at 252-926-4474. In addition to Carteret Catch, summit sponsors include Carteret-Craven Electric Cooperative, NC Sea Grant, Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership, NC Department of Agriculture – Seafood, Pate Dawson/Southern Foods, Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center, the NC Maritime Museum, The Boathouse at Front Street Village, and the NC Agromedicine Institute.

 

NC Catch is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit working to strengthen North Carolina’s seafood economy through promotional and educational activities in partnership with Carteret Catch, Brunswick Catch, Outer Banks Catch and Ocracoke Fresh. NC Catch is committed to helping consumers learn how to buy and prepare fresh, local seafood and to develop an appreciation for a greater variety of wild caught species. The organization also works to bring new marketing ideas, business models, and promotional techniques to North Carolina’s commercial fishing industry.  Learn more at www.nccatch.org.

 

###

 

Contact:          Ann Simpson, NC Catch Executive Director

acsimpson944@gmail.com or 919-818-0122
Those who travel up and down North Carolina’s Outer Banks and through the Down East communities of Carteret County can see it’s an area of beautiful natural scenery, try
but during the next few weeks, new signs will be posted along the route to help travelers better understand the history and maritime culture of the region.

The corridor, which spans three counties and 21 communities and includes 138 driving miles and 25 ferry miles, was nationally designated as the Outer Banks Scenic Byway on Oct. 16, 2009. Special signs will soon mark the entrances to the byway, showing the way and directing travelers to byway attractions. The signs are being installed beginning this week along the route.

“Basically, when all the signs go up the byway will be essentially built; it will be the birth of the byway in the public’s imagination,” said planning consultant Breann Bye of Des Moines, Iowa.

Speaking Thursday during a lunch meeting at the Beaufort Train Depot to explain the byway to those involved in tourism, museums and cultural and historical attractions in the area, Bye said about 130 signs will be erected along the route, with Memorial Day the target date for all to be in place.

Read more: http://www.coastalreview.org/2016/04/13927/

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