Keelboats – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 03:21:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saltwaterconnections.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Keelboats – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ 32 32 the gulf coast sailing scene bringing communities together https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-gulf-coast-sailing-scene-bringing-communities-together/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 11:19:12 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-gulf-coast-sailing-scene-bringing-communities-together/ With over 1,300 km of coastline, the Persian Gulf is a popular place for sailing. Steeped in the region’s history, sailing facilitated the development of early maritime trade routes when traditional wooden dhows sailed to East Africa, exporting local dates, pearls and mangrove wood. Today, sailing is as much a hobby as an industry. In […]]]>

With over 1,300 km of coastline, the Persian Gulf is a popular place for sailing. Steeped in the region’s history, sailing facilitated the development of early maritime trade routes when traditional wooden dhows sailed to East Africa, exporting local dates, pearls and mangrove wood. Today, sailing is as much a hobby as an industry.

In winter, the weather conditions are ideal, with minimum tides and predictable winds. This adrenaline-filled sailing sport is one of the most exciting ways to explore the region’s striking coastline.

With a population of around 80-90% expats, sailing also helps bring multicultural communities together in the UAE. The Dubai Offshore Sailing Club (DOSC), a non-profit organization run by volunteers, gives sailors of all backgrounds and skill levels the opportunity to board sailboats and compete in races.

One of the Keelboat Commodores Cup Division 1 crews, Team Lavazza has 20 members from 15 different countries.

“Different countries mean different origins. Due to different climates, philosophies and cultures, we all learn from each other here,” says Lavazza team captain and professional pilot Bernardo Landavoure. “And there’s a big common denominator here: we all love sailing.”

Founded in 1974, the DOSC today has more than 700 members. Its facilities include a marina with 152 berths and a clubhouse. In addition to a calendar of regattas and other races, it offers sailing courses.

“It’s very active,” says Werner Leppan, member of Team Lavazza. “We have everything from Tuesday night social sailing to dinghies. We have people from the age of five, learning in the little optimists [sail boats] to retirees. Sailing is something anyone from all walks of life can do.”

Werner Leppan points out that although most of those who sail in Dubai are amateurs, the sport is still very competitive.

“We take things very seriously, especially in the Premier League,” he said. “We don’t always come out on top, but we are normally one of the best. We push hard enough and we get there.”

From short course races in the Dubai Duty-Free Sailing League to the 10-day race from Dubai to Muscat Offshore, DOSC hosts a multitude of races throughout the year. The most hotly contested is the DOSC Commodores Cup, which takes place from September to May and consists of eight to ten rounds. It is during these intense competitions that the greatest bonds are woven between the crew members.

“We have people from all over the world. Being on a boat you have times when it’s a little less windy and you can talk,” says Fredric Penizzutti, another member of the Team Lavazza crew. “Other times in competition you don’t have time to talk. You have to work and you have to work together, sometimes in extreme conditions. That’s where you really get to know people.”

To find out more, please visit the Destination Dubai hub on Euronews.com

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Opportunity to develop the sport >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News https://saltwaterconnections.org/opportunity-to-develop-the-sport-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 19:28:26 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/opportunity-to-develop-the-sport-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ The World Sailing Training Fellowship ended after seven weeks in Weymouth, England, with applicants excited to return home and begin developing projects within their MNA (Member National Authority). During the course, candidates took part in a series of modules, including keelboats, first aid, running a training center and level 1, 2 and 3 technical courses […]]]>

The World Sailing Training Fellowship ended after seven weeks in Weymouth, England, with applicants excited to return home and begin developing projects within their MNA (Member National Authority).

During the course, candidates took part in a series of modules, including keelboats, first aid, running a training center and level 1, 2 and 3 technical courses for coaches, to give them a complete vision of the management of a national training programme. Program within a Federation.

This year’s participants included eight male coaches and one female coach representing Barbados, Dominican Republic, Egypt, El Salvador, Greece, Indonesia, Israel, Peru and Slovakia.

Each candidate was able to work on a project that they will implement in their MNA to further develop sailing upon their return.

Projects included:
– Develop coach mentoring programs and continuing professional development programs
– Organize structured courses of coaches and instructors
– Standardization of training programs within a federation
– Expand recreational boating opportunities
– Expand cooperation between sailing clubs

Koray Ezer, Head of International Development for World Sailing, said: “It was fantastic to see the exchange in action again with eight high quality participants from around the world and it would not have been possible without the support of the International Olympic Committee ( IOC ) and the financing of Olympic Solidarity. We hope that the participants now feel equipped to return to their country and continue to develop sailing with the skills they have learned.

Rob Holden, World Sailing Training Delivery Manager, said: “The 2022 scholarship has again shown the value of the program, with all eight applicants having made very good development plans for their countries.

“The mix of candidates was interesting and included countries with well-developed performance pathways and those with limited recreational and grassroots sailing pathways, as well as countries with small leisure-based programs. Each candidate identified the main area that he believes should be developed and has built his plans around it.

“I was very impressed with how the group grew throughout the course, with each identifying areas they needed to work on personally and for their country. If MPs work with them and allow them to grow MP, we will see an exciting legacy coming from the 2022 cohort.”

Rodrigo Colorado, President of the Sailing Federation of El Salvador, said: “The Global Sailing Training Scholarship gave me all the information I needed to develop and lead our National Sailing Federation. The process and methods shown throughout the course were well thought out, clear and helpful.

“The course teaches you how to sail from many different aspects, starting with safety, fun, learning to sail correctly and the path to performance. I already use many techniques and I am convinced that we will in the right direction to make sailors for life.

Greek candidate Viktor Brousis added: “I returned to my country with a renewed vision of teaching sailing and with many tools that I hope to use for sailing to develop as a sport in Greece. .

World Sailing will continue to support and work with applicants to help bring these projects to life and grow sailing in each MNA. For more information on the World Sailing Training Scholarship Program, Click here.

Source: World Sailing

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Boat Speedometer Market Future Growth, Trends, Key Leaders https://saltwaterconnections.org/boat-speedometer-market-future-growth-trends-key-leaders/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 10:14:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/boat-speedometer-market-future-growth-trends-key-leaders/ boat speedometer market According to Verified Market Research, Global Boat Speedometer Market was valued at USD 353.3 Million in 2020 and is projected to reach USD 558.5 Million by 2030, growing at a CAGR of 4.6% from 2021 to 2030. In 2020, Europe dominated the global boat speedometer market, accounting for 56.5% market share. of […]]]>

boat speedometer market

According to Verified Market Research, Global Boat Speedometer Market was valued at USD 353.3 Million in 2020 and is projected to reach USD 558.5 Million by 2030, growing at a CAGR of 4.6% from 2021 to 2030. In 2020, Europe dominated the global boat speedometer market, accounting for 56.5% market share. of the market.

Boat speedometer products are widely used in marine, boat, ship, sailboat and yacht. A boat speedometer is a device used to measure the speed of a boat relative to water. The boat speedometer is used on submarines and surface boats. The boat speedometer is available in two display modes, analog display and digital display.

Main companies
The major players profiled in the market report are Faria Beede Instruments, Inc, Veethree Group, Flir Systems Inc (Raymarine Plc), Nasa Marine Ltd, Gaffrig Performance Inc, Cruzpro Limited, Autometer Products, Compx International Inc (Livorsi Marine Inc), nKe Marine Electronics and SAN GIORGIO SEIN srl.

Get a free sample report @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/8637

Rising disposable income of the population coupled with soaring expenditure on tourism activities is driving the demand for boat speedometers in sailboats and keelboats, thereby driving the growth of the global boat speedometer market boats. For example, Spain’s disposable income recorded a growth of 5.9% from 2017 to 2020. Rising trend of boating across the globe is expected to drive the growth of the speedometer market for boats. The boat speedometer is capable of working with 12V or 24V on all types of boats, which helps in maintaining control and speed of boats and sailboats, thus fueling the growth of the boat speedometer market.

The increase in maritime trade increases the demand for systems for boats and yachts, which is expected to contribute to the growth of the global boat speedometer market. Pressure gauges, voltmeters, pitometer, tachometer and GPS speedometer are some of the boat speedometer products available in the market which have been widely adopted in boat and yacht systems to maintain the speed of boats and keelboats.

Major players such as Cruzpro Limited, Nasa Marine Ltd, and Flir Systems Inc provide speedometers for boats, sailboats, and recreational craft in the market. For example, West Marine Inc offers GPS Speedometer, Sierra Universal MPH GPS Boat Speedometer. It has a diameter of 3.375 inches and is waterproof. It is easy to install and assemble on boats and ships. It is able to operate in 12 V and 24 V on all types of boats.

Various manufacturers in the global boat speedometer market have had to halt their business operations due to the lockdown initiated in countries such as UAE, India, and Brazil. This had a direct impact on sales of boat speedometers, globally. For example, Compx International Inc’s net sales decreased by 7.8% from January 2019 to January 2020. In addition, lack of raw materials, supply chain disruption and lack of labor interrupted the supply chain of boat speedometer products. However, the availability of coronavirus disease vaccines is expected to lead to the global boat speedometer market opening at full capacity by the end of 2021 or the beginning of 2022.

However, fluctuating raw material prices and availability of substitutes, such as turbine log and propeller log, are expected to restrain the boat speedometer market growth. On the contrary, the increase in water sports activities globally is expected to create growth opportunities for the global market.

The global boat speedometer market is segmented into application, type, distribution channel, and region. Based on application, the market is divided into powerboats, sailboats/yachts and others. Motorboat segment dominated the market in 2020. Based on type, the market is fragmented into analog and digital. The digital segment generated the highest revenue in 2020. Based on the distribution channel, the market is segregated into offline and online. The offline segment dominated the market in 2020.

Regionally, the Global Boat Speedometer Market analysis is conducted in North America (US, Canada and Mexico), Europe (UK, France, Germany, Italy and Rest of Europe ), Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, Australia and Rest of Asia-Pacific) and LAMEA (Latin America, Middle East and Africa). In 2020, Europe was the largest contributor to the global boat speedometer market share and is expected to secure a leading position over the forecast period.

Access the full report @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/boat-speedometer-market-A08272

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This press release was published on openPR.

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Canada Ocean Racing wants to participate in the Vendée Globe https://saltwaterconnections.org/canada-ocean-racing-wants-to-participate-in-the-vendee-globe/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:33:46 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/canada-ocean-racing-wants-to-participate-in-the-vendee-globe/ Canada Ocean Racing is a newly founded offshore racing company by former Technology Engineering CEO Scott Shawyer. He aims to be the first Canadian to complete the Vendée Globe, a solo round-the-world race. To help him in this endeavor, the five-time Vendée Globe competitor Alex Thomson. Canada Ocean Racing -Photo by Mark Lloyd Part of […]]]>

Canada Ocean Racing is a newly founded offshore racing company by former Technology Engineering CEO Scott Shawyer. He aims to be the first Canadian to complete the Vendée Globe, a solo round-the-world race. To help him in this endeavor, the five-time Vendée Globe competitor Alex Thomson.

Canada Ocean Racing -Photo by Mark Lloyd

Part of this initiative includes a partnership with MLSE to teach children STEM programs that will teach them all about weather, navigation, life monitoring systems as well as boat operation. They will also work with The Magenta Project (an advocacy organization for women involved in performance sailing), sea cadets and local yacht clubs to build community around this campaign.

We had the chance to speak with Scott to find out more.

What does it take to compete in the Vendée Globe and why is it so difficult? What types of preparation does this require?

I would say the Vendée Globe is the toughest sporting competition on the planet because you are
completely alone, in a non-stop race around the world for 3-4 months, battling the elements. There’s no
another competition that tests your physical and mental endurance like the Vendée Globe.

The rules are simple, you take everything you need, you can’t put your feet down and you can’t take anything
assistance, and once you have left France, you must return by your own means. The preparation however, well
This is an other story ! I take the next 6 years to prepare myself and learn everything I need – by experience
to security and technical protocols, 2028 is just the right time. It’s not just about the end
goal, it’s about the journey for me. I start as a real novice and I hope to come out of it like the
first Canadian to finish the race! The training began with my first transatlantic crossing this past
summer – it was exciting to say the least, when you are faced with 4 meter waves. Beyond spending
time spent on the water working on my sailing skills, I am also working on a number of mental tools to manage
anxiety, isolation and even seasickness.

What has been your toughest race to date?

At this point, I’m an amateur sailor. I have been sailing dinghies and small keel boats since I was a child, but this
is a new area for me. I’m starting my first double-handed IMOCA race at the start of next year. Of the,

I will be taking part in some of the races in the IMOCA Globe double-handed and single-handed series leading up to the Vendée
Globe 2024 so I’m getting used to the fleet and the competition before it starts to count.

Canada Ocean Racing - Photo by Mark Lloyd
Scott Shawyer of Canada Ocean Racing – Photo by Mark Lloyd

Tell us about some of the ways you engage young people and introduce them to sailing.

When I was eight I developed my passion for sailing – I was sailing dinghies at my family’s house
Cottage. Before I knew it, I was sailing catamarans and even competing on Antrim 27 sports boats.

Due to my exposure to sailing as a child, I can confidently say that I have found the passion of my life. I
want to provide the same experiences to other children and inspire the next generation to take charge of their
own adventure. We offer young people the opportunity to board the IMOCA 60 yacht and
understand the opportunities available to them. For example, we will invite students to attend boat trips
and STEM sessions as an extracurricular activity. I’ve always been passionate about investing in children, which is one of the reasons I co-wrote the “Go Outside Activity Challenge Book” which encourages
children to engage in outdoor exploration.

Where will Team Canada Ocean Racing be based and train?

We will train mainly outside of Europe. Most of the races in the series leading up to the Vendée Globe begin in
France, so it makes geographical sense for us to be there. It is also not currently practical for us to train
of Canada, but we would like to do so once the infrastructure is in place to maintain a racing boat like ours.

Our long-term goal is for the team to be based outside of Canada and for us, even if the boat is not
physically here – will work with the organization to develop the skills needed to work in an ocean
racing team.

How can young people get involved in the various programs offered?

We have engaged in a number of youth programs while in Canada this year and we will
keep doing it. These range from very enthusiastic sea cadets to college sailing teams and young
sailors from local sailing clubs. Each group received an in-depth technical tour of the boat. when we
put together the team, we realized that we had to work hard to develop and inspire the next generation, to
show them that there are real careers in a team like ours, it’s not just about being a sailor, you also have to
engineers, riggers, painters, social media, designers, finance and many other roles. Sailing brings life
lots of science, math and environmental topics, and it’s also great for your geography! For
For example, how do you get a 60ft race boat from the Atlantic to Toronto? What are the forces at work
on a sailboat? How does the carbon cycle work in the ocean? These are just a few of the topics offered.

While we were here in Toronto, we also hosted a session for Project Magenta whose champions get
more women in our sport, a group of 8 sailors spent two days with us and they participated in
workshops on rigging, weather, sponsorship and spent a day training with us in over 25 knots of wind!

How did you team up with Alex Thomson? How did the relationship start?

I’m looking to build a successful business that thrives long after racing so who better to get on board
than a legend like Alex Thomson, who ran a very professional organization in this field for over 20
years. I want to speed up and Alex has completed 5x Vendée globes, which is more than half of the
Vendée Globes that have existed! Alex’s team is what many would consider the most successful in a long time
leading the IMOCA team around the world. There are so many things about putting together a campaign like this that I thought
it would be nice to get a head start and learn from the best, so I hired Alex and his team to
help us build a team for Canada. Our objective is not only to succeed in the Vendée Globe 2028 but to
build and operate a professionally run IMOCA program here in Canada for many years to come.

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Major contribution to Kinsale design for new 54m sloop with supranational connections https://saltwaterconnections.org/major-contribution-to-kinsale-design-for-new-54m-sloop-with-supranational-connections/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 15:26:36 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/major-contribution-to-kinsale-design-for-new-54m-sloop-with-supranational-connections/ Today’s largest sailing superyachts are so much a world unto themselves that they lead a sort of independent, supranational existence. The name of Argentinian-born designer Juan Kouyoumdjian (one ancestor was Armenian) is perhaps best known in Ireland for his direct creative connection to George David’s Rambler 88. But in terms of big boat development, the […]]]>

Today’s largest sailing superyachts are so much a world unto themselves that they lead a sort of independent, supranational existence. The name of Argentinian-born designer Juan Kouyoumdjian (one ancestor was Armenian) is perhaps best known in Ireland for his direct creative connection to George David’s Rambler 88. But in terms of big boat development, the Rambler 88 is now historic and small with him, while the late Juan K worked in conjunction with Kinsale-based Rob Doyle on decidedly large-scale projects.

In fact, they’re on such a scale at 54 meters LOA that it’s hard to grasp their size, especially when you consider they’ll be walking on a single, cloud-piercing mast that will be well north of 130 meters from height. This will inevitably limit their sailing areas, as there are many large bridges spanning the ship channel that they cannot pass under. But at the moment there seems to be something of an arms race in the upper tier of sailing superyachts to have the boat that can list the most non-negotiable decks. So as far as the Argo 54 is concerned, it’s fine.

His design decisions affect budgets in the millions – Rob Doyle at work in his Kinsale office

The beautifully crafted aluminum hull was launched in the heart of the Dutch suburbs last week and, with consummate skill, navigated a canal seemingly no wider than Dublin’s River Dodder, until more open water is reached and the voyage to the completion yard in Greece could begin.

The new Argo 54 hull afloat for the first time.  The locations of some of the main Dutch boat building facilities can be surprisingly suburban - can you imagine coming across something like this in the middle of Sandymount?The new Argo 54 hull afloat for the first time. The locations of some of the main Dutch boat building facilities can be surprisingly suburban – can you imagine coming across something like this in the middle of Sandymount?

As we said, it’s not so much international as supranational, and at next week’s METS in Amsterdam, players from this extremely rarefied world will come together to negotiate superyacht deals for sums significantly in excess of GNP of some of the Polynesian small island nations. And amidst it all, there will be Kinsale brains and talent hard at work, moving exit dreams along the first steps into reality.

  “Meanwhile, just off Sandymount Green…..” No matter how you look at it, the Argo 54 is a serious biggie

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A pioneering and inspiring Chinese sailor taking on the Route du Rhum https://saltwaterconnections.org/a-pioneering-and-inspiring-chinese-sailor-taking-on-the-route-du-rhum/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 02:31:43 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/a-pioneering-and-inspiring-chinese-sailor-taking-on-the-route-du-rhum/ A pioneering and inspiring Chinese sailor taking on the Route du Rhum by Ed Gorman / IMOCA Globe Series Nov 2 23:53 PDT November 6, 2022 Chinese navigator Jingkun Xu – Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe © Jean-Louis Carli / IMOCA You get used to hearing stories of perseverance through thick and thin, determination to […]]]>

A pioneering and inspiring Chinese sailor taking on the Route du Rhum

by Ed Gorman / IMOCA Globe Series Nov 2 23:53 PDT
November 6, 2022

Chinese navigator Jingkun Xu – Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe © Jean-Louis Carli / IMOCA


You get used to hearing stories of perseverance through thick and thin, determination to succeed and not accepting a negative response in the IMOCA class. But one of the brand new skippers to join the ranks of this Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe is truly breathtaking.

The 33-year-old Chinese sailor Jingkun Xu arrived at the start village of Saint-Malo for this quadrennial classic after the most improbable of journeys, a journey through life remarkable for what has already been accomplished and even less what awaits us.

Jingkun was born into a poor Chinese farming family living in the hills above what is now the “sailing city” of Qingdao. If all went well, the best he could have hoped for was to follow his parents into the hard work of farming. But all did not go well. At the age of 12, Jingkun suffered a devastating injury to his left arm in a fireworks accident that required his amputation just below the elbow. For all intents and purposes, he was told, his life was ruined.

But the youngster was determined his injury would not define him and clung to the idea of ​​joining the newly formed Chinese Paralympic team. Instead of destroying his life, his injury would become his opportunity. He was given the choice – sailing, cycling or running – and even though he had never seen the sea or a boat, he chose sailing.

In 2008, he and two teammates finished 10th out of 14 in the Sonar category at the Qingdao Paralympic Regatta, by which time Jingkun had already read of the exploits of Britain’s Ellen MacArthur. Inspired by his example, he dreamed of going around the world alone in the Vendée Globe.

In 2012, he cruised the entire Chinese coast in a 24ft keelboat he had refurbished after saving it from a landfill. He followed that up in 2015 by becoming the first Chinese sailor to complete the Mini-Transat, finishing 36th out of 43 in the Series Division.

Then, accompanied by his Chinese wife Sofia, he completed a three-year world tour in a Lagoon catamaran in June 2020 – 34,000 miles covered and visited 40 countries without an autopilot – before acquiring the IMOCA Finot-Conq vintage 2007 by Alan Roura. Along the way, he qualified as a sailing instructor, established his own sailing school in China, and became an ambassador for Qingdao.

Today, this Chinese sailor, who is staring at you with a strong and confident gaze, is on the eve of his very first IMOCA race after a few frantic months preparing the boat while living on board. With little sponsorship funding so far, he had to learn everything from scratch and had very little time to sail a boat he named “Dream of China Haikou” after the Chinese city where he and his wife lived.

The Route du Rhum is in his sights, but the dream remains the Vendée Globe and Jingkun will do everything possible to be one of the 40 skippers at the start. “For me, this is my first time in IMOCA and the first time I’ve joined the Route du Rhum,” he said in English from the cockpit of his boat. “But ultimately my goal is to take part in the Vendée Globe. For my project I have to finish the Route du Rhum, I have to finish, take care of the boat, not damage anything and finish the race.”

“I do all the work alone, he explains, so I only had two or three training sessions. At the beginning it’s very hard, it’s not an easy boat, but it is a good thing because I did all the work myself so I learn fast I learned electricity and technology so now I can control the boat but I also need more learning and training.

Remarkably, Jingkun is not the only sailor in the IMOCA fleet to have a hand, as he is following in the footsteps of Frenchman Damien Seguin, and the two have known each other for years, dating back to their Paralympic days. Jingkun says he would like to develop some adaptations on his boat to help compensate for the loss of his forearm, like Seguin did with his cockpit winch base, for example. But he thinks it’s harder to pull off than for Seguin – who was born without a hand – because Jingkun has almost no forearm below his elbow on the left side.

“Nothing has been done,” he said in his loud, melodious speech. “I haven’t had time. Instead of adapting the boat, I prefer – and it’s much easier – to adapt. I change my way of doing things to adapt to this boat.”

Jingkun admits he is both nervous and excited to join the ranks of the IMOCA class and compete in one of its most iconic races, but he says he was warmly welcomed by his fellow skippers. “I know a lot of sailors because we did the Mini Transat together in 2015. So when I came here I didn’t feel like a stranger. I was here in 2015 and I have a lot of friends here and I knew the workers and some sailors too,” he said.

One of the many impressive aspects of this story is the phenomenal social media following that Jingkun already enjoys in China. His is bigger – and several times bigger – than all the other IMOCA skippers put together. On a Chinese social media platform, he has over 130 million followers while more than 300 million Chinese are expected to follow the live stream of his race start on Sunday.

Already a two-time Chinese Sailor of the Year, Jingkun hopes his exploits will inspire other young Chinese sailors to pursue their dreams. “I’m excited and I care about everyone who follows me,” he said. “I’m surprised and lucky to have so many people following me and supporting me, it’s because we are the first Chinese team to have a place in the Route du Rhum and also in IMOCA. We have worked so hard this year and have tried to record what we do (there was a television crew on board during our interview), and the Route du Rhum is what we have been working on and we hope it will introduce our team and also ocean racing.”

And so the adventure begins as Jingkun embarks on his second solo Atlantic crossing – this time to Guadeloupe – before returning his boat to France as he begins his epic journey to the Vendée Globe.

During our interview, Sofia had acted as a translator when her husband couldn’t think of words he wanted to use in English. As I left the boat, I asked her if she was nervous about him leaving on a powerful IMOCA with foils which he had very little time to discover.

“No, I’m not nervous,” she said. “I’m confident in his abilities. He’s not a mad adventurer – he only does things he knows he can handle.”

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Work harder than everyone else >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News https://saltwaterconnections.org/work-harder-than-everyone-else-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 17:49:22 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/work-harder-than-everyone-else-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ by Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt Sailing NewsEd Adams will be officially inducted into National Sailing Hall of Fame on November 5 in Newport, RI. It is a deserved honor and recognition for his many accomplishments as a competitor and coach. I haven’t always liked Ed, but not for any defensible reason. It was the early 1980s, […]]]>

by Craig Leweck, Scuttlebutt Sailing News
Ed Adams will be officially inducted into National Sailing Hall of Fame on November 5 in Newport, RI. It is a deserved honor and recognition for his many accomplishments as a competitor and coach.

I haven’t always liked Ed, but not for any defensible reason. It was the early 1980s, our rivalry was in the Snipe class, and he was on the east coast while I was on the west coast. We were more casual in our approach when he was an activist. He wasn’t the life of the party, he just wanted to win and his work ethic was boring.

However, I saw a different side of him during the 1985 SORC. We were on different boats and on a day off I found myself joining him on a discovery tour. The latest and greatest IOR racing boats were available, and he was curious. I watched him jump shamelessly from boat to boat, lifting and looking at every detail. He saw what I did not see and I was fascinated by education.

Kids, if you think you’re going to excel at this sport competing against people your own age, you’re wrong. We lied to you. You need to explore different boats and find people older than you, better than you, and different from you to improve. I was lucky to grow up in a time when that was normal, and Ed improved my education.

Several years later, at the 2011 Etchells Worlds, he coached our team to victory. His presence stabilized us, he assured and secured our direction, and his confidence gave us confidence. When he noticed personality changes, he spoke to us. His consistency helped us win with a race to spare.

So I came full circle with Ed and enjoyed his response to a Sailing World interview question when asked, Was it better when people taught themselves, like you did, rather than relying on coaches, as is so often the case today? His answer…

I think some of the skills that we developed before we had coaches were maybe a bit better, but obviously that extends the learning period. I have strong opinions about junior training. I think our whole junior process, where kids are run by parents – parents try to get their kids into exclusive colleges and hire coaches who tell kids what to do instead of how to do it, or how figure things out on their own — all too often leaves us with children who lack motivation.

And on a professional level, motivated people are those who succeed, not necessarily those who were motivated by parents. So to answer your question another way, accepted junior training practices, when directed by parents, are not good for our Olympic and professional sailing development. Coaches need to guide kids carefully, teach them how to problem solve – it’s a tricky process, but this push to get kids through college rather than making them better problem solvers isn’t helpful .

Also, kids who don’t have a lot of money don’t have as many opportunities as a lot of kids who are ruled by their parents. There are plenty of stories of kids who don’t come from wealthy backgrounds, who are driven and achieve great things. And I think there’s more that we don’t know about because the outcomes and the opportunities that come with it are so dominated by the kids led by the parents.

Victor Diaz de Leon from Venezuela comes to mind. He went to Sainte-Marie. He was second on the team, had to learn to speak English, and when he graduated he spent his time teaming up for good people. Over the past year, he’s become the best pro-level tactician in the keelboat fleet, simply by working harder than everyone else.

For a complete interview, Click here.

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Intercollegiate Sailing Finishes MAISA Championships and Prepares for Solo ICSA https://saltwaterconnections.org/intercollegiate-sailing-finishes-maisa-championships-and-prepares-for-solo-icsa/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:24:58 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/intercollegiate-sailing-finishes-maisa-championships-and-prepares-for-solo-icsa/ History links ANNAPOLIS, Md. – The Navy Intercollegiate Sailing Team wrapped up the regular fall season this weekend with two conference championships and a local keelboat event. The MAISA Fall Women’s Championship was home to Annapolis and featured 11 teams. On Saturday, swollen and unstable northeasterly winds, and an unfavorable […]]]>

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – The Navy Intercollegiate Sailing Team wrapped up the regular fall season this weekend with two conference championships and a local keelboat event.

The MAISA Fall Women’s Championship was home to Annapolis and featured 11 teams. On Saturday, swollen and unstable northeasterly winds, and an unfavorable sailing forecast for Sunday led organizers to opt to try and complete the event in one day. Shifting winds caused a handful of races to be abandoned, but sailors were still able to complete races in every division on Saturday. The contenders found themselves on the wrong end of a couple of shifts and placed eighth overall, as a sophomore Evie Blauvelt and junior Julia Christie finished fourth in “A” Division while a senior Elizabeth Linsdelljunior Aubin Hattendorfsecond year students Izzy Fadullon, Linnea Forsberg and Maggie Schuler and freshmen Ava Farley and Ella Niehoff combined to place ninth in the “B” division.

The Mids were also represented at the War Memorial Regatta, which served as the MAISA Fall Open Championship for an 18-team regatta at SUNY Maritime in Bronx, NY. The regatta featured light winds and strong current, with just eight “A” Divisions and six “B” Division races completed on Saturday. Sunday saw even less wind, which resulted in no racing. Navy tied for third, but lost the tiebreaker to Georgetown to place fourth. Senior Gavin McJones and freshman Ellie-Alex finished fifth in the “A” division, while freshman Nathan Smith and second Ryan Wahba also earned fifth place in the “B” division.

A group of Navy sailors also competed in the J-22 East Coast Championship in Annapolis, hosted by the Severn Sailing Association. Although new to the boat, the midshipmen fought hard and finished second in the final race. This last race served as a high point for the sophomore team Tanner KellySenior Caden Scheiblauer and freshmen Alex Brenia and Jack Welburnas the crew placed 17th overall in the 20-boat fleet

The Navy returns to the water this Saturday and Sunday November 5-6 at the ICSA Singlehanded Championships in Norfolk, Virginia.

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Historic club sets course for an inclusive future https://saltwaterconnections.org/historic-club-sets-course-for-an-inclusive-future/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 17:23:55 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/historic-club-sets-course-for-an-inclusive-future/ The QUEENSCLIFF Cruising Yacht Club (QCYC) will celebrate its 60th anniversary this weekend with a commemorative race and opening day to mark the event. The Swan Island-based club will open its doors on Sunday October 30 to celebrate the occasion and will host a Port Phillip Bay race to complement its festivities. A passing race […]]]>

The QUEENSCLIFF Cruising Yacht Club (QCYC) will celebrate its 60th anniversary this weekend with a commemorative race and opening day to mark the event.

The Swan Island-based club will open its doors on Sunday October 30 to celebrate the occasion and will host a Port Phillip Bay race to complement its festivities.

A passing race for the Goorangai Memorial Trophy tomorrow (Saturday October 29) will kick off at the Royal Brighton Yacht Club in Queenscliff, bringing dozens of sails across the bay ahead of the anniversary celebrations the following day.

Sunday will include opening day, a fleet blessing and lunch, with RSVP essential by contacting the club.

Photo: MARCEL BERENS/SPORTS MEDIA IMAGES

The Goorangai Trophy is in honor of HMAS Goorangai, which sank in 1940 en route from Queenscliff to Portsea after colliding with the passenger ship MV Duntroon. All 24 crew members of the Goorangai died in the tragedy.

Former QCYC member Les Nangle, who had served on Goorangai as a Royal Australian Navy Volunteer Reserve NCO before his last voyage, presented the club with the trophy in remembrance of the lost crew.

The memorial race this year will include the Eliza Ramsden Trophy for the winner of the newly introduced women’s barre division.

The club said the new trophy builds on the success of its women’s Keelboat Introduction for Sailing Savvy program and a broader drive to be more inclusive and encourage women’s participation in its activities – headlined by its commodore current Lee Renfree, who became the club’s first female manager last year.

“Queenscliff Cruising Yacht Club has much to celebrate in its 60th year, a club like no other that offers so much to members and visitors alike,” the club said.

“The invitation to join the party on the paradise island is open to all to come and enjoy.”

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Sian Reynolds makes history as first female chair and youngest chair appointed to RYA Cymru Wales board https://saltwaterconnections.org/sian-reynolds-makes-history-as-first-female-chair-and-youngest-chair-appointed-to-rya-cymru-wales-board/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 10:13:59 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/sian-reynolds-makes-history-as-first-female-chair-and-youngest-chair-appointed-to-rya-cymru-wales-board/ The Royal Yachting Association Cymru Wales has announced the appointment of Sian Reynolds as Chairman of its Board of Directors. Sian’s appointment goes down in history as she is the first female president and also the youngest president of RYA Cymru Wales‘ plank. She brings a wealth of experience to the role as she has […]]]>

The Royal Yachting Association Cymru Wales has announced the appointment of Sian Reynolds as Chairman of its Board of Directors.

Sian’s appointment goes down in history as she is the first female president and also the youngest president of RYA Cymru Wales‘ plank. She brings a wealth of experience to the role as she has been involved with RYA Cymru Wales for almost 30 years, having been a member and captain of the Welsh Sailing Team and most recently a member of the Board of Directors.

Sian was selected to sail for the Welsh Sailing Team (dinghies and keelboats) for five years as well as the British Sailing Team (keelboats).

She has many national and international racing achievements, including finishing in the top eight of three World Championships in three different boat classes and finishing 2nd in the Women’s Match Racing Championships of Great Britain.

Sian still races regularly and was the first woman at the Welsh Championships last year.

In addition to her competitive accomplishments, Sian is also an RYA Race Coach (dinghies and keelboats) and RYA Regional Judge, roles she greatly enjoys.

Sian is experienced, dedicated and committed to the politics and governance of RYA Cymru Wales, having become a board member and chair of the RYA Cymru Wales (South) Regional Committee six years ago, the regional body said for boating in Wales.

Chris Munro, Managing Director of RYA Cymru Wales, said: “I am delighted to welcome Sian as the new Chairman of RYA Cymru Wales. Sian’s knowledge and experience will be invaluable in leading the organization as we work to implement our new strategy.

“Sian’s appointment has been unanimously supported by the RYA Cymru Wales Board and I am sure will be welcomed by our key partners and the yachting community in Wales.”

Sian is also passionate about performance sailing and has been on the RYA Cymru Wales Performance Committee for three years and was appointed to the RYA Race Committee last year, roles she will continue.

RYA Chairman Chris Preston congratulated Sian on his appointment and added: “The entire RYA team looks forward to working with Sian and the staff at RYA Cymru Wales to support safe and enjoyable boating in the Land of Wales.

Outside of the yachting world, Sian is a practicing lawyer with 17 years of experience. Sian was second Welsh Young Lawyer of the Year and has been recognized by the Legal 500 on numerous occasions for the quality of her work.

Sian studied law at the University of Wales, Swansea where she was a sports scholar and was recently recognized by the university as one of its 100 Inspirational Graduates due to her achievements on and off. some water.

Commenting on his nomination. Sian said, “I am proud of RYA CW, its staff and its volunteers. Boating has and will continue to play a major role in my life and I am passionate about ensuring that there are opportunities for all of our communities across Wales to get afloat and enjoy the benefits of boating, for generations to come.

“I look forward to working with the RYA, the RYA CW and my colleagues on the Board to improve the services we provide, build on the success of the Welsh Sailing Team and meet the future challenges of yachting. across Wales in my role as Chairman of RYA CW Council.

Sian Reynolds replaces Mike Butterfield, who resigned from the post in August, as previously stated on Afloat.ie.

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