Catamarans – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 10:48:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://saltwaterconnections.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Catamarans – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ 32 32 “The Maltese are welcome in Sicily – for the right reasons” https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-maltese-are-welcome-in-sicily-for-the-right-reasons/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 09:22:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-maltese-are-welcome-in-sicily-for-the-right-reasons/ Maltese tourists in Sicily have hit the headlines in the Sicilian media. It has been reported that over 2,000 passengers have disembarked at Pozzallo from the two Virtu Ferries catamarans, the MV Saint John Paul II and MV John of Valletta, for the weekend of Black Friday. Another 4,500 passengers and 1,300 vehicles made it […]]]>

Maltese tourists in Sicily have hit the headlines in the Sicilian media. It has been reported that over 2,000 passengers have disembarked at Pozzallo from the two Virtu Ferries catamarans, the MV Saint John Paul II and MV John of Valletta, for the weekend of Black Friday.

Another 4,500 passengers and 1,300 vehicles made it to Pozzallo over Christmas and New Years. While shopping was not the main reason to visit Sicily, Catania today pointed out that Christmas shopping played a role. However, most of the tourists were after “a po ‘di relax”(A moment of relaxation), says the newspaper.

Malta’s deployment of the COVID vaccine was also welcomed, with the newspaper noting that all passengers arriving on Virtu Ferries ships have a vaccination certificate “asshole doppia(Double dose), often also a booster, and a negative rapid test is carried out before departure from Malta.

Social distancing, the newspaper notes, is observed aboard Virtu ships, during check-in, embarkation and disembarkation. He also commented positively on Virtu’s policy of “Keep Travel Simple” (Con Virtu Ferries is easier) and on family-oriented departure times.

Virtu Ferries claims that Maltese visitors are clearly welcome and are viewed very favorably by the Sicilian tourism industry, with hotels and restaurants increasingly interested in the Maltese market. This is particularly the case in the provinces of Ragusa, Catania and Syracuse.

The company also believes that as COVID is still on the agenda and people are increasingly reluctant to spend a family ski vacation in northern Europe, the slopes of Mount Etna, just 90 minutes from Pozzallo, could prove to be an interesting alternative this winter.

He also notes that international freight costs have skyrocketed over the past year and that Maltese trading companies are increasingly turning to Sicily for all types of goods, which is an added bonus for Sicilian entrepreneurs.

Virtu is positively contributing to this increase in trade between the two islands by operating two ships on a daily schedule with multiple trips per week and, at the same time, keeping freight rates at pre-COVID levels, against the international trend. Maltese exporters also benefit from this stable freight costs.

For the aforementioned reasons, Virtu Ferries claims that just as Maltese are welcome in Sicily, so are Sicilians in Malta.

The company recently announced very attractive offers for January and February and launched its Easter program.

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Why you should try charter sailing in the British Virgin Islands https://saltwaterconnections.org/why-you-should-try-charter-sailing-in-the-british-virgin-islands/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:23:52 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/why-you-should-try-charter-sailing-in-the-british-virgin-islands/ Sparkling waters, cool breezes and all the snorkeling and cocktails you could ask for. Embrace the freedom of sailing through the British Virgin Islands on a private chartered catamaran. Share this article “TIt’s time to take off those monkey suits and put on your swimwear. The playful request is courtesy of Captain Richard Hallett, a […]]]>

Sparkling waters, cool breezes and all the snorkeling and cocktails you could ask for. Embrace the freedom of sailing through the British Virgin Islands on a private chartered catamaran.

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“TIt’s time to take off those monkey suits and put on your swimwear. The playful request is courtesy of Captain Richard Hallett, a South African from Zimbabwe who, along with his wife and first mate Shannon, is the crew of the 50ft Moorings catamaran my family has chartered for a nine sail. days in the British Virgin. He is. We’ve been on our yacht for an hour when the suggestion is thrown to our two school-aged sons. Unsurprisingly, the challenge was met with flying colors. So after a 30 minute cruise to Norman Island from Road Town, Tortola (the capital of the BVI, our starting point after flying into its Beef Island airport), we anchor off a calm bay called Treasure Point and we are preparing to dive inside three caves at water level. Almost immediately we come across colorful schools of parrotfish, yellowtail snappers, and striped sergeants major, as well as vibrant clusters of orange coral that the boys love to take photos of with my underwater camera.

Back on board, our captain offers us two options: a sunset in a chic restaurant by the water called the Bight or cocktails and a cliff jump at Willy T, an oil tanker transformed into a floating dive bar, where you can draw spirits from six o’clock. person “shot-skis” (long wooden snow skis with shallow holes to fit shot glasses). We go for the latter and take the plunge, which ends up being the first of the many on-the-go choices that set the mood for this kind of vacation. “The beauty of BVI,” said Captain Richard later that night, “is that you can steer your boat in any direction and have an amazing experience just a few sails.”

Indeed, just like the Choose Your Own Adventure books that I loved as a kid – the ’80s series where you take on the role of the protagonist and make choices to determine the outcome of the plot – so does it. the same goes for those great sailing vacations that we ‘ve found ourselves on. If you decide to dive the wreck, turn to page 51. If you want to sail to the beach bar, turn to page 86. The only difference is that instead of the italics at the bottom of each page, our choices are handpicked by our seasoned captain, whose encyclopedic knowledge of the territory is already proven.

Left: Cow Wreck Beach Bar, where we stopped for a rum punch.  Right: the Baths, a labyrinth of rocks on Virgin Gorda formed by an underwater volcano.

The other advantage? Now is the perfect time to charter a yacht in the Caribbean. Thanks in large part to the pandemic, the BVI is eerily calm right now, which means you’ll find empty anchorages, secluded dive sites, and slices of white sand beaches that will fill all your Tom Hanks. Castaway fancy. Add to that the opening of a handful of brand-new (or recently improved) resorts and restaurants across the land and you’ve got a recipe for, dare I say, the perfect Caribbean vacation.

The next morning we feast on French toast, bacon and fresh tropical fruit, one of three meals a day which, along with booze and water toys like paddle boards, kayaks and a 12 foot outboard – motor dinghy – is included in a Moorings charter with crew. So, mimosa pineapple poured, we await the captain’s daily briefing. He tells us that we can dive in a nearby archipelago called the Indians (widely regarded as one of the best dive sites in the British Virgin Islands); search for ballast stones, sea glass and natural salt crystals on Salt Island; or explore the white sands of Cooper Island, a 480-acre islet that’s home to a small, family-friendly resort, but not much else. We raise our hands for the three of us and set off in the BVI breeze.

After a full day of unhindered exploration, even our dinner later that night is a surprise choice. As we are anchored off Manchioneel Bay on Cooper Island, we are greeted by a local fisherman who walks by our yacht and asks if we would like some freshly caught lobster. It’s a request my wife and I can hardly pass up, so we’re handed two clawless crustaceans, which Shannon expertly cooks in the kitchen, with garlic mashed potatoes and prosciutto-wrapped asparagus.

We didn't see another soul at Sandy Spit, a one acre cay surrounded by clear blue water.

This is how things go for the duration of our trip, but some choices, it must be said, are easier than others. “Are we going to go back to Virgin Gorda, Daddy?” My eight year old son Tyler asks. My family was there for the last time in 2019, on a similar crewed charter which created memories galore, so we asked the captain to sail northeast en route to the BVI’s third largest island, as well named because Columbus thought it looked like an overweight woman lying on her side when he discovered it in 1493.

After an almost obligatory walk through the baths – a watery maze of boulders the size of a school bus formed by an ancient submarine volcano – our lunch options on land are presented to us: a barbecue on top of a hill called Hog Heaven where the panoramic view, we’re told, is as good as the smoked brisket, or the fresh seafood and island-inspired tapas at Sugar Mill, a beachfront restaurant at the recently reopened Rosewood Little Dix Bay. . This is one of our toughest decisions so far, but the payoff comes as soon as we dig into tuna belly plates. tataki and seafood paella at a cool table by the sand in Little Dix.

In fact, the resort is one of a trio we are visiting who have either shone or completely rebuilt their properties following the devastating effects of Hurricane Irma in 2017. Reopened in December 2020, this Caribbean Grand Lady received a massive $ 200 million renovation. – a Herculean effort to restore its rustic-luxurious look as Little Dix was practically blown away by the storm. Another was Saba Rock, a luxury resort on an acre bay where Captain Richard and Shannon took us for a cocktail one evening. And the third was Oil Nut Bay, a 300-acre community on Virgin Gorda’s North Sound where its sprawling villas (including some that rent $ 30,000 a night) looked chicer than ever.

“So where to go? Captain Richard asks after returning to the yacht. At this point, we realize that wherever he suggests, the jackpot will likely be hit, so we rely on his expertise and sail north, past schools of wild dolphins and above galaxies of starfish. golden. Today’s destination is Anegada, a flat atoll where we snorkel in a beautiful coral area aptly named Flash of Beauty, eat blackened mahi-mahi tacos at Anegada Beach Club and drink rum punch at Cow Wreck Beach Bar while the boys play on its seemingly endless beach.

It turns out to be yet another adventure-filled day; Of course, Richard has a few other anchors in his arsenal that underscore the territory’s current throwback vibe. He sailed us west to snorkel at a popular dive site called Diamond Reef, a place that is usually teeming with shallow-water divers, but today there isn’t another swimmer in sight. Next, we drop anchor off Sandy Spit, an uninhabited one acre cay that’s only home to three spindly palm trees, piles of sun-drenched corals and my family of four. Then he crashes us off White Bay on Jost Van Dyke, and we’re happy to be one of only four boats in a cove that’s normally packed with charters. We can’t believe our eyes, so after swimming to shore we head for some nutmeg pain relievers and throw rings at Soggy Dollar Bar, a beloved BVI rum shack where we barely have to wait for our second (and third) round of cocktails.

With seven days behind us, our charter has officially reached critical mass on the adventure ladder, so the captain asks one last question for the end of our trip: we can stay overnight in Jost or sail to Tortola for dinner. on the back deck in a secluded bay called Smugglers Cove. Still a sailor, my wife chooses the cruise, so the four of us climb the stairs to the fly bridge, where we enjoy the wind in our hair, the sun on our faces and a final champagne toast to a destination filled with glorious choice.

In the British Virgin Islands, a four-cabin crewed Moorings catamaran starts at $ 2,500 per person per week, meals and alcohol included; unmanned, rates start at $ 1,375 per person.


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Three of the best sailing destinations for beginners in 2022 https://saltwaterconnections.org/three-of-the-best-sailing-destinations-for-beginners-in-2022/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 10:52:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/three-of-the-best-sailing-destinations-for-beginners-in-2022/ Top Tips for Sunsail Newbies If you’ve always wanted to sail, but have no experience on board yachts, planning a trip can be a daunting prospect. The specialist operator, Sunsail, offers a number of options to prepare you for being on the water – and you can do as much or as little of the […]]]>

Top Tips for Sunsail Newbies

If you’ve always wanted to sail, but have no experience on board yachts, planning a trip can be a daunting prospect. The specialist operator, Sunsail, offers a number of options to prepare you for being on the water – and you can do as much or as little of the boating as you want. They also have global bases, so you can maximize the time you spend at sea:

1. Take a course: If you’ve never cruised before, try the Competent Crew course – by the end of it you will know how to handle a boat and be a useful member of the crew. He is a great confidence builder.

2. Hire a skipper: Alternatively, you can simply hire your own yacht from our fleet with a skipper who will come with you and navigate the boat.

3. Consider the size: Sunsail offers monohull sailboats from 34 to 52 feet and catamarans from 40 to 50 feet. You can opt for a bareboat vacation, where you set off and make the most of your skipper’s local knowledge, or you can join one of our flotilla vacations.

4. Try a flotilla: Flotilla sailing is a lot of fun – people love the social aspect, as well as having the support of a leading crew to help them throughout the trip. It’s a really exciting way to get started in sailing.

Find out more online at sunsail.co.uk


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IoT and AI take center stage – IoT World Today https://saltwaterconnections.org/iot-and-ai-take-center-stage-iot-world-today/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:33:02 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/iot-and-ai-take-center-stage-iot-world-today/ CES 2022 kicks off this week as established tech companies and startups head to Las Vegas to showcase their latest innovations CES 2022 kicks off this week as established tech companies and startups travel to Las Vegas to showcase their latest innovations that the market can expect to see over the next year. The name […]]]>

CES 2022 kicks off this week as established tech companies and startups head to Las Vegas to showcase their latest innovations

CES 2022 kicks off this week as established tech companies and startups travel to Las Vegas to showcase their latest innovations that the market can expect to see over the next year.

The name of the big show has evolved over the years, from the Consumer Electronics Show to CES International and now to CES.

While many of the products on display will eventually end up in the hands of consumers, consumers do not attend the event as it is aimed directly at those who sell or distribute to consumers or other businesses.

In the days leading up to the pandemic, CES would typically attract around 200,000 attendees, although following last year’s virtual show approaching, the number of in-person attendees expected this year is unknown.

CES was scheduled to take place Jan. 5-8, but the Consumer Technology Association (CTA), which runs the show, reduced it by one day to close at the end of Jan. 7 due to the latest variant of the coronavirus. .

In recent weeks, many companies have moved away from showing or attending in person and have moved on to virtual exhibitions, including General Motors, Proctor & Gamble, Google, Amazon, T-Mobile, AT&T, Casio, HP, Twitter, Motorola, Lenovo, iHeartMedia, AMD, Panasonic, Hisense, Brunswick, Nvidia and Pinterest.

However, there are still more than 2,100 exhibiting companies, according to the CTA.

These are over 100 healthcare companies, including 3M, Abbott, Colgate-Palmolive, Dassault Systèmes, OMRON Healthcare, OrCam, Penumbra, Philips, Sleep Number and Variowell.

Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in products ranging from delivery robots to connected vehicles are very present throughout the show.

One of the novelties of CES is a scheduled high-speed self-driving car racing competition. The Indy Autonomous Challenge at Las Vegas Motor Speedway brings together nine racing teams from 19 universities in eight countries. Track testing begins today to train for the weekend race.

At the annual Eureka Park, notable for showcasing start-up and highly innovative businesses, some regions come together under a common umbrella.

For example, the Japan pavilion at Eureka Park is expected to showcase 52 burgeoning Japanese tech startups, including six that were named at the CES 2022 Innovation Awards. The companies, backed by the Japan Foreign Trade Organization, are showcasing products including a handheld camera with LTE connectivity, a non-invasive blood glucose meter using a mid-infrared laser, and a small, autonomous delivery robot.

The Seoul Metropolitan Government is also supporting a CES 2022 Seoul Pavilion team, comprising 25 startups, including six named in the CES 2022 Innovation Awards.

At the French Tech Pavilion in Eureka Park, 140 startups plan to showcase their innovations ranging from a miniature biodegradable paper battery that can provide clean energy for disposable medical devices to a fast hydrogen-powered catamaran.

At every CES, companies present live demonstrations with volunteer attendees, and this time is no exception. For example, Korea’s iMediSync plans to offer a free 10-minute brain screening to provide analysis of brain waves and heart rate variability. The AI-based detection platform aims to identify the early detection of several mental health issues, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Here’s a quick look at some of the products showcased at CES:

  • Ekin plans to introduce an automatic and mobile license plate reader, among other smart city products powered by artificial intelligence. License plate recognition can identify the plates of moving and parked cars and provide instant comparisons with wanted or stolen vehicles.
  • SteadySense should introduce a smart patch that continuously measures body temperature for early detection of infectious diseases. The connected patch then sends notifications via a mobile application.
  • Somalytics Introduces a small capacitive sensor built into a flexible, three-dimensional floor mat that can observe, monitor and report human well-being factors including foot presence, gait and pressure targeting the healthcare market. The sensors are made of paper and require little energy.
  • Ubtech, an artificial intelligence humanoid robotics company, presents a new portfolio of healthcare robots comprising a self-driving chair and a walking assist robot with an integrated deployable seat, biometric monitoring and route mapping.
  • phiar plans to provide a platform for vehicles to use real-time augmentation based on advanced artificial intelligence powered by computer vision. In-vehicle cameras and sensors provide an enhanced navigation system to the driver.
  • Bobcat Doosan is planning a live demonstration of its smart technology involving remote operations using Verizon’s 5G network. A compact track loader should be controlled remotely by an operator in a Bobcat electric excavator cab.
  • Blickfeld plans to announce a collaboration with Genesis Design regarding 360-degree sensors in autonomous vehicles. Blickfeld’s Percept software enables object detection, classification and tracking.
  • Hiber plans to show a new version of its Hiber Easy Pulse, an asset tracking technology for monitoring assets all over the world on a monthly subscription basis.
  • Quantum operation, an IoT startup, is expected to present a non-invasive glucose bracelet monitor with the ability to record and identify changes in glucose level.

Whatever products are presented, IoT and AI technology reigns supreme at this CES.


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Fog does not put any shock absorber on the Run Around Longboat wrench https://saltwaterconnections.org/fog-does-not-put-any-shock-absorber-on-the-run-around-longboat-wrench/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 19:05:49 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/fog-does-not-put-any-shock-absorber-on-the-run-around-longboat-wrench/ While southwest Florida isn’t famous for coastal fog, it’s known to come from the Gulf of Mexico at this time of year. More often than not, it burns down in the afternoon, as with much of Thursday’s Munyan Lunch Run from Sarasota to Tampa Bay. But for today’s fun race around Longboat Key, the fog […]]]>

While southwest Florida isn’t famous for coastal fog, it’s known to come from the Gulf of Mexico at this time of year. More often than not, it burns down in the afternoon, as with much of Thursday’s Munyan Lunch Run from Sarasota to Tampa Bay.

But for today’s fun race around Longboat Key, the fog was particularly stubborn. Sarasota Bay was clear when the race began at 11:30 am, but thick fog greeted the 40-boat fleet as they attempted to clear Big Pass and enter the Gulf of Mexico. The fleet reversed course, headed north, and exited for a photoshoot, but the window was short-lived.

When the sun came out, speedonthewater.com chief photographer Pete Boden and the Longboat Key Fun Run participants took advantage. Photos by Pete Boden copyright Shoot 2 Thrill Pix.

By early afternoon, fog had blanketed Sarasota Bay.

“It usually burns down in the early afternoon,” said Ryan Beckley, organizer of the Joey Gratton Memorial New Year’s Day Fun, who ran his 24-foot Skater catamaran. “By the time we returned, the whole bay was foggy. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen Sarasota Bay still congested at 4pm.

Enjoy more images of southwest Florida from yesterday in the slideshow above.

Some of the casual event attendees returned to the docks early. Others held on and had lunch at various restaurants by the water.

“In the end, everything went well,” said Chris LaMorte, who was in charge of his 36-foot skater. “And we spent some time in the Gulf in two to three feet, which I always enjoy.”

For Brian Hoar from Vermont, who is in town for the week with his wife, Sandy, and their Statement Marine 360 ​​catamaran, the low visibility conditions were only part of the experience.

“We started out under a beautiful sun with a lot of amazing boats, and the craziest fog bank came the moment we got to Anna Marie Island,” said Hoar, one of the founders and organizers of the Lake Champlain Poker Run. “Many of us stopped for lunch on Longboat Key and had great food and service. Overall it was a nine out of 10 day’s sailing.

Editor’s Note: Look for a report on today’s Joey Gratton Memorial New Years Day fun run later today on speedonthewater.com.

Related stories
Photo essay: Munyan’s fifth annual race has everything but Munyan
Four Southwest Florida events to cap the final week of 2021


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Top 5 most viewed Bundaberg Now stories of 2021 – Bundaberg Now https://saltwaterconnections.org/top-5-most-viewed-bundaberg-now-stories-of-2021-bundaberg-now/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/top-5-most-viewed-bundaberg-now-stories-of-2021-bundaberg-now/ Keisha and Maree Baker from the Gin Gin bakery. While the Covid pandemic grabbed international headlines for most of 2021, there were still many positive stories to be discovered across the Bundaberg region. Bundaberg Now published over 2,000 articles throughout the year. Statistics are available, and the most popular stories among readers were those about […]]]>
Keisha and Maree Baker from the Gin Gin bakery.

While the Covid pandemic grabbed international headlines for most of 2021, there were still many positive stories to be discovered across the Bundaberg region.

Bundaberg Now published over 2,000 articles throughout the year.

Statistics are available, and the most popular stories among readers were those about local businesses, success and fortune.

The 5 most viewed Bundaberg Now stories of 2021

Gin Gin Bakery wins 11 awards for pies and pies – 14,285 views

The number one most read article of 2021 had all the ingredients to make a great story: local business, success and family.

Gin Gin Bakery won numerous awards at Australia’s Best Pies and Pasta Competition earlier in the year, with 11 of their delicious pastries winning a place in the national competition.

From cheese and bacon to curry, mushrooms and the delicious meat and vegetable pie, flavors of all varieties from the local bakery were showcased at the awards ceremony and Bundaberg readers Now have eaten the news!

Maree Baker took over the business with her daughter and three sons in 2019 and has said creating tasty and tasty treats is their specialty.

Read the full story here.

Bundaberg couple win $ 1 million in Gold Lotto – 13,990 views

In second place, the story of a local couple who won the first prize of the Gold Lotto, pocketing $ 1 million.

The couple said they had been playing for years using their favorite numbers and were thrilled with the victory.

High on the list were mortgage repayment plans, along with the possibility of saving money for the family.

Read the full version of this top 5 most viewed stories here.

E-scooters available for hire in time for Easter – 7,110 views

Bundaberg Now Stories
Local residents traveling on Neuron Mobility electric scooters in Bargara

News of the arrival of electric scooters in town was a hot topic for Bundaberg Now readers in 2021, with thousands engaging in a story about the launch of Neuron Mobility in the region.

The article, published in April, detailed how 250 electric scooters would be available in the Bundaberg CBD in an area bounded by the hospital, botanical gardens and tourist area of ​​East Bundaberg, as well as the foreshore of Bargara.

The zones were among the first regional sites to be targeted by Neuron Mobility, which is undertaking a 12-month trial at Bundaberg.

Read more here.

“Local Hands and Local Pride” Build Luxury Yachts – 6,753 views

Stretching 23.5 meters, the impressive luxury catamaran, the “Catalina”, was the largest construction of Coral Coast Marine Constructions, based at Bundaberg port.

The history of the construction was published in April and it was the first time the owners of Coral Coast Marine Constructions had participated in a media.

The couple started their business 17 years ago in Bundaberg after many years of boat building in Brisbane.

They celebrated their biggest project ever with the launch of the bespoke luxury motor yacht Catalina at Bundaberg harbor.

Read the full story here.

New bakery owners add a crocodile to their menu – 6,645 views

crocodile pie
Huyen Nguyen and Lam Khong introduced crocodile pie to Paradise Bakehouse.

The fifth most watched story for 2021 introduced us to the new owners of Paradise Bakehouse getting creative with their pie recipes.

Huyen Nguyen and Lam Khong say they live in a “paradise” after moving to Moore Park Beach from Western Australia earlier this year.

The big move gave the husband and wife team the opportunity to create new pie flavors like red kangaroo wine or crocodile pie.

The community has warmly welcomed the new owners who have also recently won numerous awards.

Read this top 5 most viewed stories here.


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Servo Yachts unveils new catamaran with suspended superstructure – Robb Report https://saltwaterconnections.org/servo-yachts-unveils-new-catamaran-with-suspended-superstructure-robb-report/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 14:35:04 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/servo-yachts-unveils-new-catamaran-with-suspended-superstructure-robb-report/ Forget the Dramamine. Servo Yachts has designed a whole new range of catamarans to combat seasickness. The nascent American builder, founded by David Hall, has teamed up with British studio Shuttleworth Design to develop a range of ships that glide smoothly through the water without the types of movement that typically cause seasickness in passengers. […]]]>

Forget the Dramamine. Servo Yachts has designed a whole new range of catamarans to combat seasickness.

The nascent American builder, founded by David Hall, has teamed up with British studio Shuttleworth Design to develop a range of ships that glide smoothly through the water without the types of movement that typically cause seasickness in passengers.

The latest 165-footer, dubbed the Martini 7.0, is the tallest and most advanced cat in the series to date. With a carbon fiber exterior and foam cores, the multihull has an innovative electric suspension system that adapts in real time to the height and angle of the waves.

The Martini 6.0 (photo) has the same technology as the Martini 7.0.

Servo / shuttle yacht design

In short, the two hulls of the ship are connected by four articulated scissor mechanisms positioned at each corner of the superstructure. While cruising, the superstructure can be lifted up to 12 feet and suspended safely away from rough waters.

According to the designers, Martini 7.0 can navigate an ocean swell with virtually no movement in the suspension bridge where the crew and guests are located. The new design is also said to cause less drag than traditional yachts, which means it’s faster and more efficient than conventional competitors.

On board, the main deck accommodates 10 people in four en-suite guest cabins and a full-width master suite that includes an office and gym. Crew accommodation, meanwhile, is on the lower deck, along with a galley, dive shop, and garage that can accommodate a 21-foot dinghy.

Martini 6.0

The Martini 6.0 (pictured) also has a suspended superstructure.

Servo / shuttle yacht design

Designed for outdoor entertainment, the ship features an infinity pool flanked by sunbeds aft of the main deck, as well as a lounge and jacuzzi on the upper deck.

The duo have already designed a number of prototypes of similar ships ranging from 17ft to 45ft that have been tested in the San Francisco Bay Area, as well as a 150ft concept called Martini 6.0. There also appears to be a market for this type of smooth cruiser. According to the United States National Library of Medicine, one in three people is considered very susceptible to motion sickness.

“With the Martini 7.0, I think we’ve found a way to solve seasickness and dramatically improve the boating experience so everyone can enjoy traveling the ocean,” Hall said in a comment. communicated. “I am very happy that Servo Yachts continues to push the boundaries of marine technology and transform ocean travel. “


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Navigator of the Seas Live Blog – Day 3 – Cabo San Lucas https://saltwaterconnections.org/navigator-of-the-seas-live-blog-day-3-cabo-san-lucas/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 14:58:55 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/navigator-of-the-seas-live-blog-day-3-cabo-san-lucas/ Our first port of call is Cabo San Lucas, although we don’t get there until noon. My morning routine was the same as yesterday. Wake up before the kids, head to the pool deck and enjoy the fresh air while I catch up with the blog posts. I immediately noticed that the temperature had warmed […]]]>

Our first port of call is Cabo San Lucas, although we don’t get there until noon.

My morning routine was the same as yesterday. Wake up before the kids, head to the pool deck and enjoy the fresh air while I catch up with the blog posts.

I immediately noticed that the temperature had warmed up considerably over the past two days and it was comfortable to be outside in shorts.

Once the kids got up we had breakfast in the Windjammer. We decided to go to the brainbuster trivia afterwards. Here’s a question: What begins with “e”, ends with “e”, and has a single letter?

The answer is envelope.

Navigator of the Seas sailed along the Mexican coast as we neared Cabo.

Cabo San Lucas is not a port where you will dock. Instead, guests take tender boats to shore.

We booked the Luxury Coastal Cruise for today which is a 2 hour water tour of the surrounding area.

We met at the Royal Theater and took a tender ashore before boarding a large boat for our visit. The tour classified it as a catamaran, but it looked like a giant tender boat.

There were 3 stops: the cliffside beaches of Land’s End, Lovers Beach, then the wildlife viewing.

We started out of the harbor and headed straight for Land’s End.

The rock formation is beautiful, although we basically saw it from our ship on the trip. Still, it was a closer look and included a sight of sea lions barking out a storm.

Around the rocks are beaches, including Lover’s Beach. If I were to come back I think taking a water taxi here would be fun.

At this point it was time for whale watching. During the winter months, humpback whales migrate to Mexico from Alaska to mate.

The crew distributed free alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks, including prepackaged snacks like potato chips.

Drinks included mai tais, tequila sunrises and even shots. Kids can have soda, Shirley Temples, and any drink that doesn’t need a blender.

I was far from optimistic about seeing whales, but after half an hour we spotted our first group.

It was quite a distance, but I saw two whales come up a few times. By the time our boat arrived, they were gone.

I would have been quite happy with that, but then we found the pod two more times, including one time where they came straight in front of us.

It was amazing to see these whales up close, and my kids loved it.

The team did a great job keeping drinks and snacks on hand and played some fun music throughout the course.

It was a great tour, and I really liked it. The fact that we saw whales a few times was amazing and made the tour fantastic.

Once the tour was over, we were dropped off at the pier. I took a brief walk around the harbor, but it looked a lot like Cozumel, so we headed back.

The smooth return was fairly quick and no lines to contend with.

Back on the boat, we take a quick shower before heading to dinner.

Dinner brought us back to Izumi. My phone was charging in the room so no pictures of the dinner, but the poke bowl and sushi sampler were great.

Tomorrow we are in Mazatlan.

Stray observations

I found another weird Royal Caribbean dish in the Windjammer today, Firecrackers!

I managed to get the kids into Adventure Ocean today without a reservation. We got there when they opened, and after a few kids with reservations walked in, we were admitted.


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Holidays in Barbados: what to see, do and eat in… https://saltwaterconnections.org/holidays-in-barbados-what-to-see-do-and-eat-in/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/holidays-in-barbados-what-to-see-do-and-eat-in/ Credit: World of Cruising Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados, offers the perfect cocktail of colonial heritage and Caribbean freshness, plus sensational rum, sun and seafood. This is what to do, see and eat there. Bridgetown is a port town on the southwest coast of beautiful Barbados, a pear-shaped island so small you can walk around […]]]>

Credit: World of Cruising

Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados, offers the perfect cocktail of colonial heritage and Caribbean freshness, plus sensational rum, sun and seafood. This is what to do, see and eat there.

Bridgetown is a port town on the southwest coast of beautiful Barbados, a pear-shaped island so small you can walk around it in a matter of hours. A British colony for over 300 years, it was once of great importance in the sugar trade.

Today, Barbados counts Mount Gay rum, cricketer Jofra Archer and singing superstar Rihanna among its most famous exports.

Barbados is sometimes referred to as Little England, and if you spend a few hours exploring its bustling capital, you’ll understand why.

The island is administratively divided into parishes and parts of the landscape could almost be Devon or Somerset. While the climate is sure to be warm enough for any sun-hungry Briton, even temperatures are milder here than in most Caribbean hotspots, with the golden beaches fanned by the easterly trade winds.

To see the sights, take advantage of the excellent duty-free shopping, then pour a Banks beer – or treat yourself to a potent rum cocktail – and sit down to enjoy that famous Bajana hospitality.

What to do in Bridgetown

The fairing

Today, luxury yachts and catamarans line Bridgetown Marina, also the site of the original wooden bridge from which the town takes its name.

Originally, it was the main port of the island, where ships were “streamlined” on one side for repair, cleaning and painting. Today it is a beautiful promenade which houses restaurants, bars and shops in what were once warehouses and shops selling produce.

It’s surprisingly quiet, especially on Sundays, and it’s a great place to take photos.

St. Marie’s Church

Built in 1825 to serve the island’s growing urban population, Bridgetown’s oldest church stands opposite the impressive Town Hall and peaceful Jubilee Garden, one of the few public green spaces in the city center.

Several notable Barbadians are buried here, including national hero Samuel Jackman Prescod, the first man of African descent to be elected to the island’s parliament.

Behind its pretty Georgian neoclassical facade, the cool blue and white painted interior offers a welcome respite from the heat and bustle of the capital.

The church tower clock was a gift from the famous local department store Cave Shepherd, for the princely sum of fifty thousand Barbados dollars.

– READ MORE: What to do in Barbados – travel guide –

National Heroes Square

Formerly Trafalgar Square, it is a one-stop-shop for monuments in Bridgetown. There is a statue of Lord Nelson, erected some 27 years before the London version, and a cenotaph war memorial dating from 1925.

You can also visit the National Heroes Gallery and the Parliament Museum, and nearby is the coral stone St. Michael’s Cathedral with its stunning stained glass windows.

Beaches galore

A ten-minute cab ride from central Bridgetown, Rockley Beach (also known as Accra) is a favorite spot for families with safe swimming and plenty of places to eat and drink. Otherwise, head to the crystal-clear waters of Carlisle Bay to enjoy one of the best scuba diving in the Caribbean.

Rockley Beach min

Barbados Holidays: Rockley Beach (also known as Accra) is a favorite spot for families with a safe swim. Credit: Shutterstock

What to see in Bridgetown

Statue of Errol Barrow

Prime Minister when Barbados obtained sovereignty from Great Britain in 1966, Errol Walton Barrow is known as the father of independence. Today it is commemorated on Errol Barrow Day – January 21 – and by this imposing 9 foot bronze sculpture in Independence Square.

– READ MORE: Caribbean cruise top experiences on to-do list –

Independence Arch

Located at the southern end of the Chamberlain Bridge, Independence Arch was built in 1987 and represents various emblems of Bajana heritage and culture, including the peacock flower – aka the pride of Barbados – and the national symbols of a pelican. and a flying fish.

Harrison Cave

Deep beneath the island’s central highlands, some 700 feet above sea level, lies an incredible underground world of tall caverns and milky white stalagmites.

Over a kilometer and a half long, this incredible cave system was rediscovered in the 1970s and today you can visit it by underground tram. When you step out, you can take in the air on a walking path with stunning views of the lush island landscape below.

Harrisons Cave min

Barbados Holidays: Harrisons’s Cave is an underground world of tall caverns and milky white stalagmites. Credit: Shutterstock

Where to eat in Bridgetown

Brown sugar

If you love seafood, you’ll be spoiled for choice in Bridgetown, with many restaurants offering excellent versions of local dishes such as flying fish and neck-neck (much like polenta) . To familiarize yourself with the flavors of Bajan, head to Brown Sugar for their famous All-You-Can-Eat Planter’s Buffet.

– READ MORE: Top 10 Reasons to Choose Holland America Line for a Caribbean Cruise –

Cuz fish hut

It might not sound like much, but this take-out shack is on many visitors’ must-see lists for a reason. Quite simply, Cuz’s branded “Fish and Cheese Cutter” might be the most delicious sandwich you’ve ever eaten.

Champers

On the other end of the scale, there’s food – and a setting – to celebrate at this gorgeous beachfront restaurant.

Light lunch bites include coconut shrimp, crab pancake, and chicken taco with pickled mango, but why not push the boat up and go to dinner of roasted barracuda or spiced pork tenderloin? It’s not cheap and you’ll have to hop in a cab to get there, but if you’re looking for something special, Champers won’t disappoint.

Where to eat at least

Where to eat in Bridgetown: Cuz’s Fish Shack (left) and Brown Sugar (right) are both worth a visit.

Where to shop in Bridgetown

Duty free

With visitor discounts of up to 40% on a wide range of merchandise (just show your passport and proof of departure at checkout), Barbados is a bargain hunter’s delight. Check out Bridgetown Duty Free (the former Cave Shepherd department store) on Broad Street, where you’ll also find several shopping malls.

Head to Woolworths (yes, they still have it here) for a bargain pick, or get lost among local shoppers at the colorful Swan Street Market, parallel to Broad Street.

– READ MORE: Find the cruise of your dreams with our handy vacation finder –

Mount Gay Distillery

The history of rum is the history of the Caribbean, and here they have been making golden nectar for over 300 years. Take a tour to find out how they do it, stay for a tasting, then stock up on samples and souvenirs at the visitor center shop.

You can even linger for a gourmet lunch – but remember that a typical rum punch recipe is “one sour, two sweet, three strong and four weak”, so it’s likely to do well. name. Maybe don’t plan on doing too much for the rest of the day.


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Preview: Stephen Miles designs in the spirit of the holidays with Outerlimits SL 44 paint https://saltwaterconnections.org/preview-stephen-miles-designs-in-the-spirit-of-the-holidays-with-outerlimits-sl-44-paint/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 21:04:53 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/preview-stephen-miles-designs-in-the-spirit-of-the-holidays-with-outerlimits-sl-44-paint/ More than a few high performance companies in the marine industry have closed their doors from Christmas week to New Year’s Day. Stephen Miles Design of Owensboro, Ky., However, is not one of them. In fact, the company’s namesake and his crew have plenty to keep them busy next week, starting with the painting of […]]]>

More than a few high performance companies in the marine industry have closed their doors from Christmas week to New Year’s Day. Stephen Miles Design of Owensboro, Ky., However, is not one of them. In fact, the company’s namesake and his crew have plenty to keep them busy next week, starting with the painting of a new SL 44 sportboat from Outerlimits Offshore Powerboats in Bristol, RI.

“The SL 44 returns to Outerlimits next week,” Miles said. “It was a really fun project. “

Once Stephen Miles Design finishes painting this 44ft Outerlimits, the company will tackle a 30ft Phantom followed by its first 37ft Outerlimits catamaran.

Once the 44ft exits the SMD facility, Miles will begin work on a smaller graphics project, a 30ft Phantom V-bottom. The boat is owned by his longtime friend Jose F. Rodriguez, Jr., who lives in Key West, Florida.

Miles won’t have much time to complete the Phantom. A new Outerlimits SC 37 catamaran, her first to paint, will be heading towards the arrival of the SL 44 in Bristol.

Enjoy more images of the SL 44 currently in the paint booth at Stephen Miles Design in the slideshow above.

“We’re painting this one for our good friends Jeremy, Kristie, and Tyler Tschida from Wisconsin,” he said. “Were really impatiently.

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