Catamarans – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 02:58:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saltwaterconnections.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Catamarans – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ 32 32 Colin MacRae, Girlfriend Silvia Latini Split: Below Deck Sailing Yacht Recap https://saltwaterconnections.org/colin-macrae-girlfriend-silvia-latini-split-below-deck-sailing-yacht-recap/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 01:31:01 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/colin-macrae-girlfriend-silvia-latini-split-below-deck-sailing-yacht-recap/ Colin MacRae went public with girlfriend Silvia Latini in January. So like the Sailboat under the bridge The season 3 reunion began on June 27, a big “congratulations” was in order for the chief engineer, as Andy Cohen read a question from a fan who wanted to know how things were going with the couple […]]]>

Colin MacRae went public with girlfriend Silvia Latini in January. So like the Sailboat under the bridge The season 3 reunion began on June 27, a big “congratulations” was in order for the chief engineer, as Andy Cohen read a question from a fan who wanted to know how things were going with the couple these days.

Unfortunately, these good wishes from the viewer came a bit too late. “We’ve decided to go our separate ways,” Colin said of him and Silvia, adding, “Yeah, thanks for the congratulations.”

Andy noted, “Colin is back on the market,” and that might be good news for some of the lead engineers. Parsifal III teammates, as the women memorably played Shag, Marry, Kill this season and all said they would “marry” Colin. When Andy asked Colin what he thought of this game, the lead engineer said he wasn’t sure what to make of it. “Yeah, what does that mean?” Colin said everyone chooses to “marry her”. “Is that a good thing? Nobody ever wants to hit Colin. They just want to marry him.

Daisy Kelliher then explained to Colin why that was actually a good thing. “If you marry someone, you can fuck them for the rest of your life,” she said. “That’s a compliment.”

As the Sailboat under the bridge The Season 3 reunion has come to an end, Colin, who was talking remotely from a hotel room in Costa Rica, shared what he’s been up to since the end of the charter season. “I just got a little catamaran on which I go around the world,” he shared.

You can hear more of Colin on his catamaran, parlay revivalas well as the “dramas” of his life outside Sailing yacht below deck, in this exclusive interview with Bravo Insider.

Colin also documents his adventures on his YouTube channel, Sailing Parlay Revival, which he talked about more while reflecting on this season of Sailboat under the bridge on Instagram on June 21 following the Season 3 finale. “It’s a wrap! Giggle club over and out!” Colin wrote, referencing his friendship with Gary King and Marcos Spaziani. “Thank you for all of your supportive messages and comments this season, I’ve been blown away by it all. [Captain Glenn Shephard], you’re a rock star, always. Thank you for being an admirable leader. See you all at YouTube Land.

Sailboat under the bridge is streaming on Peacock.

The dish of the day is your source for all things Bravo, from behind-the-scenes scoops to breaking news, exclusive interviews, photos, original videos and, oh, so much more. To subscribe to The dish of the day podcast, join our Facebook group and follow us on Instagram for the latest news fresh from the press. Sign up to become a Bravo Insider and be the first to get exclusive extras.

]]>
BMT, hybrid-electric ship of the Penguin commission https://saltwaterconnections.org/bmt-hybrid-electric-ship-of-the-penguin-commission/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 19:26:31 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/bmt-hybrid-electric-ship-of-the-penguin-commission/ Overseas staff SOUTHAMPTON, UNITED KINGDOM – BMT says it has successfully commissioned its latest hybrid vessel for the Maritime and Ports Authority of Singapore (MPA). Developed in conjunction with Penguin Shipyard International, the advanced hybrid-electric aluminum catamaran, dubbed AMP Guardian, is a 35m patrol vessel designed to conduct patrol, search and rescue, oil spill response, […]]]>

Overseas staff

SOUTHAMPTON, UNITED KINGDOM – BMT says it has successfully commissioned its latest hybrid vessel for the Maritime and Ports Authority of Singapore (MPA).

Developed in conjunction with Penguin Shipyard International, the advanced hybrid-electric aluminum catamaran, dubbed AMP Guardian, is a 35m patrol vessel designed to conduct patrol, search and rescue, oil spill response, drone operations and rescue support. It will also serve as the government’s testbed for new technology and equipment.

Accommodating up to 24 personnel, BMT says the ship will be deployed in a command and control role during multi-ship operations and as a first responder in a wide variety of missions.

BMT claims that the ship’s propulsion system is an advanced hybrid-electric system based on a combination of electric and diesel mechanical propulsion. To best fulfill its operating duty, the ship can operate in different modes. In 100% electric and zero emission mode, AMP Guardian can cruise silently at six knots for up to three hours.

The vessel can also operate in diesel-electric mode to achieve continuous operation at medium speed. In this mode, power is drawn from one of the two main motors to propel the two shafts while recharging the batteries. This mode offers a significant benefit in terms of reduced emissions and reduced engine wear.

In its conventional diesel mechanical mode, AMP Guardian can run at a top speed of nearly 27 knots. In this mode, the electrical generation capability offered by the hybrid system also eliminates the need for on-board diesel generators.

BMT claims that these features, combined with a highly efficient hull form optimized for minimal resistance throughout the entire operating speed range, result in a low-emission, future-proof vessel that will help reduce the footprint. carbon from the Port of Singapore.

25.06.2022

]]>
SuMoth: the eco-responsible foil design challenge for students https://saltwaterconnections.org/sumoth-the-eco-responsible-foil-design-challenge-for-students/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 07:04:10 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/sumoth-the-eco-responsible-foil-design-challenge-for-students/ The SuMoth Challenge is a unique design competition for students to build and race International Moth dinghies similar to Formula Student. Lake Garda, Italy is set to host its annual gathering of speed-focused sailors and designers during Foiling Week, which combines racing on the water with the opportunity to showcase and share innovative design ideas […]]]>

The SuMoth Challenge is a unique design competition for students to build and race International Moth dinghies similar to Formula Student.

Lake Garda, Italy is set to host its annual gathering of speed-focused sailors and designers during Foiling Week, which combines racing on the water with the opportunity to showcase and share innovative design ideas around all things foiling. Alongside Foiling Week will be the SUMoth Challenge, a design and build competition for students tasked with creating a foiling boat that meets International Moth class rules, but focuses on efficiency and sustainability.

The idea was conceived by engineer Bruno Giuntoli. Giuntoli is well versed in student design, having been a key part of the École de Technologie Supérieure (ETS) team in Montreal, which built a Class C hydrofoil catamaran for the 2015 ‘Little America’s Cup’ on the lake. Leman.

The SUMoth challenge was launched as a result of this challenge. The main driver, admits Giuntoli, was to keep this college club running.

“Class C is not a realistic project for a university. Our university was quite ready for projects and we went from a non-existent club to end up with the biggest project of the school,” he says.

Giuntoli’s C-Class catamaran Gust at the 2015 Little America’s Cup in Geneva in 2015. Photo: C/O SUMoth Challenge

The C-Class catamaran is a very sophisticated and incredibly expensive foiling catamaran with a 15m high wing sail constructed almost entirely from high modulus carbon fibre, and costs £100,000 to design and build.

The class has long been used for what is officially called the International Class C Catamaran Championship, but is commonly referred to as the Little America’s Cup – despite a court ruling banning official use of the name.

“We’ve worked incredibly hard to build this club and if you don’t have a competition to aim for, there’s really no reason there should be one at a university,” Giuntoli continued.

The article continues below…

The biggest revolution in watersports in general has been foiling, and it’s easy to see the use of hydrofoils…

On November 24, 2012, Paul Larsen and his Sailrocket team rewrote our understanding of sailboat physics, stamping their…

“So I came up with this sustainable moth challenge where one of my goals was to change these super efficient building methods [the foiling Moth class is similar to the C-Class in the high-tech and expensive materials used] to more durable ones with different materials.

“And I also thought it would help new students to latch on to the concept and make the club work.”

Several levels

The student design competition saw some adjustments made to the format during the Covid pandemic. However, in 2022, eight varsity teams will meet during Foiling Week, four with working moths to compete – although competition on the water is only a very small part of the overall score.

“At first we said, ‘These are the rules, in Garda in a year, goodbye’,” recalls Giuntoli.

However, it soon became apparent that although the project attracted considerable interest, some universities simply did not understand the complexities and some student teams would be unlikely to muster the funding for a highly complex boat build.

“It’s not the easiest competition to be honest,” notes Giuntoli, explaining that the complexity of designing the functional hydrofoil is far greater than many realize.

“There were many teams that signed up and then realized how much work was involved. So at first we had maybe 12 signups, then halfway through several realized it was way too much work.

PoliMe team members from Politecnico di Milano, Italy. Photo: C/O SUMoth Challenge

With a high attrition rate, the decision was made to create a three-stage competition.

“The idea was that the first step is purely design, so if you don’t have the materials or the money, all you need is a computer and some brain oil – plus time and passion”, says Giuntoli.

“Because we want the competition to be design driven, this is the stage that gives the most points overall.

“That’s key, we wanted it to be primarily an academic competition, not just an on-water competition, as most of the students are engineers, not professional sailors.”

The second stage is a “Plan B” for a competition on the water where it is not possible to go to Garda, which consists of recording the navigation performance of the boat on a GPS plotter.

The third and final stage is the one that takes place in Garda during Foiling Week, where the boats will compete and the teams will also make a public presentation (it can be watched live on the Foiling Week website).

The SUMoth expert The expert judges

Design and ideas are evaluated by a panel of expert judges, which includes America’s Cup designers, Moth builders, sustainability managers, fast sail designers and many more big names.

As the goal is to advance the design and the rules are open to a reasonable amount of interpretation, the judging panel will be key in deciding the winning designs.

“There are many different approaches and teams have taken on the challenge in different ways,” says Giuntoli.

“The Southampton Boat [University] is a very nice boat, but they went to Maguire [Boats] and made a moth with their borrowed molds, but with different materials. And they made the wings out of wood and stuff like that. It looks great and it sails very well, but it doesn’t necessarily develop completely new ideas.

The official launch of the University of Southampton’s Moonshot Moth. Photo c/o Harken

Ultimately, teams will be judged and scored on the amount of innovation brought to the table, but Giuntoli is happy that the rules are interpreted in any way teams see fit.

“Take the University of Southampton entry that I mentioned. They’re doing it as their latest university project.

“It’s for their degree and they’re able to incorporate that into the SuMoth concept, but they’re not necessarily there just to get technical points from us,” he concludes.

Women in STEM

SUMoth is not just a design competition, there are other facets to the challenge as well. Giuntoli is very aware of how few women are represented both in the field of marine engineering and in this type of design-focused academic challenge, so the inclusion of women is rewarded with extra points.

Hattie Rogers will sail the University of Southampton’s entry to Garda, for example, which will earn the team some extra points.

“Usually these student clubs tend to be mostly guys. And I think women don’t often get the chance to be involved, so we try to push to try to get more girls on the teams. So far it seems to have been a success,” says Giuntoli.

SuMoth reigns supreme

Another element that sets the SUMoth challenge apart is its focus on creating new design solutions while avoiding the use of environmentally harmful materials.

However, defining what could be considered a “good” material and a “bad” material is, in itself, a tall order.

The goal is to reward innovation without adding new, hard-to-recycle products to the ever-expanding global waste pile, while keeping costs manageable. Recycling old hulls and turning them into foils is something that is highly encouraged.

The team from the École de Technologie Supérieure (ETS) in Montreal with their Moth, Rafale. Photo: c/o SuMoth Challenge

Giuntoli’s proposed solution for the use of new materials was to provide all teams with an upper cost limit of $10,000 – roughly the same price as a Waszp, itself a simplified and cheaper version of the foiling Moth.

But while this price limit may help compel teams to use recycled materials, it does not limit new items that are cheap but costly for the environment.

To keep control over which products could be used, Giuntoli proposed a concept currency, SuDollars, with each material also having a cost in SUDollar.

“Take, for example, MDF, which is basically glue. It’s super cheap to buy, so it’s an obvious choice for mold building, but we didn’t want to see molds made from MDF by our teams,” he explains. MDF is a very expensive material in SUDollars.

“It’s a problem we see across our industry. So the idea is that if we have this currency, it should help inspire people to find new and better ways to do the same thing.

“Another example is EPS foam [Expanded Polystyrene, used between glass in foam sandwich construction]. It’s more expensive to recycle than to make new foam, so it’s also expensive in SUDollars.

The plan for the future is to hold an annual competition during Foiling Week, although the two are held separately.

Check out the winners and learn more about the teams on the SUMoth Challenge website.


If you enjoyed this….

Yachting World is the world’s leading magazine for offshore cruisers and offshore sailors. Every month we bring you inspiring adventures and practical features to help you realize your sailing dreams.

Expand your knowledge with a subscription delivered to your door. Check our latest offers and save at least 30% on the sale price.

]]>
The results are the real reflection >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-results-are-the-real-reflection-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 15:08:58 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-results-are-the-real-reflection-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ After finishing eighth out of nine teams, United States SailGP team skipper Jimmy Spithill looks back on the Sailing Grand Prix challenge in Chicago on June 18-19 and insists the team will get the most out of it. difficult times. One of the best things about sport is that it humbles you, you’re never safe […]]]>

After finishing eighth out of nine teams, United States SailGP team skipper Jimmy Spithill looks back on the Sailing Grand Prix challenge in Chicago on June 18-19 and insists the team will get the most out of it. difficult times.


One of the best things about sport is that it humbles you, you’re never safe – and at the highest level things can change at any time.

There are no shortcuts or lies about how you go: the results are the true reflection.

When you’re having a good day on the racetrack, there’s no better feeling in the world, but when it’s bad, there’s nothing to hide from. You have to look in the mirror, be honest with yourself, and find a way to use tough times or bad results as learning opportunities.

That’s what we’re doing this week, after a really disappointing result in our return to the T-Mobile USA Sailing Grand Prix in Chicago this weekend.

We have no excuses, but the reality is that we weren’t able to execute clean starts and consistent maneuvers. I’m glad we managed to get a podium finish in the final race to give the fans something to cheer on, but we let a lot of people down on Navy Pier.

And what a huge turnout. Man, the vibe was amazing. We could hear the sound of the water, and it’s probably the closest thing to a sports stadium I’ve seen while sailing. Honestly, these fans deserved a win, and we hope to come back and give them a better performance. It’s a real sports crazy city.

The level of this SailGP fleet continues to rise and the pressure on the course is immense. It’s no coincidence that teams with more reps and hours together tend to be the ones at the top. That said, it’s no longer surprising to see someone win one race and then finish at the back of the pack in the next race. It shows that any team can win.

One thing I won’t do is shoot shots. I’ve learned in my career that sometimes you just have to take your meds and learn the lesson. We’ve built this team on candor and honesty, and we’ll use all of that to go through all the footage and data from last weekend.

These tough times are a great test for top teams: we’ve dug ourselves this hole, and we need to figure out how to get back in the race.

I believe we have the right tools and the right people. We didn’t start Season 3 the way we hoped, but we have to keep working hard and weed out stupid mistakes and mistakes on the water – myself included.

That’s what world-class sport is all about: it’s not supposed to be easy. The whole appeal of racing in this incredible competition is that it’s no picnic. It’s difficult. It’s difficult. No one goes there to lose, and when you do, you’ll lose sleep and question yourself.

There aren’t many top sports where literally any team can win, and any team can finish last. And despite the result for us, Chicago was a huge success for SailGP, with an insane number of fans tuning in and showing up to watch the race.

We’re attracting more and more fans, and we’ve also had some special guests for the Chicago ride, like pro wakeboarder Parks Bonifay and Darnell Mooney of the Chicago Bears.

These guys are serious athletes, and every time they approach the F50 their minds are blown, which shows just how crazy these racing machines are.

For these top performers – and the likes of Kai Lenny and Jamie O’Brien – becoming fans of SailGP gives our sport real credibility. It seems the more we can put this race in front of people, they convert as soon as they experience it. With boats flying at 100 km/h, powered only by the wind, you kind of have to see it to believe it.

Then a trip to the Great Britain Sail Grand Prix – and a return to saltwater sailing. The freshwater race on Lake Michigan was really different for the teams because the foils react differently – it takes more speed to lift, and it’s harder to keep flying when you do.

It’s the first time we’ve raced on a lake since I joined SailGP, and I hope that’s a harbinger. I’m excited about the potential for opening up new places and markets that were previously off limits. I mean, look at the amount of freshwater lakes across Europe and the northern hemisphere.

We might even bring the best sailing in the world to Las Vegas, where some of the toughest heavyweights in the world have taken some big punches and got back on their feet.

Hopefully we can do the same when we head to the UK at the end of July.


Final results*
1. Australia, 7-2-3-9-1-(1), 33 points
2. Canada, 4-1-1-2-2-(2), 45 points
3. Great Britain, 2-3-2-3-5-(3), 40 points
4. New Zealand, 1-5-4-5-8, 32 points
5. France, 9-8-6-1-4, 27 points
6. Denmark, 3-4-8-6-7, 27 points
7. Spain, 5-6-5-8-6, 25 points
8. USA, 8-9-7-7-3, 21 points
9. Switzerland, 6-7-9-4-9, 20 points
*The Japan SailGP team will be absent from the first events of the season due to a series of external factors which mean that only nine F50s are available for the start of Season 3.

SailGP Info – Chicago Details – Season 3 Scoreboard – Facebook – How to Watch

Ranking of Season 3 (after two events)*
1. Australia, Tom Slingsby – 20 points
2. Canada, Phil Robertson – 17 points
3. Great Britain, Ben Ainslie – 17 points
4. New Zealand, Peter Burling – 12 points
5. Denmark, Nicolai Sehested – 12 points
6. France, Quentin Delapierre – 9 points
7. United States, Jimmy Spithill – 9 points
8. Spain, Jordi Xammar – 8 points
9. Switzerland, Sebastien Schneiter – 4 points
*Japan, Nathan Outteridge: For the events they miss, Japan will receive regatta points based on the average of their regatta points in the first three regattas they enter.

2022-23 SailGP Season 3 Schedule*
May 14-15, 2022 – Bermuda Sailing Grand Prix presented by Hamilton Princess
June 18-19, 2022 – United States Sailing Grand Prix | Chicago to Navy Pier
30-31 July 2022 – British Sailing Grand Prix | Plymouth
August 18-19, 2022 – ROCKWOOL Danish Sailing Grand Prix | Copenhagen
September 9-10, 2022 – French Sailing Grand Prix | Saint Tropez
September 23-24, 2022 – Spanish Sailing Grand Prix | Andalusia – Cadiz
November 11-12, 2022 – Dubai Sail Grand Prix presented by P&O Marinas
January 14-15, 2023 – Singapore Sailing Grand Prix
18-19 February 2023 – Australian Sailing Grand Prix | sydney
17-18 March 2023 – New Zealand Sailing Grand Prix | christchurch
May 6-7, 2023 – United States Sailing Grand Prix | San Francisco (Season 3 Grand Finals)

Format of SailGP 2022-23 events:
• The teams compete on identical F50 catamarans.
• Each event takes place over two days.
• There are three races each day, totaling six races at each event.
• The first five fleet races involve all teams.
• The final race will pit the top three ranked teams against each other to be crowned event champions and win the biggest share of the $300,000 prize pool to be split among the top three teams.
• The season ends with the Grand Finals, which includes the Final Championship Race – a match-based race where the winner takes it all for the $1 million prize.

For competition documents, click here.

Founded in 2018, SailGP seeks to be an annual global sports league featuring fan-centric inshore racing in some of the world’s iconic ports. Rival national teams compete in identical F50 catamarans for cash prizes as the season culminates in a million dollar match-winning race.

]]>
Participants of the Lake Cumberland Thunder Run enjoy the 14th annual gathering https://saltwaterconnections.org/participants-of-the-lake-cumberland-thunder-run-enjoy-the-14th-annual-gathering/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:19:11 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/participants-of-the-lake-cumberland-thunder-run-enjoy-the-14th-annual-gathering/ Continuing the good-natured fun, in case anyone was wondering, the 14th Annual Lake Cumberland Thunder Run in Kentucky did indeed have an official sighting from Stephen Miles. The “superstar” painter behind Stephen Miles Design in Owensboro, Ky., enjoyed racing in his 34-foot MTI catamaran alongside several friends, including Chris and Shelby Mattingly, Chuck and Shannon […]]]>

Continuing the good-natured fun, in case anyone was wondering, the 14th Annual Lake Cumberland Thunder Run in Kentucky did indeed have an official sighting from Stephen Miles. The “superstar” painter behind Stephen Miles Design in Owensboro, Ky., enjoyed racing in his 34-foot MTI catamaran alongside several friends, including Chris and Shelby Mattingly, Chuck and Shannon Stark, and many more.

More than 90 boats took part in the 14th annual Lake Cumberland Thunder Run in Kentucky. Photos by Pete Boden/Shoot 2 Thrill Pix

Seriously, Miles and his better half, Heather, had a great time on their first Thunder Run at State Dock.

“(Thunder Run organizers) Justin Lucas and Dan Wiess have supported the Kuttawa Cannonball Run since its inception,” Miles said. “Jeff Hoefling and Terry Martin (Miles’ other Kuttawa coordinators) have always been involved in supporting the Thunder Run. It was good to finally join them.

To complement the camaraderie among attendees, Miles and nearly 100 other boat owners and their friends and family members were treated to great weather, great ports of call and great entertainment.

“The weather was great and we had a blast as usual,” said Tennessee performance boater Chad Collier, who enjoyed racing with his wife, Heather, in their luxury MTI-V performance center console. 42. “Justin (Lucas) is always so organized and has everything planned for the whole weekend. Lake Cumberland is one of, if not the the cleanest and most beautiful lakes in the Southeast!

“It was the first event for our new (for us) MTI and it went really well,” he added. “We love the new boat. We had Kenny Ray Schomp and his significant other, Cassidy Boyer, with us and we all had a great time. I also got to ride one of the new MTI 390X cats for the first time – my friend Mark Godsey’s Project Mayhemand I was super impressed too.

Speedonthewater.com chief photographer Pete Boden says his first trip to beautiful Lake Cumberland won’t be his last.

Texas yachtsman Bill Picot said he and his crew had a great time in his 30-foot Liberator catamaran powered by two Mercury Racing 300R engines.

“The event and the lake itself were great – the race, which I believe was about 105 miles, was awesome,” Picot said. “The only thing that sucked was that there were a lot of logs in the water as the lake was high due to the spring rains. The locals told me that everything is fine in July. I seen on the Lake Cumberland FB page where alot of guys lost lower units etc this weekend because of this.Anyway we would go back next year for sure.

“Loved the boat start at the shotgun pace of the poker race – it was fun,” he continued. “I also loved that the trips between stops were long which allowed us to stretch the boat and roll it hard.”

Hoefling, who lives in Indiana and brought his brand new Outerlimits Offshore Powerboats 39 GTX to the event, said he had fun running the boat, despite damage to the lower units of his transmissions. by debris in the water.

Boats such as Baja Marine, Cigarette Racing Team, DCB, Donzi Marine, Eliminator Boats, Fountain Powerboats, MTI, Midnight Express, Nor-Tech, Outerlimits Offshore Powerboats, Sunsation Boats and many more have participated in the Lake Cumberland Thunder Run.

In addition to this year’s Thunder Run entertainment, another Indiana performance boater, Nick Evans, gave away a 26-foot American offshore catamaran as part of his promotion on the Recovered Money YouTube channel. Owner of a Nor-Tech Hi-Performance Boats 50ft catamaran, Evans announced the winner of the giveaway at Saturday’s awards night and the lucky boater was Brian Belanger of Verona, Ky.

“I would like to thank Justin and Dan for allowing us to do the giveaway on their poker run and thank everyone who helped make this happen,” Evans said.

Lucas said he was glad everyone had fun and were safe.

“Things have been going well overall this year,” said a rather exhausted Lucas. “We had a decent turnout – I think we ended up with 92 boats in total. There was still some debris in the water, but overall it was less than in 2021.”

Related stories
Lake Cumberland Thunder Run On Track with Star Power and More
Lake Cumberland Thunder Run expects strong attendance

]]>
It’s time to ditch the government’s grandiose and expensive ferry strategy and switch to catamarans https://saltwaterconnections.org/its-time-to-ditch-the-governments-grandiose-and-expensive-ferry-strategy-and-switch-to-catamarans/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/its-time-to-ditch-the-governments-grandiose-and-expensive-ferry-strategy-and-switch-to-catamarans/ The MV Pentalina I NOTE your report on the latest state of the ferry crisis (“Documents reveal Scotland ferry crisis will cost £1.5bn to solve”, June 12). An immediate improvement would result from the purchase of the Pentalina from Pentland Ferries, at a very modest price of £5-7 million. Given the average age of Calmac’s […]]]>

The MV Pentalina

I NOTE your report on the latest state of the ferry crisis (“Documents reveal Scotland ferry crisis will cost £1.5bn to solve”, June 12).

An immediate improvement would result from the purchase of the Pentalina from Pentland Ferries, at a very modest price of £5-7 million. Given the average age of Calmac’s fleet, the idea that a ship launched 14 years ago is too old is laughable. The Pentalina is perfectly suited to the tracks of Arran or Mull, both crossings of less than an hour. She carries around 14 crew but without crew accommodation and a large catering staff, which are not needed on such short journeys. With two shore-based crew shifts, an 18-hour-a-day service could be achieved similar to that provided by Western Ferries at Dunoon. With crew costs per crossing halved, fuel costs reduced by around two-thirds and frequency doubled, service could be significantly improved at lower cost.

Building bigger and bigger ships that require huge infrastructure costs is not the answer. Ports aren’t getting any bigger, and while these large ships can make the passage in all weathers, docking safely is another matter. The maneuverability of the catamarans allows Pentland Ferries to operate a lucrative service in the worst stretch of water in the British Isles with minimal weather-related disruption.

Second, is there a contingency plan in case the Glen Sannox and Hull 802 is further delayed, or perhaps, as has been suggested, is not completed or not accepted by CMAL? Given the long lead times, most, if not all, equipment warranties will expire, resulting in increased costs and/or reduced reliability. If CMAL sought to refuse acceptance, it is likely that the Scottish Government, in order to save face, would force acceptance just as it forced the order of the FMEL ships without guarantees.

Third, we won’t have to wait until 2030 to solve this problem. The usual lead time for the supply of a bespoke vessel commissioned by CMAL is approximately five to six years. Pentland Ferries’ 98-car Alfred catamaran was delivered around 18 months after ordering at a cost of around £17m, maybe £20m today because these designs already exist. How many Alfreds for £500m? A policy change could solve the problem in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost.

There are so many questions to explore. Why are the Scottish Government and Transport Scotland giving CMAL so much leeway to pursue grand and expensive plans? Why did the ferry advisory committee not meet for about two and a half years before it was disbanded? Was the advice given not to the liking of Transport Scotland and CMAL? The survey more than two years ago described the CMAL as not fit for purpose and questioned its relevance. At the end of the day, it’s about the management of taxpayers’ money, and that management has been lavish.

J Patrick Maclean, Oban.

REDUCE OUR LOSSES

WITH the seemingly endless failures of Ferguson Marine, Calmac, CMAL, Caledonian MacBrayne and the “arm’s length owner”, the Scottish Government, isn’t it time to reflect and reclaim some of the shipbuilding reputation once proud of Scotland?

Instead of spending more money on the two hulks from the Port Glasgow shipyard, scrap them and get some money back. On second thought, salvage everything worth salvaging from the boats: two out-of-warranty motors, more than a few short lengths of copper wiring, and more. Then drag the carcasses down the middle of the Clyde and plant them upright, Antony Gormley style, next to the MV Captayanis, aka the Sugar Boat, all to show that common sense has finally prevailed by stopping wasting more funding on them, and as a reminder of one of the follies of the SNP during his tenure.

Take back the £20 million allocated to the upcoming “once in a lifetime referendum” fund, donate £500,000 towards the annual running costs of PS Waverly, £500,000 towards the works and running of the PS Maid of the Loch (both built at the AJ Inglis yard) and an additional £500.00 for the works and running costs of the SS Sir Walter Scott (built by Denny at Dumbarton. The remaining £18.5 million, and any additional earnings , can be paid to the NHS.

George Dale, Beth.

THERE IS NO MANDATE

NICOLA Sturgeon’s rationale for her ‘uncontested tenure’ is the result of the 2021 election at Holyrood. She forgets that she failed to secure a majority of MSPs and was forced to face the Greens, with all their baggage, to achieve the desired result. She is now using this as her main weapon to force another referendum on independence.

There is a huge flaw in his argument. Holyrood failed to elect a single Green MSP by first past the post and to make matters worse the pro-Union parties won 32% of the vote, the SNP and Greens 31% and a whopping 37% of the electorate didn’t vote at all. Given this, plus the fact that among those who did not vote, it can reasonably be assumed that many are pro-Union given the turnout and voting in 2014, then Ms Sturgeon’s main claim of a democratic majority falls at the very first hurdle.

The Supreme Court has nothing to do with it. It’s already over.

Dr Gerald Edwards, Glasgow.

SUCH A WASTE OF MONEY

I note with interest and disgust that despite massive cuts across all sectors of the Scottish economy and society, the SNP is spending £20million on a new campaign for independence.

It’s such a waste of money. That £20million could be better spent on things like education, providing textbooks, pencils, musical instruments and teachers – or new ferries that don’t go over budget or that are in dry dock because they can’t operate due to even more wasted money.

The SNP complains that Scotland has a huge deficit. It does. However, it is not how much the SNP complains that Westminster is to blame. How can he say that when he has been in power for over 14 years and the situation is still the same? It does not mean anything.

Just think what railway workers, teachers, police and council workers and anyone you can think of could do with £20million.

Valerie Stewart, East Kilbride.

THE TRADE UNION PARTIES ARE GROUPING UP

ANDY Maciver is absolutely right about his bleak prognosis for the Scottish Conservatives if they don’t form a new political party, separate from the English Tories – just as the Welsh Conservative Party predicts (“Douglas Ross’s only option is to create a new party”, June 12). The Scottish Conservatives are judged not only on the misbehavior of Westminster governance, but also on their policy (muscular unionism) of distant London ministers taking precedence over Holyrood.

Where I disagree with Mr Maciver is with his assertion that no other party in Holyrood would ‘work with the Tories, let alone support a Tory government’. We can already see in local government a putative British nationalist coalition (Labour, Tories and LibDems). I have no doubt that these parties would form a Red/Blue/Yellow coalition government if they could somehow garner enough elected officials. But without straying from drag anchors like Boris Johnson and Sir Keir Starmer, the dial looks stuck.

GR Weir, Ochiltree.

PROBLEMS WITH THE BREXIT DEFICIT

The use of the mantra of modernization seduces an audience delighted with the hope of improving its future economic prospects.

It carries much the same traction as the PM’s sunny highland reference to paint a picture of a rosier future. But beneath these two siren songs lurk hidden dangers that threaten workers’ well-being and economic prospects.

The story of the sunny highlands now returns as the achievement of Brexit has traded our trading relationship with the single market, where we once enjoyed preferential treatment, for the uncertainties of trying to strike deals with partners alternatives to fill the gaps left by skipping ship from EU.

Modernization usually leads to more mechanization and downsizing. This is very often accompanied by the generalization of lighter regulations, creating an increase in temporary contracts and a reduction in job security.

We are seeing these two developments in the Brexit deficit and the standoff between rail companies and their workforces.

No wonder we are nostalgic for what we had.

Denis Bruce, Bishopbriggs.

MISS A BEAT WITH ROLLING STONES

Reading the Spotlight article on the Rolling Stones’ current tour (“The Stones Deliver Certainty in a Chaotic World,” June 12), I was disappointed and surprised at the lack of mention of their new drummer. He was in the photo, but that seemed to be the extent of your acknowledgment of his existence.

I read the article several times just in case I missed a mention, but no. I would have thought that landing the role of the Rolling Stones’ new drummer, replacing the legendary Charlie Watts, would merit at least a line or two, but not even a name check. Why?

Gail Herrigan, Glasgow.

POPULAR OVERLOAD

IN the heated debate over climate change, no one mentions the elephant in the room. Today, the world population is eight billion. A hundred years ago it was 1.9 billion. Then three billion in 1960 and 6.1 billion in 2000. By 2050 it could be 9.8 billion and 11.2 billion by 2100. Politicians spending trillions of pounds trying to cut gas emissions greenhouse as the population grows is like trying to empty a bath with a teaspoon while the tap is still running.

Clark Cross, Linlithgow.

]]>
The United States Sailing Grand Prix is ​​coming to Chicago this weekend; “Going at those top speeds, it makes you feel alive” https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-united-states-sailing-grand-prix-is-coming-to-chicago-this-weekend-going-at-those-top-speeds-it-makes-you-feel-alive/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 01:29:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-united-states-sailing-grand-prix-is-coming-to-chicago-this-weekend-going-at-those-top-speeds-it-makes-you-feel-alive/ CHICAGO (SCS) — Sail like you’ve never seen it before. High tech and high speed, the International SailGP League makes its first ever stop in Chicago for the T-Mobile United States Sail Grand Prix this weekend CBS 2’s Jackie Kostek takes you into the world of SailGP and Lake Michigan before the races start this […]]]>

CHICAGO (SCS) — Sail like you’ve never seen it before. High tech and high speed, the International SailGP League makes its first ever stop in Chicago for the T-Mobile United States Sail Grand Prix this weekend

CBS 2’s Jackie Kostek takes you into the world of SailGP and Lake Michigan before the races start this weekend at Navy Pier.

Clear, calm and not a cloud in the sky; perfect conditions for taking off.

The nine identical International League SailGP F50 catamarans don’t sail so much as they fly – on carbon fiber foils reaching under the hulls, reaching speeds of just over 60 miles per hour.

“Going at those top speeds, it makes you feel alive,” said CJ Perez, the only woman on Team USA and the league’s youngest athlete at 18.

But getting to that happy state of feeling alive takes a lot of work.

“Big process, big team effort,” said Team Canada grinder Tom Ramshaw.

Inside the Team Canada hangar, the athletes and shore crew are busy, essentially reassembling the boat before it can head for the water. At around 235 pounds each, the foils are even more impressive on land, with edges so sharp the crew must wear protective gloves to hoist them into place.

“Most of the work, even as a sailor like me, is ashore,” Ramshaw said. “When you sail, you do the fun part.”

It is a process of several hours to get to this point where the boats come out of the shed. These things weigh around 4,000 pounds and are almost ready to set sail.

The sails, or “wings”, are hoisted and attached by a crane before the entire boat floats on and into the lake.

The sail is remarkably light, made mostly of carbon fiber. You can see how it’s shaped like an airplane wing, and it’s what gives lift to the boat as it moves into the wind.

When the boats are in the water, cutting through the wind, sailing becomes a high-level sport.

“Every maneuver everyone has to cross to the other side, and that’s a really fun part because you have all the G-forces around you and sometimes people fly off the boat,” Perez said. “We’re tied down, but some people almost get whipped off the boat. You end up with a few big bruises.”

This is SailGP’s first race at Skyline Stadium in Chicago. The course is tight and stretches between Navy Pier and Adler Planetarium.

Lake Michigan will also be SailGP’s first freshwater championship, which Perez says could add an element of surprise. But one thing is certain: when these boats race, they will do the same in your heart.

“You get so much adrenaline when you’re sailing these boats, you have no idea what’s really going on until a few days later,” Perez said.

But Perez says it’s worth it. After all, what else on earth could make you feel so alive?

If you can’t make it to the lake this weekend, you can watch the United States Sailing Grand Prix live on CBS Sports Network Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Check with your local cable or satellite provider which channel to find on CBS Sports Network.

]]>
An impatient sailor’s yacht is almost sucked UNDER THE car ferry https://saltwaterconnections.org/an-impatient-sailors-yacht-is-almost-sucked-under-the-car-ferry/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:50:32 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/an-impatient-sailors-yacht-is-almost-sucked-under-the-car-ferry/ Impatient sailor’s yacht is nearly sucked UNDER the car ferry as shocked tourists watch Seaman, in his 60s, had tried to ram the Sandbanks chain ferry into Poole Harbor Instead, he was swept away by the tide and swept away in the vortex of swirling water. The fiasco lasted about half an hour until a […]]]>

Impatient sailor’s yacht is nearly sucked UNDER the car ferry as shocked tourists watch

  • Seaman, in his 60s, had tried to ram the Sandbanks chain ferry into Poole Harbor
  • Instead, he was swept away by the tide and swept away in the vortex of swirling water.
  • The fiasco lasted about half an hour until a diving catamaran arrived on the scene

It’s the terrifying moment when an impatient sailor’s yacht is nearly sucked under a car ferry as horrified tourists watch.

The 70-year-old sailor had tried to beat the Sandbanks chain ferry service into Poole Harbor by steering his 30ft sailboat ahead of him.

But instead, it was swept away by the tide and swept away in the vortex of swirling water produced by the much larger ship.

Ferry passengers and tourists on the dock watched in horror as the yacht wedged against the side of the 240ft long ferry and nearly dragged underneath.

The pensioner had to get on the ferry because of the risk of sinking his yacht.

The 70-year-old sailor had tried to beat the Sandbanks chain ferry service into Poole Harbor by steering his 30ft sailboat ahead of him.

A passing RIB then attempted to rescue the sailor, but also got stuck.

The fiasco lasted about half an hour until a diving catamaran arrived on the scene and threw a rope to the dinghy and towed it to safety.

The crew then returned and freed the yacht from the ferry.

Andrzej Bubez, a computer engineer, was among the pedestrians whose ferry crossing was delayed by the tragedy.

He said: “The tide was coming in fast – its flow there is just amazing. The sailor attempted to outrun the ferry and the ferry sounded its horn to warn him.

“It was constantly screaming. At that point he tried to go around the back of the ferry, but it was too late. He collided with the ferry. If he had started to sink, it could have been even worse.

“A passing RIB tried to help only to succumb to the tide which pinned it to the ferry.

“A large diving catamaran then threw a rope at them and fortunately had the power to pull them out.”

The fiasco lasted about half an hour until a diving catamaran arrived on the scene and threw a rope to the din-gy and towed it to safety.

The fiasco lasted about half an hour until a diving catamaran arrived on the scene and threw a rope to the din-gy and towed it to safety.

A spokesperson for Swanage Motor Road and Ferry Company, which operates the ferry, added: “It appears the skipper was inexperienced and did not understand the conditions and tried to race the ferry to get ahead of it. and changed his mind at the last minute.

“Fortunately everyone went home, but it could have been worse – it’s something that happens every season. We are just relieved that no one was injured and service was able to resume after 20 minutes.

Trever Small was at the helm of the ‘Rocket’ catamaran taking divers to port when the collision occurred.

He said: ‘We were on the way out when the boat collided with the ferry. It was life threatening – he could have been shot under.

“There was no one else on the scene, so we had to help. Fortunately, my boat is powerful enough – it has 90 hp.

“The tide was pushing him into the ferry so we had to get him off – I threw the towline at him and then the ferry lowered a ladder to get him on board.

“I wasn’t going to tow the boat with him on board – there was a chance he capsized and got sucked in.”

Poole RNLI arrived on the scene after the rescue and collected the boat before returning it to its owner.

]]>
The ‘better worst idea’: Race from Washington to Alaska for the return of motorless boats https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-better-worst-idea-race-from-washington-to-alaska-for-the-return-of-motorless-boats/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 21:34:32 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-better-worst-idea-race-from-washington-to-alaska-for-the-return-of-motorless-boats/ A North West adventure race that some are calling “the best worst idea” is back after a long pandemic hiatus. The 2022 Race to Alaska for motorless boats dropped at the first light of dawn on Monday amid strong winds in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, conditions the organizers as “between seasick and dangerous”. […]]]>

A North West adventure race that some are calling “the best worst idea” is back after a long pandemic hiatus. The 2022 Race to Alaska for motorless boats dropped at the first light of dawn on Monday amid strong winds in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, conditions the organizers as “between seasick and dangerous”.

The race spans 750 miles from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan, Alaska. The first leg, dubbed “The Proving Ground”, covers the 40 miles to Victoria, British Columbia. The name was well chosen this year because the heavy weather quickly capsized three small boats and dismasted a fourth. All crew members were rescued unharmed.

At least half a dozen captains decided to delay their departures and stay in port until the winds and waves died down. The race high command gave all competitors an extra 24 hours to cross the strait during the qualifying stage so no one would feel pressured to row or sail in dangerous conditions. This created a 5 p.m. Wednesday deadline to reach Victoria’s Inner Harbor unassisted to qualify for the full race north.

On the eve of the start, Race to Alaska co-founder Jake Beattie said the wait for that day had been long. It’s been nearly three years since maritime adventurers last tried to find safe passage to Alaska.

“The running community and the fans of the race are almost thrilled at how excited they are to bring this back online and come back ready to race again,” Beattie said in an interview Sunday at a pre-race block party. on the Port Townsend waterfront. .

The closure of the Canada-US border to non-essential crossings had to be relaxed for the race to resume. In addition, small isolated towns along the route to the north had to welcome visitors.

Race to Alaska participants of varying crew shapes and sizes prepare for the 750-mile unpowered, unassisted boat race from Port Townsend to Ketchikan on June 12, 2022.

Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

“The last thing we wanted to do was be the event that took COVID from the Seattle area and put it into remote communities across Canada,” said Beattie, who is the executive director of the Northwest Maritime Center. .

Beattie and his co-conspirators at the Port Townsend non-profit have deliberately designed this race to have as few rules as possible – and this year, in the sixth edition of the icy and wild marathon, a mandatory checkpoint was thrown overboard.

“We decided that the thing we could do to freshen up the Race to Alaska conundrum was to remove one of the rules – one of the few rules – which is that you have to go through Seymour Narrows,” said beatie.

Seymour Narrows is a whirlpool-filled tidal channel on the Inside Passage, halfway to Vancouver Island. The alternative for approved ocean racers is to go out into the open and unforgiving North Pacific. A mandatory mid-course checkpoint remains in Bella Bella, BC.

A permanent rule is that any size boat with any crew can participate in the race, but the boat must be unpowered. It only means sailing power or muscle power. In addition, competitors must be self-sufficient. No hunting boats with mechanics and fresh supplies are allowed.

Beattie says one of his earliest witty encapsulations of the race still holds: “It’s like the Iditarod, but with a chance of drowning or being eaten by a bear or run over by a freighter.”

It seemed doable for first-time Race to Alaska crew member Steve Colman, who flew in from New South Wales, Australia.

“That’s the lure of adventure – uncertain outcomes,” Colman said as he packed up supplies for the trip on Sunday. “If everything was pedestrian, we wouldn’t want to be there.”

Colman is traveling with Australian friend Bob Killip and Captain Stuart Sugden on a second-hand 20ft recreational sailboat bought online without seeing it in Vancouver.

“We’ve won the race if we take it to Alaska as far as we’re concerned,” Killip said. “And see bears, see orcas and meet a few people, have fun and be safe.”

Thirty-six teams from as close as Victoria and Friday Harbor, from Portland and landlocked Missoula, to as far away as France and Australia have started the full race. It’s mostly a mix of trimarans, catamarans, and sailboats (aka monohulls), along with two kayaks and a half-dozen expedition rowboats. No stand up paddle will compete this year, for a change. Nine people attempt the race alone.

Solo riders include Doug Shoup of Sedro Woolley, Washington, who is making his third attempt to reach Ketchikan, this time with a brand new 19-foot wooden boat he built himself last winter. It competes under the name Team Perseverance.

“It’s taken a long time to get here. And I’m going to get there,” Shoup promised as he made last-minute adjustments to his modified Angus RowCruiser model boat on Sunday. “I put a lot into it when you consider I built two boats, not one. A lot of practice. I lost a ton of weight.”

Now on the big screen as well as on the water

For earthlings who don’t want to brave the elements and exhaustion, there is another way to experience the race to Alaska and meet its elders. Filmmaker Zach Carver made a self-titled 98-minute documentary about the race. It is now showing in select theaters and will air later.

Carver chose a concise description attributed to Race Boss Daniel Evans to serve as the film’s promotional tagline. “The best of the worst ideas,” fits because of the incredible human potential on display, Carver said.

“The straight line is a flair for the absurd to some degree,” Carver said in a Waterside interview. “It’s an absurd competition that also appeals to something very deep and beautiful within us. It’s that balance.”

When the starting gun was fired on Monday, Carver joined a global subculture known as “tracker junkies.” These people will follow runners bound for Ketchikan, now reduced to points on an online map corresponding to their GPS beacon signals. You can overlay real-time weather, ship speed, and then let your imagination run wild for what teams might face en route to Southeast Alaska.

As in the past, the winning boat wins $10,000. Second place wins a set of steak knives.

Quick separation expected this year

Carver and Beattie said they expected this year’s race to split fairly quickly into two groups. A group of experienced ocean racers at the front will sail hard day and night on vessels specially designed to go fast. Those in this group who manage to avoid catastrophic collisions with unseen driftwood logs are expected to finish in Ketchikan early next week. The majority of teams that enter it for the personal challenge and perhaps a life-changing experience will be far behind and usually take two to three weeks to reach the finish line.

Team Pure and Wild, a 44ft racing monohull, earned bragging rights by winning the first leg to Victoria this year. The Seattle-based team is led by two-time Olympic medalist (sailing) Jonathan McKee and its crew includes the skipper of the 2019 Race to Alaska-winning team Angry Beaver.

After a roughly two-day break to make repairs or adjustments, racing resumes in earnest at noon on Thursday for Stage 2, the remaining 710-mile trek from Victoria to Alaska.

A team named Mad Dog Racing set the course record in 2016 with three days and 20 hours of non-stop sailing on the second leg. The three-member team completed their fast-paced voyage with barely a night’s sleep on a 32-foot high-performance catamaran without a cabin.

In 2019, only 25 of the 35 teams that started the full race made it to Ketchikan.

]]>
Residents of Nochikuppam oppose temple demolition https://saltwaterconnections.org/residents-of-nochikuppam-oppose-temple-demolition/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 16:44:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/residents-of-nochikuppam-oppose-temple-demolition/ More than 300 Nochikuppam residents sat down through Friday night to make sure the Sri Ganga Bhavani Amman temple along Loop Road was not demolished. They shouted slogans urging the state government to stop the proposed demolition. They brought catamarans and formed a kind of wall on the road to protect the temple from demolition. […]]]>

More than 300 Nochikuppam residents sat down through Friday night to make sure the Sri Ganga Bhavani Amman temple along Loop Road was not demolished.

They shouted slogans urging the state government to stop the proposed demolition. They brought catamarans and formed a kind of wall on the road to protect the temple from demolition.

And their blockade paid off as officials from the Tamil Nadu Urban Habitat Development Board (TNUHDB), the police and the tax authorities, who had gone to the fishing village to tear down the temple, agreed to await the outcome of the legal proceedings. .

“They were implicated in the file filed by a resident of the village declaring that the temple was an encroachment. But as their petition was numbered, we agreed to wait and notify the Madras High Court of the developments,” a senior council official said.

K. Bharathi from Nochikuppam said that the temple has existed for more than 50 years and it was definitely there in 2014 when the Tamil Nadu Slum Clearance Board (currently TNUHDB) demolished their old houses to build new blocks. “It’s on the plan. We will accept final orders from the High Court. But as residents, we believe our religious rights are being violated. The temple is not an encroachment. It was built with contributions from locals. Besides the Amman shrine, there are shrines for Lord Vinayaka and Navagraham in the temple,” he said.

Kabaddi Maran, another resident, said the state government, headed by Chief Minister MK Stalin, had done a lot for the temples. “Since we were not consulted before the Court made the orders, we now hope that the judges will be lenient with our feelings. The government too should help us, ”he added.

]]>