Multihulls – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 20:02:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saltwaterconnections.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Multihulls – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ 32 32 Bermuda race winners claim the best https://saltwaterconnections.org/bermuda-race-winners-claim-the-best/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 20:02:12 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/bermuda-race-winners-claim-the-best/ Class 16 of the 52nd Newport Bermuda Race pull away from Newport just before the storm front that would calm the remaining divisions that would follow. Daniel Forster Illusiona Cal 40 owned by Sally and Stan Honey (Palo Alto, Calif.) won the 52nd edition of the Newport Bermuda Race’s largest division, the St. David’s Lighthouse […]]]>

Class 16 of the 52nd Newport Bermuda Race pull away from Newport just before the storm front that would calm the remaining divisions that would follow.
Daniel Forster

Illusiona Cal 40 owned by Sally and Stan Honey (Palo Alto, Calif.) won the 52nd edition of the Newport Bermuda Race’s largest division, the St. David’s Lighthouse Division (108 boats), marking the fourth time a Cal 40 won the St David’s Lighthouse Division, after Vincent Learson’s Thunderbird in 1966 and Peter Rebovich, Sr.’s Sinn Fein in 2006 and 2008.

Running with 1984 Olympic gold medalist Carl Buchan (Seattle, Washington), fellow Cal 40 owner Don Jesberg (Belvedere, CA) and multi-tasker Jonathan “Bird” Livingston (Richmond, CA) as archer, Illusion completed the 635 nautical mile course with an elapsed time of 87h:01m:33s, good for a corrected time of 51:02:13 and a decisive victory over two hours over Andrew Clark’s (Greenwich, Connecticut) J/122 Zigzag. Jim Murray’s Pac52 (Lake Bluff, Ill.) Callistothe winner of division line honours, finished third, just 15 seconds behind Zigzag corrected time.

Sally and Stan Honey’s Cal 40 Illusion, class 10 and St. David’s flagship division winner, arrives in Hamilton Harbour.
Chris Burville

Sailing their ‘last hurray’ to Illusion (they sold the boat to Stan’s nephew), Sally Honey said it was the perfect end to an illustrious 33-year run with the boat.

“The conditions were perfect for our boat, and we had a very good navigator on board,” Sally said, referring to her husband, Stan. “Stan picked a really good course, and the conditions were exactly what the boat likes, big reach. Lots of it. We got into a Gulf Stream eddy and were there for about seven hours. That gave us a good shot. of an inch. We managed to stay upwind most of the time. We had a few bright spots, but nothing like the later boats.

Sally Honey said she reached a top speed of 22 knots with Buchan at the helm on Saturday evening. She woke the sleeping crew with hoots and howls of excitement, but otherwise spent most of the race with the crosswind.

“We didn’t have much water on deck,” Sally Honey said. “At reach, the boat heels just above and the windier it is, the faster it goes. Really, it was a dream trip, fabulous. I wouldn’t change anything.

In the Finisterre division of 38 cruisers, the Tripp 65 of Dudley Johnson (New York City) Prevail won first place, beating Andrew Burton’s Baltic 47 (Newport, Rhode Island) Masquerade a little over 25 minutes. The division was divided into three classes, with Prevail win class 9, Masquerade Class 8 and Brian Bush (North Chatham, Massachusetts) Stilla Tartan 37-2, Class 7.

“Our plan from the start was to go east of the rhumbline and sail as fast as possible to follow the front,” said navigator Adam Klyver (Fairfield, Connecticut). “But the front was elusive and we kept running into the hollow.

“In the Gulf Stream, we had warrior won passed us on Saturday morning, so we felt like we were doing something right,” said Klyver, 55, who was competing in his second race in Bermuda and his first as a sailor. “We tried to stay in the middle of the Stream and found a current of five knots pushing us south-east. We probably had favorable current for almost 90% of the race.

Winner of General Line Honors Jason Carroll’s MOD70 (New York City) Argoended late Saturday night, marking the first-ever Saturday finish in the race’s 116-year history. Argo sets a new course record of 33 hours, at an average speed of 19.24 knots.

“It’s the most important race near home for us,” said Carroll, 44, who co-founded Hudson River Trading in 2002. “It’s amazing because it’s only recently that multihulls have been allowed to race. It’s exciting. It’s the race people in New York and Newport know best; to be the record holder is cool.

In the high performance Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division, warrior wonthe Pac52 of Christopher Sheehan (Larchmont, New York), took first place not only in corrected time but also in elapsed time, taking monohull line honors and the Corporation of Hamilton award as the winner in time elapsed from the combined St. David’s Lighthouse and Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Divisions.

warrior wonElapsed time of 56h:43m:34s corrected to 48m:47s victory over NEKA Sailing’s custom J/120 Desperadocommanded by Leonid Vasiliev (Port Jefferson, New York), and 58m:31s ahead of Darren Walters’ Sunfast 3300 (Boston, Massachusetts) Alchemist. Originally listed as the class winner and 2nd overall in the division, Alchemist was penalized 30 minutes on the time elapsed for an OCS start according to the notice of race, 2.2 l.

In 2016, Sheehan won the St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy with his Xp44 of the same name. Now, after this Saturday’s awards ceremony, he will become the first owner to win a Lighthouse Trophy as winner of Gibbs Hill and St. David’s.

“It’s very humbling,” said Sheehan, who won the Transpac race last year and the Caribbean 600 last February. “I had thought about it before the race. I had a ton of confidence in my team and my boat that we would have a chance at Gibbs Hill lighthouse.There are so many wonderful records and legendary sailors in this race.

In the Spirit of Tradition division, the sailing training ship of the Bermuda Sloop Foundation The spirit of Bermuda, commanded by Alexander Peacock (Newmarket, New Hampshire), completed the course in 92h:25m:09s. It was the fourth time the three-masted schooner, designed by Bill Langan, has taken part in the race.

In the Open Division, Charlie Enright’s (Barrington, Rhode Island) malama from the 11th Hour Racing Foundation, finished in 41h:28m:43s, good for the fourth fastest elapsed time in race history. In the 141-foot steel-hulled Martin Sutter (Austin, Texas) division, Superyacht Colombia finished in 87h:07m:34s.

In the Doubles division, Zachary Doerr (Butler, Pennsylvania), 20, an undergraduate at the Webb Institute, and Vladimir Shablinsky, 53 (Glen Cove, New York), sailing the Figaro Custom 2 Group 5won Class 6 and took a nearly five-hour win over the Sigma 41 Reveille of James Hammitt (Wayland, Mass.), which won Class 5.

“It was great fun for my first real offshore race,” said Doerr, who teamed up with Shablinsky, his North East Keelboat Alliance (NEKA) sailing coach. “It has a lot to do with our comfort with the boat, especially the second night when it was blowing 30 and we were going 20 knots with the A2 spinnaker up. I feel like most boats in the class in double didn’t push as hard, and we kept pushing and did a lot of miles that night, it was unlike anything I had ever experienced before.

Final results

Additional video interviews with competitors and class winners

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The first electric-powered X-Yacht is powered by Oceanvolt https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-first-electric-powered-x-yacht-is-powered-by-oceanvolt/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 14:11:42 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-first-electric-powered-x-yacht-is-powered-by-oceanvolt/ One of Denmark’s best-known sailing yacht manufacturers has launched its first electric-powered X-Yacht, a 49-foot, 12-tonne X4⁹E fitted with two 10kW electric saildrives from Oceanvolt. “I’m really happy to say that the time has come to present the first electric-powered X-Yacht,” said Kræn Nielsen, CEO of X-Yachts. “A new range of electric-powered sailboats is a […]]]>

One of Denmark’s best-known sailing yacht manufacturers has launched its first electric-powered X-Yacht, a 49-foot, 12-tonne X4⁹E fitted with two 10kW electric saildrives from Oceanvolt.

“I’m really happy to say that the time has come to present the first electric-powered X-Yacht,” said Kræn Nielsen, CEO of X-Yachts. “A new range of electric-powered sailboats is a natural step for us to support a greener future, a great fit with other initiatives, such as being title sponsor of the Race For Oceans Foundation.”

X-Yacht electric propulsion: cruise and speed

This first electric powered X-Yacht was built for John Haurum, who enjoys using her for ocean cruising, but also appreciates the high performance aspects of the X-Yachts brand, and sails the new X4⁹E, now named ‘Flow‘, in the Garmin Round Denmark race. He also hopes to compete in the ARC Transatlantic Cruiser Rally.

“When I met X-Yachts and shared my ideas,” says John, “They immediately committed to the project and shared a common interest in merging innovation, sailing fun and a greener future.”

Andras Ørbæk Olesen, commercial director of the electric-powered X-Yacht, was also enthusiastic. “When I first met John and he told me about his idea of ​​having a new electric powered boat, I immediately sensed his interest and passion for this eco-friendly system. For John, it was more than just a product and a new boat – it was a passion for a new future with sustainable energy combined with his passion for sailing.

Twin motors with ServoProp regeneration

The X4⁹E is a specially adapted version of the existing X4⁹ and considerable development has gone into the new model. There has been close cooperation not only between the customer and the shipyard, but also between X-Yachts and Oceanvolt, engaged due to their long experience in electric motors for sailboats and their leadership in regenerative technology. Their website has a page showing that their technology is now standard equipment on dozens of monohulls, multihulls and powerboats.

Electric propulsion X-Yacht features this ServoProp propeller systemX-Yachts Technical Director John Morsing and his team consulted with Oceanvolt’s experts and they opted for two ServoProp SD10 motor modules, each rated at 10kW and backed by a 28″ LiFePO4 (lithium iron phosphate) battery. .8 kWh. Pairing the 10kW doubles the power – together they can deliver roughly the same power as a 30-40hp diesel engine – and also offers increased safety through redundancy.

The motors run on 48V and are mounted either side of the traditional engine compartment, under the aft cabin berths. The design team reconfigured the old diesel compartment, which “still has the beautiful aluminum finish on all sides, but with the sound insulation excluded – it is no longer necessary”.

The motors’ ServoProp designation (SD is SailDrive) indicates that they feature Oceanvolt’s award-winning ServoProp variable-pitch propellers, which work to maximize the capabilities of the Oceanvolt regenerative system.

For sailboats, regeneration (sometimes called hydro-regeneration) is one of the major advantages of electric propulsion over diesel. When driven by the electric motor, battery power is consumed like a combustion engine consumes diesel. But when sailing under wind power, the rotation of the propellers due to the movement of the water is used to generate electricity and recharge the battery.

8 hours of navigation charges the batteries

The X4⁹E can produce up to 3.5kW when cruising at speeds above 8 knots. This means that sailing for about eight hours will charge the batteries from empty to full. John Morsing adds that “By the way, this ‘full tank’ is 100% green and free!”

Table of X-Yacht electric propulsion rangesBecause the X4⁹E is designed for long distance cruising, it also has an auxiliary 11kW Fischer Panda diesel generator for when long range is required but the wind is not cooperating. Range on pure electric power is highly dependent on boat speed, wind and sea conditions, but a conservative estimate in calm conditions is 22.7 nautical miles at 5 knots.

To give an idea of ​​the kind of range to expect from the electric-powered X-Yacht, Oceanvolt has provided these use cases (conditions assumption for all examples is no wind / no waves).

CASE 1: Battery bank full or nearly full, need to travel long distances under power.

  • The generator provides full power (11kW) to both ServoProps, i.e. they run at 5.5kW each.
  • The boat can travel at 6.7 knots
  • The fuel consumption of the generator will be 3.8 liters per hour: 1.7 NM per liter of fuel consumed
  • X4⁹E can continue with this configuration until the diesel in the tank is consumed

CASE 2: Need to recharge the battery bank under generator power.

  • The power of the ServoProps must be reduced to a level below 5.5 kW each, for example to 4 kW.
  • The generator delivers 11 kW: 8 kW for the ServoProps and 3 kW to recharge the battery.
  • Boat speed will be reduced to 6 knots
  • Fuel consumption remains at 3.8 liters per hour.
  • After 10-12 hours max. the battery bank is fully charged, X4⁹E can continue as in case 1

CASE 3: 15 NM miles to destination. Battery bank 80% full, crew want to travel as fast as possible to their destination under engine.

  • With both ServoProps running at full power of 2 x 10kW, the boat will cruise at 7.8 knots. It will therefore take approx. 2 hours to reach destination.
  • Battery bank is 80% full – not enough to power ServoProps to destination.
  • The generator must be started.
  • The generator will provide 11kW to ServoProps, the battery bank will provide the remaining 9kW
  • The boat will be brought to its destination at full power.

Another great success

The X4⁹E is also equipped with solar panels, which are widely used to supply electricity to the boat’s “hotel load”: lighting, navigation systems, household appliances, etc. For those not planning on blue water cruising, the boat is also available as an all-electric model without any diesel generation.

X49E under sailJohn Morsing said: “Finding the right project for our first electric-powered X-Yacht was crucial. John Haurum knows our boats well and has a strong passion for green and quiet sailing.”

For his part, the proud new owner says, “Sailing is about harnessing the wind for power and fun, and committing to electric propulsion is a mindset and perhaps a lifestyle change. at sea. X-Yachts and Oceanvolt have taken that mindset to the next level, and looking back at X-Yachts’ heritage and innovation, I’m sure it will be another great success.

X-Yachts website Oceanvolt website

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Round the Island Race 2022: how to follow – spectator’s guide https://saltwaterconnections.org/round-the-island-race-2022-how-to-follow-spectators-guide/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 07:59:49 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/round-the-island-race-2022-how-to-follow-spectators-guide/ Don’t miss any of the Round the Island Race 2022 action with this spectator’s guide. We outline the different ways you can catch up on the race from the shore or from home The Round the Island Race is one of the most popular sailing races in the world, with thousands of boats regularly taking […]]]>

Don’t miss any of the Round the Island Race 2022 action with this spectator’s guide. We outline the different ways you can catch up on the race from the shore or from home

The Round the Island Race is one of the most popular sailing races in the world, with thousands of boats regularly taking part. Not only that, but it’s one of the few occasions in the sport that manages to bring together such a diverse array of participants to compete against each other, as will again be the case for the 2022 Round the Island Race.

This year, the Tour de l’île race celebrates its 90th anniversary. What began as a race for 25 runners in 1931 has grown to a peak of over 1,800 competitors. For many sailors, the race around the island is an annual celebration not to be missed on a summer day. For others, it’s a battle of wits over a complex course, involving shifting currents, unpredictable breezes and idiosyncratic tides.

Many of the competitors will be big names in the sport with Olympians and offshore legends taking part regularly. As such, the Round the Island race represents a unique day of sailing, offering the chance to test yourself directly against sailing heroes.

As with much of the sporting calendar, the Round the Island Race has been seriously affected by Covid over the past few years and the 2022 Round the Island Race is the race’s first real return to its usual late June timeslot.

When does the Round the Island Race 2022 start?

With so many participating boats, it would be virtually impossible to get everyone under way at once, so Round the Island Race competitors are divided into fleets of vessels with similar performance levels.

The article continues below…


Dame Ellen MacArthur is scheduled to compete in the annual Round the Island Race on Saturday, June 25, 2022, returning…

Registration for the 2021 Round the Island Race is now open

The Round the Island Race is a unique event in the sporting calendar and is one of…


The fastest boats start first to avoid the whole fleet converging on one section of the course at the same time. This year, the first departure will be at 08:00 BST.

Round the Island Race 2022 starting order:

Start time: 0800 (BST)
Open 60
IRC group 0
CRI Group 1
Class 40
Clipper Yachts

Start time: 0810
Multihull Grand Prix and MOCRA Racing
Multihull gangway
catamaran cruise
Diameter 24
Gaffers Divisions 1, 2 & 3

Start time: 0820
sports boat
J/70
Solar Sail 41.0

Start time: 08:30
ISC Group 4 grading system

Start time: 08:40
CRI Group 2
J/80
D/88

Start time: 0850
CRI Group 3

Start time: 0900
ISC Group 5 grading system

Start time: 0910
ISC Group 6 grading system
Classic Racing Yachts racing under ISCRS
Modern classic racing yacht races under IRC

Start time: 0920
ISC Group 7 grading system
Norse Folkboat

Start time: 0930
ISC Group 8 grading system

On the Isle of Wight? Observe from the shore…

As the excitement builds, you’ll want a fantastic vantage point to watch the action. The table below shows the best viewpoints at each stage of the race along with directions on how to get there. Get ready to drive around the island yourself or find a spot and stick to it, it’s up to you!

Cowes (debut) 0800 – 0930 Via Ward Avenue, Baring Road and Castle Hill to the Parade and the Green either side of the Royal Yacht Squadron.
applique point 0930 – 1200 From Yarmouth head towards Freshwater. Turn right after 1/2 mile and follow signs for Fort Victoria.
The needles 0930 – 1200 From Freshwater or Totland, follow signs to Needles car park. Park and walk up West High Down to Needles Battery. Best view south of Coast Guard station.
Chilton China 1045 – 1400 Located on the cliffs near Brightstone is Chilton Chine (accessible from the military road). It has a wonderful view of the boats sailing by.
Pointe Sainte-Catherine 1130 – 1530 From Freshwater, Rookley or Ventnor, go to Niton. Take the loop road to Buddle Inn. Park and walk down the cliffs near the lighthouse.
Ventnor 1145 – 1600 Park on the cliff at the west end of the Esplanade.
bonchurch 1200 – 1630 Take the path to the sea opposite Bonchurch Pond. Turn left and park in the parking lot below, which is the best view.
culver down 1230 – 1730 From Brading, take the road to Bembridge. After 1 mile turn right and follow the sign for Culver (in a bend and hairpin lane!)
Ryde Pier 1330 – 1830 From Ryde Esplanade walk up the pier and park at the end. Parking for 1 hour.
Cowes (arrival) 0930 – 2000 Via Ward Ave., Baring Road and Castle Hill to the Parade and the Green either side of the Royal Yacht Squadron.

Alternatively, you can stay in the Race Village, located on the Parade in Cowes, where there will be entertainment, food and drink, and the chance to chat with race sponsors Helly Hansen, Raymarine and the Ellen MacArthur CancerTrust.

But if you’re not lucky enough to be present in person when the starting gun is fired, don’t worry, there are plenty of ways to follow the race, wherever you are.


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Excitation building for the AEGEAN 600 https://saltwaterconnections.org/excitation-building-for-the-aegean-600/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:33:01 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/excitation-building-for-the-aegean-600/ Excitation building for the AEGEAN 600 by Offshore Racing Congress Jun 22 13:51 UTC July 10, 2022 The fleet will start and end under the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounio © Nikos Alevromytis Teams from all over the world are registered for next month’s AEGEAN 600, the second edition of this iconic race […]]]>

Excitation building for the AEGEAN 600

by Offshore Racing Congress Jun 22 13:51 UTC
July 10, 2022

The fleet will start and end under the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounio © Nikos Alevromytis

Sailing GP GBR x Henri-Lloyd 2022 SW
Marskeel 2019 600x500


Teams from all over the world are registered for next month’s AEGEAN 600, the second edition of this iconic race off the Aegean Sea.

With a month to go, an impressive fleet of 37 participants have registered so far, representing 14 nations spread out from as close as Greece to Australia. This group of monohulls and multihulls is a more diverse international fleet compared to the inaugural edition of this event last year.

“We are very happy with this participation”, declared Ioannis Maragkoudakis, Commodore of the Helenic Offshore Racing Club (HORC), organizer of the AEGEAN 600. “Having so many teams coming from all over Europe and the world is an indication for their enthusiasm and passion to enjoy with us this exceptional region for offshore sailing.Skippers, crews and their friends and families are welcome to come and participate in all the activities associated with the event, and of course enjoy a generous portion of Greek hospitality.

The fleet will begin its 605-mile voyage around 13 islands in the Aegean archipelago on Sunday July 10. The start line will be located below the cliffs of Cape Sounio where the Temple of Poseidon and race spectators will tower over the fleet as it heads southeast towards its first island on the course, the island of Milos. The remaining legs will take the fleet on an anti-clockwise circuit that includes rounds at Santorini, Kassos, Karpathos, Rhodos, Kandelousa, Kos, Kalolimnos, Farmakonissi, Patmos, Agathonissi, Mikonos and Kea before crossing arrival at Cape Sounio.

They will meet all wind conditions, from light air to the fresh breeze of the Meltemi which can exceed 30 knots. It really is a challenge fit to test all offshore sailors, as it has been for Greek sailors for thousands of years.

Participating teams will benefit from free mooring at the official site of the event, the Olympic Marina of Lavrion. It is an exceptional world-class facility located just 30 minutes drive south of Athens International Airport which has all the support services needed by deep-sea sailors, from transportation, launching, logistics and repairs to markets, cafes, restaurants and lounges in a Race Village for relaxation.

HORC organizers have also planned pre-race safety training seminars, as well as opening and closing ceremonies, a dinner reception and sightseeing trips to the Temple of Poseidon – all just a few examples of famous Greek hospitality. of this region.

“It’s a fantastic event,” said Elio Petraci, manager of last year’s winner Atalanta II, a Farr/Felci 70 from Italy. “It’s one of the most beautiful pieces I’ve ever done in my life.” Atalanta II set the existing course record of 2D 23H 54M.

The strong participation and the interest aroused by this second edition of the AEGEAN 600 unfortunately does not include enough sailors in double to constitute a valid event of the ORC DH European Championship, this one is therefore postponed to a next edition. . HORC and ORC organizers still believe this is an ideal venue for this championship and will work diligently to organize and promote a future event.

For more information on the AEGEAN 600, visit aegean600.com.

Zhik 2022 MPU Hooded Towel
Musto 2017 300x250 Surefooted

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The 40m trimaran concept aims to be the first zero-emission superyacht https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-40m-trimaran-concept-aims-to-be-the-first-zero-emission-superyacht/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 00:05:41 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-40m-trimaran-concept-aims-to-be-the-first-zero-emission-superyacht/ Rob Doyle is part of the new generation of yacht designers tackling the modern challenges of the large yacht industry. With a solid 20-year career path in the large yacht business, he and Van Geest Design came together to present a 40-meter sailing catamaran – Domus. With an interior volume that rivals a 60 meter […]]]>

Rob Doyle is part of the new generation of yacht designers tackling the modern challenges of the large yacht industry. With a solid 20-year career path in the large yacht business, he and Van Geest Design came together to present a 40-meter sailing catamaran – Domus. With an interior volume that rivals a 60 meter motor yacht, she aims to do eco-responsible cruising and become the first “zero emission” yacht over 750 GT.

“Just because superyachts are what they are today doesn’t mean they have to stay that way. We were constantly looking at every aspect of the design and wondering ‘is there a better way? We truly believe this project will redefine what a multihull sailing superyacht can be,” say the designers.

Domus, i.e. a one-storey house built around a Latin atrium, the yacht is 35 m wide and has an interior space of 780 m², all on one deck. The craft borrows aspects of this design to create an elevated and open feel on board. Rob Doyle and Van Geest Design have done extensive research into the practicalities and safety features associated with trimarans.

The trimaran is spread over two decks. She can accommodate 12 guests in six guest cabins, with four VIPs and two full-size owner suites, each equipped with its own lounge area. There is a bar in the main lounge. Other amenities include a cinema room, gym and lounge. Domus also has a spa area with swimming pool, making trimaran fun and excitement.

Inside the 40m Domus superyacht

To help reduce drag and improve speeds, it can heel to a two-degree angle. It will also ensure comfortable cruising with minimal rolling. Domus is designed with a focus on performance. “The unique design combination of solar power, hydro-regeneration technology and hydrogen fuel cells gives Domus unlimited range with zero emissions,” the design team said. The trimarans powers during daylight hours and transfers to the battery system at night. It also means that Domus is completely silent with zero emissions at anchor.

Alongside the 40-meter concept, the designer duo is also working on a larger version of the shipyard idea. “We are convinced that if you want to benefit from the advantages of multihulls over 40 meters in size, the only practical solution is a trimaran,” added the design team.

Compared to catamarans, trimarans offer lower costs. Domus has all the systems and engineering in the center hull, just like a standard build to keep things simple. The main hull takes all the rigging forces, thus keeping the transom structures simpler and generally the overall system being simpler. The team behind Domus have been behind the design of over 60 superyachts and have extensive design experience, knowledge and detailed data, making it easy to complete a gigantic project.

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Thrash to start Newport Bermuda Race >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News https://saltwaterconnections.org/thrash-to-start-newport-bermuda-race-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 18:11:07 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/thrash-to-start-newport-bermuda-race-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ With forecasts looking fresh to spooky for at least the first 36-48 hours of the race, a fleet of 187 sailboats are ready to take on the challenge of the 2022 Newport Bermuda Race on June 17 from 1310 hours. The pre-race forecast calls for southwesterly winds between 17 and 22 knots at the start […]]]>

With forecasts looking fresh to spooky for at least the first 36-48 hours of the race, a fleet of 187 sailboats are ready to take on the challenge of the 2022 Newport Bermuda Race on June 17 from 1310 hours.

The pre-race forecast calls for southwesterly winds between 17 and 22 knots at the start and continuing well into the evening, with waves up to 8 to 10 feet offshore. A cold front is expected to pass over the fleet on the first night, bringing with it squalls and strong winds.

After the front, winds are forecast to shift to a northwesterly quadrant and remain in the 20s, with higher gusts. In short, everything is preparing for a “real” Newport Bermuda Race in the ocean.

Record Run a possibility
The record in major divisions—St. David’s Lighthouse (limits on professional crew) and Gibbs Hill Lighthouse (no limits) – is 39 hours and 39 minutes, set by George David’s maxi yacht Rambler 90 in 2012, an average speed of 16 knots.

The Open Division course record is 34 hours and 42 minutes (average speed 18.3 knots), set by the 100ft maxi yacht Comanche, skippered by North Sails chairman Ken Read, in 2016. ( Open Division yachts are not eligible for general race prizes.)

This year’s fleet includes two multihulls capable of some fast speeds, including Jason Carroll’s MOD70 Argo (New York City) and the 80ft VPLP trimaran Ultim’emotion2, owned by Antoine Rabaste (Nîmes, France) and skippered by Jacek Siwek (Overijse, Belgium).

In the 2018 Bermuda Race, the first time multihulls were entered, Carroll and his crew sailed the Gunboat 62 Elvis to take top honors in 63 hours. Carroll then switched to the foil-assisted trimaran Argo and set seven race or world records. The Newport Bermuda Race multihull record could well be next.

“It looks like a tough, but fast race for us,” said Chad Corning, 50 (New Rochelle, New York), crew member and program manager. “We should have a gusty pre-frontal breeze all the time.

“Our elapsed time looks like 28 hours on the Global Forecast System and 26 hours on the European model. The high resolution (HRR) model is just being developed, but they all seem pretty consistent. We will have to balance caution and speed, so we will probably sail at 92% of the polars.

The unique and notable entry in the Open Division is Mālama, the new foil-assisted IMOCA 60 launched by 11th Hour Racing and skipper Charlie Enright (Barrington, Rhode Island) for The Ocean Race next year, from Spain in January 2023. Could Mālama surpassed Comanche’s open division mark?

“Yes, it’s totally possible, but it’s never that simple,” said Enright, 37, who is preparing for his third round-the-world race. “A lot depends on the timing of the front, and the biggest variable is the sea state. I feel like we’re going 30 knots every time we leave the dock. We have reached a maximum of 38 knots, but breaking records is more about high sustained average speeds.

A race of challenges
Since its inception in 1906, the Bermuda Race has presented different types of challenges, including navigation, seamanship and personal limits. Navigation plays a huge role as the fleet traverses the Gulf Stream, the warm ocean current that flows from the northeast off the east coast of the United States. Navigating in a favorable current where the Stream meanders and avoiding contrary currents on the wrong side of the whirlpools is often the key to victory.

It’s a test of seamanship because you have to get the boat, the sails and the fittings to work correctly to finish and win, judging when to press hard and when to slow down a little to preserve the boat’s equipment. Likewise, it is a test of personal limits as sleep deprivation and lack of food become major factors for a crew when the going gets tough.

“The call is racing history,” said 74-year-old Michael Cone (Philadelphia, Pa.), who won the coveted St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy in 2014 with his vintage Hinckley 40 Actaea. “The competition is exciting. It’s a real test, it’s a marathon and it demands something different from the sailor. The Bermuda race athlete needs to understand that he is fatigued and how to deal with it.

The fleet is divided into eight divisions, creating eight races in one among similar boats and crews: Double (16 entered), Finisterre (40), Gibbs Hill Lighthouse (18), Multihull (2), Open (1), Spirit of Tradition (1), St. David’s Lighthouse (108) and Superyacht (1). Of the eight divisions, 19 classes were formed. (Note: Fleet size is subject to change based on start time.)

The smallest boat in the fleet is Thomas O’Connell’s J/99 Finale (Stonington, Conn.) at 32.6 feet, entered in the double-handed division. “She’s a tenth over the minimum length,” said O’Connell, 75, from Sussex, England.

Not only is he sailing the smallest boat in the fleet, he is also taking part in his first Newport Bermuda Race. “I always wanted to race, but my previous boats wouldn’t have passed the inspection. I’m tickled pink for racing. Doing it in pairs only adds another challenge.

The largest vessel, the steel-hulled fishing schooner Columbia, owned by Martin Sutter (Austin, Texas), is 141 feet in overall length. Columbia is modeled after the original 141-foot Gloucester wooden fishing schooner built in 1923.

Legend has it that the original Columbia was the only American fishing schooner that could challenge the famous Canadian schooner Bluenose in the 1920s. perfect for covering the course at record speed, as predicted by the forecasts.

Among other monohulls, Oakcliff Sailing’s maxi yacht OC86 (née Windquest), with Hall of Fame sailor Dawn Riley in charge, is one to watch, as is the Volvo 70 Il Mostro, campaigned by Atlas Ocean Racing. of Canada.

Another competitor is the popular Mills 68 Prospector, owned by Lawrence Landry (Shelter Island Heights, New York), Paul McDowell (New York) and Martin Roesch (Fulton, Maryland).

“We feel good with the boat and its preparations, thanks to our captain Terence Glackin,” said McDowell. “It looks like hard work for the first 24-36 hours, it probably won’t be much fun, but it should be quick. We’ve covered over 10,000 nautical miles with this boat since 2016, so we’re confident we’re well prepared.

The youth is served—once again
About 65 participants from 2018 return this year, including seven class winners. There are young sailors spread throughout the fleet, like 16-year-old Ella Orem (Belmont, Mass.), E-steward on her grandfather’s Naiad 440 Wassail. The Mudratz Offshore team returns for their second race, this time aboard the Corel 45 Spitfire. The seven young sailors, among a crew of 11, are on average 18 years old.

One of the youngest crew in this year’s race, probably in Bermuda racing history, is the 40ft Oakcliff Blue – Team Bitter End.

Skippered by 18-year-old Sophia Comiskey (Tiverton, Rhode Island), the 10-person crew includes eight young women from Rhode Island, ages 16-19, classmates together at Lincoln School (Providence, Rhode Island), plus the turn of -world sailor Libby Greenhalgh and Maya Hoffman as onboard coaches.

The girls, who are each competing in their first race in Bermuda, have been training for the race since last year. Together they covered more than 2,000 nautical miles preparing for the Bermuda Race.

“Yeah, I’m nervous, but more excited,” said Elizabeth Gardner, 17 (Newport, Rhode Island), the headsail trimmer. “In some of our practices, there have been times when I’m on deck at night and there’s gusts and I think, ‘I don’t want to do this.’

“I try to turn things around and be like, ‘I have to do this. It helps to put things into perspective. We make history. It’s a unique experience with all of us together. Maybe this will be the last time together, depending on who’s left to sail. We are very confident and we think we have managed the preparation for the race well.


Event Information – Race Details – Entry List – Tracker

The 52nd race of the Newport Bermuda Race, co-hosted by the Cruising Club of America (CCA) and the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club (RBYC), is scheduled to start Friday, June 17, 2022 at the entrance to the East Passage of Rhode Narragansett Bay island, with the first warning signal scheduled for 1:00 p.m.

First held in 1906, the Bermuda Race is the oldest of the five major 600 nautical mile races and is preceded only by the Transatlantic Race. The 2022 fleet has 187 participants who will be divided into eight divisions: Double, Finisterre (for cruisers), Gibbs Hill Lighthouse, Multihull, Open, Spirit of Tradition, St. David’s Lighthouse and Superyacht.

Source: CAC

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Launch of the new Jeanneau Yachts 65 by Philippe Briand https://saltwaterconnections.org/launch-of-the-new-jeanneau-yachts-65-by-philippe-briand/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:52:30 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/launch-of-the-new-jeanneau-yachts-65-by-philippe-briand/ Inside 65m Resilience of ISA The 65 meter ISA Classic motor yacht Resilience was completed at the Palumbo Superyachts shipyard in Ancona. The yacht spans all 6 decks, her exterior and interior design was developed by the design team Enrico Gobbi while the technical team of Palumbo Superyachts were the naval architects. Edmiston and RGB […]]]>

Inside 65m Resilience of ISA

The 65 meter ISA Classic motor yacht Resilience was completed at the Palumbo Superyachts shipyard in Ancona. The yacht spans all 6 decks, her exterior and interior design was developed by the design team Enrico Gobbi while the technical team of Palumbo Superyachts were the naval architects. Edmiston and RGB Marine oversaw the project on behalf of the owner and acted as the owner’s representatives. Videoworks has created the most sophisticated technologies for home entertainment, audio/video, lighting and home automation on the Resilience 65m. Constructed of steel and aluminum, the yacht’s interior layout features six cabins with a seventh convertible, including a full-width owner’s suite located on the main forward deck. Measuring over 1400 GT, Resilience has huge volumes and clever design. “Nothing is left to chance in this design. Even the two-tone blue and white exterior paint has been designed for the same purpose as the black portholes, which is to give the yacht a streamlined and dynamic profile from bow to stern on the entire length of the hull.Another distinctive feature that lightens its shape and makes it more elegant is the design of the mast, with two large wings supporting the satellite domes and further lengthening the profile.The interior design has been studied in collaboration with Carlo Lionetti co-director of interiors for Team for Design on Resilience.We wanted to express a modern and refined style showing an equally meticulous attention to the use of steel and to detail in general”, comments Enrico Gobbi of Team for Design. From the lower deck, the 4×4 meter transom door lines up flush with the platform pool when lowered, which, combined with the two open side doors, transforms the entire area into a beach club with a extent of more than 180 m². Versatility and lighting effects are the key elements of this part of the lower deck, which consists of a lounge area, bar, showers, gym, sauna, massage room and a reception area for the embarkation/disembarkation of guests from the annexes. The beach club has three different accesses to the rest of the yacht: an exterior staircase from the aft deck, an interior staircase to the right of the massage area, and a panoramic corridor passing through a transparent glass enclosure which, passing through the engine room , directly connects the beach club to the lower deck lobby and guest cabins. The lower deck has four large guest cabins connected to the main deck by a circular staircase. This staircase connects all decks and features a stunning installation of glass jellyfish in different colors (designed by Arch. Gobbi and made by Preciosa) that accompanies the view skyward. A tribute to the sea, this work of art symbolizes the vastness of the ocean and the harmony of forms and movement and is magnificent when lit up at night. The large main living and dining room, with large sofas and a dining table for 12 people has been designed with doors that open on all sides so that when they are all open they can also form a contiguous part of the rear pool area. The sliding partition doors between the living room and the dining room allow these spaces to be combined into one large room or separated, making the whole space extremely flexible depending on the required use. The 6 meter long swimming pool located at the back and equipped for swimming against the current is certainly a scenic element. The cockpit is completed by a large C-shaped sofa with a coffee table and a forward sofa. The foredeck deck accommodates the built-in bridge with separate radio room, the captain’s cabin and the sixth VIP cabin with private sundeck. Towards the stern is a comfortable and very private owner’s office with a sundeck and bathroom. After the hall, there is the very spacious sky lounge. It has comfortable sofas designed for lounging and watching movies, and a bar with a marvelous transparent Edelweiss grand piano. The sundeck has a hinged system of pocketed door openings that can either fully open this deck or close it and cool it in the midsection for use in inclement or very hot weather. Starting from the bow, the secluded mosaic hot tub allows guests to fully enjoy moments of relaxation, with large sun pads alongside and an outdoor shower for rinsing off. A set of semi-circular glass doors in the interior under the hardtop provides access to the hall staircase, then through a second sliding door we reach the terrace lounge and dining areas. These are naturally lit by the two symmetrical side fanlights, one above the dining table (for 12 guests), and the other above the relaxation area. custom-made circular fireplace in crackled glass and polished stainless steel. Here there are also more sunbathing areas and a large barbecue area. Above the main terrace, Resilience has another terrace: the observatory terrace. This provides a very private sunbathing area and a small coffee table with chairs where guests can enjoy a unique panoramic view in complete privacy and peace. Equipment on board includes two jet skis, a 27ft guest tender and a 19ft crew tender. 2 MTU 12V engines of 1500kW each reach a maximum speed of 17.5 knots, cruise at 14 knots and offer a range of 5500 nautical miles at 11 knots. Resilience is available for hire through Edmiston. Palumbo Superyachts took root in 2008, when the Columbus Yachts brand was established, and in 2011 launched its first 54m superyacht, iconically christened Prima (the first). Currently, Palumbo Superyachts includes a representative office in Monaco and a logistics network of five shipyards in the Mediterranean (Ancona, Malta, Marseille, Naples and Savona); it also operates the following brands: ISA Yachts, Columbus Yachts, Mondomarine and Palumbo SY Refit.Credits: @blueiprod; Tom van Oossanen/courtesy ISA Yachts

June 14, 2022

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Karver KFEC Eco Furlers – A Better Future and a Better Furler https://saltwaterconnections.org/karver-kfec-eco-furlers-a-better-future-and-a-better-furler/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/karver-kfec-eco-furlers-a-better-future-and-a-better-furler/ Karver KFEC Eco Furlers – A Better Future and a Better Furler by Aleix Escorsell Jun 11 08:00 UTC KFEC Eco hose reel © Karver It is up to us, sailors, navigators, sailors and adventurers, to act for the preservation of the oceans, our formidable playground. Innovations are flourishing, mentalities and habits are changing, […]]]>

Karver KFEC Eco Furlers – A Better Future and a Better Furler

by Aleix Escorsell Jun 11 08:00 UTC

KFEC Eco hose reel © Karver


It is up to us, sailors, navigators, sailors and adventurers, to act for the preservation of the oceans, our formidable playground. Innovations are flourishing, mentalities and habits are changing, builders and designers are now giving priority to the eco-design of boats and fittings, and in search of more ecological materials.

In this article, we highlight the innovative construction technology of the Eco Concept range of furlers and commend Karver Systems for its contribution to the environment.


Background

The French hardware Karver is well known on pontoons for the reliability of its products but has also been committed for a long time to the environment. As early as 2005 they launched a range of pulleys with flax fiber cheeks, and now over 17 years later they present an Eco Concept Furler range, which received a special mention at the 2021 DAME Awards.

It is an extension of their very popular range of KF V3 furlers which have proven themselves on many high-performance IMOCA 60s, Transat Jacques Vabre and offshore multihulls.


KF V3 environmental references

The introduction of Karver’s V3 reels was a major upgrade filled with significant improvements to the well-known KF range. However, this Eco Concept furler, launched in January 2022, goes a significant step further. The carbon fiber in the drum/wheel has been replaced with flax/flax fibers and bio resins, giving the drum a natural look with limited compromise in performance.

By using linen, Karver has chosen to work with a material that is not only natural, but also renewable. In addition, the French manufacturer has chosen to source linen grown and woven locally in France, thus minimizing the ecological impact of its manufacturing process.

Additionally, Karver took the innovative step of creating a cast stainless steel fork for the drum and swivel. This greatly reduces the amount of waste involved in the manufacturing process, but also creates a stronger and more durable fitting. Karver used the Eco Concept furler to develop the production technology for this component and plans to roll it out across the KF V3 range in the future.


The KFEC range

The Karver KFEC Eco Concept furler is available in four sizes: KFEC1.5, KFEC3.0, KFEC4.5 and KFEC6.0 (where the number reflects the safe working load (SWL) of the unit in tonnes) which are suitable to code zero and asymmetric spinnaker furling on boats from 30 to 60 feet.

The wide range of KF V3 accessories are compatible with Eco reels to provide a complete and integrated reeling solution.


Summary

Here is an ecological and eco-responsible product, as reliable, durable and light as its high-performance cousins, without increasing the price!

The Karver range of KFEC Eco Concept furlers are the right choice for your performance, your peace of mind and for the oceans!

To find out more about the Karver KFEC furler, click on the link below, or if you would like more information, contact us at


Shop KFEC Reels





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Hublot – Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud – Style & Trends https://saltwaterconnections.org/hublot-classic-fusion-chronograph-bol-dor-mirabaud-style-trends/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 14:41:33 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/hublot-classic-fusion-chronograph-bol-dor-mirabaud-style-trends/ As of today, the 83rd Bol d’Or Mirabaud and Hublot invite its new ambassador, Alan Roura, for a short stopover in Geneva. It was an opportunity to talk to him about the activities he organizes to pass on his love of sailing to future generations. Official Timekeeper of the Bol d’Or Mirabaud since 2013, Hublot […]]]>

As of today, the 83rd Bol d’Or Mirabaud and Hublot invite its new ambassador, Alan Roura, for a short stopover in Geneva. It was an opportunity to talk to him about the activities he organizes to pass on his love of sailing to future generations. Official Timekeeper of the Bol d’Or Mirabaud since 2013, Hublot has imbued its limited series Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud with everything that makes the Bol d’Or Mirabaud so emblematic: the blue waters often rendered too calm by a lack of of wind and the wild, tumultuous waves that make this highly technical race famous.

Hublot Bol d’Or Mirabaud © Hublot

The Bol d’Or Mirabaud embodies Hublot’s Lake Geneva roots and its historical links with sailing and water sports. For this 83rd edition, the Swiss manufacture merges ocean racing and Lake Geneva regatta, inviting Alan to find the first shores he knew. Reminiscing about his Bol d’Or Mirabaud experiences, Alan explained that the best sailors and skippers love the technical waters of Lake Geneva. As the Bol d’Or Mirabaud boats finish their race by crossing the line at the Société Nautique de Genève, Alan will set off on the Arctic Vendée. We are proud and delighted to be able to support these legendary moments in the world of sailing, in Switzerland and around the world.” Ricardo Guadalupe CEO Hublot

I took part in the Bol d’Or three times and I have incredible memories of it. Unfortunately, I cannot participate this year as it clashes with other events on my sporting calendar, but I am delighted to be able to attend the press conference alongside Hublot, partner of my Vendée Globe IMOCA project. It’s an incredible event that sums up my love of sailing and my love for my home country, Switzerland. I hope the conditions will be perfect, that it will be a pleasure to watch and that I may come back next year!” Alan Roura Hublot Ambassador

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d'Or Mirabaud

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud © Hublot

Hublot & the Bol d’Or Mirabaud, two icons of Swiss innovation, performance and passion

Through its original iconic design from 1980, with the watch bezel fitted with signature screws reminiscent of a ship’s porthole. Through its sailing partnerships with the most iconic of races, from the oldest aboard the Luna Rossa in the 2007 America’s Cup, the toughest and most iconic of ocean races, with Alan Roura for his campaign Vendée Globe 2024, and the largest inland nautical regatta in the world as Official Timekeeper of the Bol d’Or Mirabaud since 2013.

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d'Or Mirabaud

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud © Hublot

Hublot, Official Timekeeper of the Bol d’Or Mirabaud since 2013

Attracting both amateurs and experienced sailors, the Bol d’Or Mirabaud brings together multihulls, monohulls, one-designs and prototypes. The Bol d’Or Mirabaud is 500 boats that run 123 kilometers from one end of the lake to the other, from Geneva to Bouveret, and back. This world famous Swiss regatta holds a special place in the heart of every Swiss sailor, who grew up with the Bol d’Or Mirabaud as a symbol of Swiss sailing. For local and Swiss sailors, it’s the Holy Grail, a kind of Swiss Vendée Globe. “Participating in the Bol d’Or is a key moment in the life of a sailor, no matter where he sails…” This is what Alan Roura said in 2017, as the race’s sponsor, a role that he accepted while circumnavigating the Brazilian coast during his first Vendée Globe. Before that, the Swiss skipper had won the Bol d’Or Mirabaud in 2013 in the Surprise category, a 7.64m boat, less than half the size of his IMOCA Hublot. The Surprise is a special boat for the Bol d’Or Mirabaud, as it is a one-design and the most popular class in the race. For the skippers, it’s an intense regatta, a sort of race within a race.

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d'Or Mirabaud

Official Timekeeper of the Bol d’Or Mirabaud since 2013 © Hublot

The Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud Special Edition

Designed for land and water, the sporty and elegant Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud features a 45 mm black ceramic case with alternating satin and matte finishes, a satin-brushed anthracite gray sunray dial and An anthracite technical fabric strap with intense navy blue stitching. These colors echo those of the waters of Lake Geneva, known for its capricious and unpredictable thermals, the blue of its waters changing from dark blue to intense black as the day turns into night, the boats leaving at 10 a.m. morning and very often arriving at the Société Nautique de Genève after dark.

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d'Or Mirabaud

Classic Fusion Chronograph Bol d’Or Mirabaud © Hublot

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“A passion has been ignited…” Observations from a Learn2Skiff Clinic in Hampton, VA https://saltwaterconnections.org/a-passion-has-been-ignited-observations-from-a-learn2skiff-clinic-in-hampton-va/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 15:01:25 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/a-passion-has-been-ignited-observations-from-a-learn2skiff-clinic-in-hampton-va/ Over Memorial Day weekend, fifteen sailors gathered at the Hampton Yacht Club in Hampton, Virginia for a Learn2Skiff introductory clinic sailing 29ers. Learn2Skiff is a program created by Phil Muller (founder of Skiff Generation and head coach of the 2NINER team in Miami, FL) to introduce young riders to 29er in an accelerated learning environment. […]]]>

Over Memorial Day weekend, fifteen sailors gathered at the Hampton Yacht Club in Hampton, Virginia for a Learn2Skiff introductory clinic sailing 29ers. Learn2Skiff is a program created by Phil Muller (founder of Skiff Generation and head coach of the 2NINER team in Miami, FL) to introduce young riders to 29er in an accelerated learning environment.

Many sailors were nervous before their first sail on a high-octane skiff, but their hesitation was replaced by excitement after a successful first morning on the water. And after three days of training, land exercises, discussions and debriefings, confidence levels and enthusiasm were at an all time high. As one parent commented following the clinic, “a passion ignited…”.

What makes the Learn2Skiff format so effective? For me, it boils down to the accelerated learning environment created by boats, mentoring and sailors:

  1. The Boats: The 29er is fast and unstable, making inevitable and frequent mistakes and capsizing. The Learn2Skiff format teaches sailors to rise to the challenge and includes many additional aids. With four 29ers, three coach boats and 15 sailors, there were always extra hands available and new sailors to rotate.
  2. Mentoring: One of the secrets of the Learn2Skiff format is that experienced 29er sailors sail alongside new sailors. Newbies at Hampton had an amazing chance sailing with experts Jake Julien and Cooper Delbridge, who showed off their technique and gave new sailors a chance to FEEL a fast and balanced boat. With the feeling fresh in their muscles and minds, they then attempted to recreate it as skippers and crews and with new partners, learning from their mistakes along the way.
  3. The Sailors: They taught each other. They supported each other. They bonded through shared adversity. Why? They were already taking up the collaborative approach that Phil calls the “skiff culture” (for more on the skiff culture, check out the 2NINER blog).

A great learning environment can be described in many ways. In the coachboat Phil mentioned the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) which a quick search on Wikipedia defined as:

“the distance between what a learner is able to do without help and what he can do with help.”

We started using “ZPD” as a shortcut, a kind of nickname for the learning zone. When sailors got tired or frustrated, more support was added to get them back into the ZPD. When sailors were coasting or complacent, a new boat handling move was introduced to increase the challenge and bring them back into the ZPD. It was clear that when learning to sail the 29er, it is never difficult to find a new challenge.

First produced in 1998, the 29er is not a new boat, but in many ways it is still relevant. He fulfills an important role as an international youth skiff and feeder for the Olympic 49er. Her hull, sails and rigging are surprisingly simple, but sailing well is a challenge for any sailor. And the steep learning curve prepares sailors for the challenges of modern sailing, whether in sports boats, multihulls, offshore or foiling.

Many thanks to the Hampton Yacht Club and HYC Sailing Director Maxwell Plarr for hosting an outstanding clinic and to Skiff Generation for providing boats and coaching. For more information on the 29er, visit https://us29er.org/ and https://www.29er.org/

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