Multihulls – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:26:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://saltwaterconnections.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Multihulls – Salt Water Connections http://saltwaterconnections.org/ 32 32 Positive Changes for Edgartown Race Weekend https://saltwaterconnections.org/positive-changes-for-edgartown-race-weekend/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:26:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/positive-changes-for-edgartown-race-weekend/ Positive Changes for Edgartown Race Weekend by Barby MacGowan Jan 7 09:26 PM UTC June 23-25, 2022 Last year, the round-the-island race at Edgartown Race Weekend hosted 78 boats. This year’s event has been moved from June 23 to 25. © Daniel Forster Edgartown Yacht Club has scheduled its Edgartown 2022 Race Weekend from June […]]]>

Positive Changes for Edgartown Race Weekend

by Barby MacGowan Jan 7 09:26 PM UTC
June 23-25, 2022

Last year, the round-the-island race at Edgartown Race Weekend hosted 78 boats. This year’s event has been moved from June 23 to 25. © Daniel Forster

Henr-Lloyd 2021 For the Love of Bad Weather MPU
Innovation North Sails 2021 - MPU

Edgartown Yacht Club has scheduled its Edgartown 2022 Race Weekend from June 23-25, moving the popular three-day event from its typical July time slot to “shoulder season” on Martha’s Vineyard, the popular island retreat. where it takes place. In addition, the Club announced that the event will run over two days of “Round-the-Sound” (‘RTS) races on Thursday and Friday before culminating with the renowned “Round-the-Island (‘ RTI) race. Race “Saturday.

The 56 nautical mile RTI race, set to start and end off the coast of Edgartown, has been an annual tradition on Martha’s Vineyard for 84 years, making it one of America’s oldest distance races. Last year 78 boats took part in the race, and it is expected that many of those participating in the ‘RTI this year will use the’ RTS as a warm-up. RTS races will be run between 20 and 25 nautical miles, around government marks on Vineyard Sound and Nantucket Sound (one race per day) and will be rated separately from the RTI with separate prices.

Classes include ORC, PHRF-NE (including Spinnaker, Non-Spinnaker and Double Handed divisions) and multihulls. Participating vessels must meet the safety and equipment requirements described on the regatta website.

The first 50 registrants paid for ‘RTI will benefit from two nights of free mooring. The registration fee for the ‘RTS includes one night of mooring for each day that participants register for the’ RTS. Those who register later will receive a mooring depending on the space available.

The current sponsors of Edgartown Race Weekend are Mount Gay Rum, North Sails, Regatta Craft Mixers, Hinckley Yachts, Storm Trysail Club and Team One Newport.

For more information on Edgartown Race Weekend, including NOR, go to www.rtirace.org or contact Margaret Passafiume, (508) 627-4364 x18.

Animated E6 MPU question mark
SW newsletter subscription


Source link

]]>
Good luck to pioneering multihull designer James Wharram https://saltwaterconnections.org/good-luck-to-pioneering-multihull-designer-james-wharram/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 20:47:10 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/good-luck-to-pioneering-multihull-designer-james-wharram/ Free-spirited sailor and pioneering multihull designer James Wharram died on December 14 at the age of 93. Wharram, who has occasionally contributed to Convenient boat owner magazine, made the first modern catamaran trip from west to east of the Atlantic aboard its 40-foot multihull, Rongo. There was nothing new to the concept of catamarans in […]]]>

Free-spirited sailor and pioneering multihull designer James Wharram died on December 14 at the age of 93.

Wharram, who has occasionally contributed to Convenient boat owner magazine, made the first modern catamaran trip from west to east of the Atlantic aboard its 40-foot multihull, Rongo.

There was nothing new to the concept of catamarans in the 1950s – Polynesians began to travel there thousands of years earlier.

Herreshoff had successfully experimented with catamaran designs as early as the 1870s, while a commodore at the New York Yacht Club at the same time imported a traditional catamaran from Polynesia.

But it was not until the 1950s that the modern multihull revolution finally began.

Much of the early pioneering was done by British designers, including Wharram, who sought simple and worry-free long-distance cruises.

Olympic canoeists Francis and Roland Prout, for their part, initially focused on the speed potential offered by multihulls.

Inspired by French sailor Eric De Bisschop’s pioneering journey from Hawaii to Marseille on his 38-foot double canoe / catamaran Kaimiloa in 1937/8, Wharram was keen to further prove the concept’s seaworthiness.

Pioneering journey

Tangaroa in Falmouth in 1955. Image courtesy of James Wharram Designs

In 1953 he designed and built a 23 foot 6 inch plywood “double canoe”.

Two years later, on September 27, 1955, Wharram sailed from Falmouth across the Atlantic to Trinidad aboard this flat-bottom catamaran called Tangaroa with two German daughters, Ruth Merseburger and Jutta Schultze-Rohnhoff as a crew, in an effort to prove that the design of the double canoe was a seaworthy vessel.

For the return trip, he built a 40-foot version on the beach in Trinidad, allegedly with the help of Bernard Moitessier, before sailing first to New York, then crossing the North Atlantic, to arrive in the River Conwy in North Wales, September 30, 1959.

It was the start of a prolific career that saw him designing dozens of distinctive V-hull catamarans, from 13 feet to over 60 feet.

He has sold over 10,000 sets of plans, with the bulk of the completed boats built by enthusiastic hobbyists.

Wharram was still sailing his designs at the age of 90.

1955-Falmouth - Jim, -Jutta, -Ruth

James Wharram pictured in Falmouth in 1955 with Jutta Schultze-Rohnhoff and Ruth Merseburger. Image courtesy of James Wharram Designs

Tangaroa-Jim-Biscay_1955

James Wharram aboard the Tangaroa crossing the Bay of Biscay in 1955. Image courtesy of James Wharram Designs

The success of the crossing made it possible to prove the seaworthiness of the catamarans, which was not recognized in the 1950s.

Famous designs

Wharram’s renowned multihulls included the Tiki 21, Cooking grease, which became the smallest catamaran to sail around the world when skippered by Rory McDougall from 1991 to 1997.

Rongo was designed and built by Wharram in Trinidad in 1957-58 after the three sailors had already crossed the South Atlantic in 1956 along the trade winds route from the Canaries to Trinidad in their small 23ft 6in catamaran Tangaroa, also designed and built by Wharram in England in 1954.

James-Wharram-Hanneke-Boon

James Wharram with Hanneke Boon. Image courtesy of James Wharram Designs

Free-spirited sailor

Wharram’s life partner Hanneke Boon paid tribute.

She said: “We are very sad to announce that on December 14, James Wharram left this earthly world, joining Ruth, Jutta and his many close friends who left before him.

“At 93, his mind set off on the journey to navigate the oceans of the sky.

“James was a trailblazer, a fighter with great determination and great vision. From an early age he followed his passions – roaming the hills – for a fair policy – for intelligent women – to navigate the seas – to prove that the Polynesian double canoe is a profession worthy of the ocean – to become a man of the sea.

“These passions made him a pioneer of catamaran sailing and a world-renowned designer of unique double canoe catamarans that now sail the oceans.

“He designed for people who wanted to get away from the mundane life, gave them boats they could build affordably and gave them the opportunity to become seafarers like him.

“The life he chose has never been easy, he has always fought convention and conventional thinking head on.

“His passionate and multi-faceted personality was very attractive to the strong and independent women who helped him in his activities, starting with the Ruth farm, without whom he would never have achieved his goals.

“Young Jutta joined them on their pioneering oceanic voyages and was the mother of her first son.

“Sadly, she passed away from a mental illness at a young age as a result of her traumatic childhood experiences during World War II.”

Ruth-and-jim-on-annie-1953

Ruth and James on Annie in 1953. Image courtesy of James Wharram Designs

Hanneke added: “James has lived his entire life openly with more than one woman at a time, up to five at his prime in the 1970s, with whom he built and sailed his boats.

“Next to Ruth, who died eight years ago at the age of 92, I was her other life partner and soul mate.

“I first met James while he was designing his line of classic designs in the 1960s, which led to him becoming a cult figure in alternative society in the 1970s.

“Over time I became his design partner and with Ruth we were an unbreakable unit.

“I gave birth to her second son and together we have given birth to many new models of double canoes.
The article continues below …


Ruth wharram

Wife of boat builder James Wharram has died aged 92

Although the post-war period was a time of scarcity – food rationing in the UK continued until 1954 – it…

The morning breeze was just beginning to be felt as we exited Port Vathi aboard the Ionian Spirit,…


“James has achieved all he set out to do in this life, but has only received public recognition from the establishment in recent years.

“The final project was his autobiography, published a year ago under the title “The people of the sea”, which he worked on for many years, as he was very critical of his own writing.

“We worked together to complete it and get it published.

“People referred to James as the great James Wharram, the living legend, but he didn’t see himself as such.

“He was aware that it was his great number of builders and sailors, their beautiful boats and their great voyages that created the famous Wharram World.

“He considered them to be the real heroes.

Ruth, -James, -Hanneke-2005

Ruth, James and Hanneke photographed in 2005. Image courtesy of James Wharram Designs

“Unfortunately, over the past few years, James’s brain, which he always referred to as a separate entity, started failing him due to Alzheimer’s disease.

“He was very grieved at losing his mental abilities and struggled with his diminished existence.

“He couldn’t face the prospect of further disintegration and made the call very hard to end it himself.

“It was with great courage that he lived his life and with great courage he decided that it was time to end.

“At this time of great loss, we should all remember the good and glorious times of a fulfilled life.

“This is not the end, me, us, everyone at Wharram will keep their work alive.”


Source link

]]>
Jubilant wins the Cockburn Sound regatta https://saltwaterconnections.org/jubilant-wins-the-cockburn-sound-regatta/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 23:11:21 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/jubilant-wins-the-cockburn-sound-regatta/ The Cockburn Sound Regatta, hosted by the Cruising Yacht Club of Western Australia, is a four-day event that takes place between Boxing Day and New Years Eve on the beautiful and protected waters of Mangles Bay off Rockingham. Conditions were light and very warm throughout the regatta with temperatures reaching 44 degrees on Day 1, […]]]>

The Cockburn Sound Regatta, hosted by the Cruising Yacht Club of Western Australia, is a four-day event that takes place between Boxing Day and New Years Eve on the beautiful and protected waters of Mangles Bay off Rockingham.

Conditions were light and very warm throughout the regatta with temperatures reaching 44 degrees on Day 1, but the sea breeze finally brought welcome relief to sailors and volunteers.

The Kwinana Industries Council race at Rockingham is the feed race for all Metropolitan based yachts and this year 17 have faced starter cannon to make the 14 nautical mile journey from Fremantle to join the rest of the fleet. The race started in an 18-knot northeast breeze which eventually faded to almost nothing. This of course favored the faster boats and Ray Martin’s Farrier F85SR, Beatrix took advantage of the course to reach and won both row honors and the eventual time adjusted prize.

Fifty boats of different sizes, types and dimensions took part in the regatta this year, up from last year’s total, including five beach multihulls which added a new dimension to the show. The monohulls were divided into three spinnaker divisions, four ib and main classes, premier cruising who also decided to sail without kites and a fleet of sports boats.

As usual, sailing consistently and making as few mistakes as possible has been just as important as it always has been in the race.

Salacia II. Pic – Shooting the Breeze Photography

Anthony Kirke skipper of the Botin Carkeek GP42 Enterprise NG was the fastest boat in Division 1. But the handicap did its job and it was Zuben’ubi skippered by Alan Anderson who won the first prize, ahead of the Salacia II of Ross Norgard and the Sagacious IV skippered by Chris De Behind. Zuben’ubi also came very close to winning the overall champion’s award. Enterprise topped the fleet on IRC to win every race and also the award for best dressed ashore crew. They were obviously training for their appearance at next year’s Sydney Hobart Race fashion shoot.

Division 2 was very close with four points separating the top three boats. Phil Slee made the trip from Bunbury with winning Miss Behavin from the local boat, Vintage Red, skippered by new member Michael Gillum. The conditions obviously suited the two S80s. Jolie Breeze, skippered by David Hepburn, was third.

Division 3 was really close. There was a point between the first and the fourth. It was Sam Threlfall’s Lady Irene who won by this single point over Kevin Sneddon’s Six Pak and Matt Rose’s Spacesailer 27, King Canute. Steve Morris on Freedom was an unlucky fourth, with those spots determined on the countdown.

The jib and the main competitors were split into three fleets and in JAM 1, Twitch, skippered by Betty Walsh in Barry’s absence, was on course to win over Neil Harrison on Deckchairs Overboard and Jason Poutsma on Stimulus Package . The latter also won the IRC Division award.

In JAM 2, Kevin Schroeder led Dragonheart to victory over Kim Klaka’s still-performing Panache II. It was great to see what was once a local boat in Dragonheart, reappear on Mangles Bay. Third place went to Mark Nicholas on K-Factor.

JAM 3 was another nearby fleet. Local member John Brabazon picked up a new sail for Christmas for his Rose boat, and won the Mandurah Spacesailer 27 Pegasus countdown, skippered by Mark Barrett. Mark beat his teammate Ross Davidson, sailing Legend, in third place by a single point. Naw the Noo, skippered by Dave Reid, finished fourth by two points behind, but received the Best Dressed Crew on the Water award for their Hawaiian-themed outfits.

The leading cruising fleet has sailed in spinnaker conditions this year and Ian Joel’s Jubilant Dixon design dominated the race to win the division. Serendipity, skippered by Rick Hoad, finished second, beating Eclipse race leader Max Palleschi.

Two boats side by side while sailing close-hauled.
The champion of the general classification of regattas Jubilant leads Eclipse. Pic – Shooting the Breeze Photography

Sports Boats provided the most interesting and tightest match racing again with the Elliot 7 Tiger, skippered by Gavin Taylor, returning to winning form and beating local sailor Trevor Taylor sailing No Etiquette in second place with Michael Jones on Pretty Woman in third. In low light conditions there were often only a few seconds between the boats and the starts were crucial, especially for the short Windward / Leeward courses.

This year we were joined by catamarans off the beaches and spectators had the pleasure of seeing a catamaran come out of the water on foils and appear to fly overhead. Flying Circus, skippered by Ryan Duffield, clearly won in Darren Smith’s Blew by you and Trevor Hughes’ Budgie Smuggler.

The general regatta champion is determined by a formula taking into account the raw point score of a boat and the sum of the total number of boats starting in each race in each division. It was very close between Jubilant, Zuben’ubi and Twitch but in the end, it was Ian Joel and his crew aboard Jubilant who won to take the palm.

Representing visiting and local sailors, Ian paid tribute to President Sonia Mason and her vast army of volunteers for hosting another successful regatta under difficult circumstances. There had been a fear of COVID in WA just before Christmas and the event was to be held under new restrictions.

By John Percy


Source link

]]>
Jarlath Cunnane pays tribute to pioneering multihull designer and sailor James Wharram https://saltwaterconnections.org/jarlath-cunnane-pays-tribute-to-pioneering-multihull-designer-and-sailor-james-wharram/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 06:27:36 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/jarlath-cunnane-pays-tribute-to-pioneering-multihull-designer-and-sailor-james-wharram/ Irish polar adventurer and boatbuilder Jarlath Cunnane paid tribute to the pioneering skills of fellow sailor and multihull designer James Wharram, who died earlier this month at the age of 93. Wharram, renowned for his Polynesian designs of double canoe style sailing catamarans, died on December 14 in Cornwall, Britain. “Some multihull designers find inspiration […]]]>

Irish polar adventurer and boatbuilder Jarlath Cunnane paid tribute to the pioneering skills of fellow sailor and multihull designer James Wharram, who died earlier this month at the age of 93.

Wharram, renowned for his Polynesian designs of double canoe style sailing catamarans, died on December 14 in Cornwall, Britain.

“Some multihull designers find inspiration on the computer screen,” Wharram said on his company’s website.

“I find inspiration when I’m afraid of the rapid approach of a huge white-crowned wave. It’s like the adrenaline rush of “how do I get out of this”? connects to “how do i get by?” », Explained the sailor and designer born in Manchester.

Cunnane first encountered Wharram in the mid-1970s when one of his ships limped in Achill Sound, Co. Mayo, needing some repairs.

Tehini was racing around Great Britain in 1974, skippered by Robert Evans and Maggie Oliver, when the beams broke. Robert limped into the sound of Achill, for repairs. Achill Sound seemed like a good spot as the map showed a convenient railroad track! Wharram and part of his team arrived to help

Her 51ft catamaran design named Tehini, piloted by Robert Evans and Maggie Oliver, was competing in the Round Britain race when several rolled ties broke.

“They had looked at the maps and noticed a rail link with Achill, which would be useful for delivering materials,” Cunnane recalls.

Wharram and several members of his team arrived in Mayo to help.

Beams replaced on TehiniBeams replaced on Tehini

“I was his agent in Ireland at the time, he called me and we had a really interesting time rebuilding new beams that were rotten over a period of about two weeks,” Cunnane said.

Wharram, who crossed the Atlantic in his home-built ship and undertook many other voyages with his partners Ruth Merseburger and Jutta Schultze-Rohnhof, kept in touch with Cunnane.

He moved from Milford Haven to New Ross, County Wexford for a time to set up his boat building and design business there, but returned to England. He had previously lived on board for some time in Dun Laoghaire harbor, after returning from a trip to the Caribbean.

“Wharram has always had several female partners,” Cunnane recalls. “It was part of his approach to be a little different. And he thanked them for helping him with his business.

“There was a time when people were building boats – and he was providing designs for self-built models – when now people are just going to buy them,” Cunnane explained.

“I built one of his catamarans for myself and finally sold it, and followed his practice of giving Polynesian names to all of his ships,” Cunnane said.

“Wharram was an amateur designer with no formal qualifications, but his Dutch partner Hanneke Boon took him to a new level with him, improving many of his designs,” Cunnane said.

Wharram would have hated the word “catamaran”, as recorded by Sam Fortescue in an interview with him for Sail magazine.

Fortescue explained that while studying construction engineering like his father, Wharram read Eric de Bisschop’s book on building a Polynesian double canoe Kaimiloa which he then sailed from Honolulu to Cannes in France. in 1936-37.

“Using the model of a fishing boat in the British Science Museum and de Bisschop’s rare descriptions, he built the 23-foot-6 Tangaroa catamaran in his parents’ garden in Manchester, miles from the sea. His father was appalled, ”Fortescue wrote.

Friends helped drive the two hulls of the Wharram about 200 miles from Brightlingsea on the English east coast of England. and he sailed to Emshaven, Germany, to recover Ruth and Jutta.

“After that, he aimed to cross the Atlantic, proving the seaworthiness of his primitive craft and validating the designs of the ancient Pacific Islanders.

“I never became the ‘great James Wharram’, except under the auspices of these two German women,” Wharram told Fortescue.

. “Indeed, I would say that in attitudes, I am partly post-war German. The Germans were really the pioneers of oceanic multihull cruising in the 1950s, especially with the Schwarzenfeld brothers, who built in steel. I was only fourth of about five at the time, ”Wharram added.

When Wharram and the two women sailed to Trinidad, a local newspaper sensationalized the relationship – at this point, Jutta was pregnant. They lived aboard a barge, and when it was destroyed in a storm, they built a new boat with American friends and French sailor Bernard Moitessier.

The new ship was named Rongo, after the Polynesian god of culture. They then set sail for New York via the Virgin Islands and found that the North American nautical community was more open to the concept of oceanic multihulls than the British sailing establishment. A third of its orders for more than 10,000 boats come from North America.

Cunnane recalls that Wharram liked to be an outsider, but also criticized this lack of acceptance from the British sailing “elite”. He and Hanneke Boon took his most ambitious design, the 63-foot Spirit of Gaia, built in 1992 around the world.

The couple sailed Spirit of Gaia to the Pacific to search for traditional sailing boats in 1995 and found a 200-year-old canoe with the same V-hull design on Tikapia Island.

In 2008-9, when Wharram was 80 years old, the couple embarked on the “Lapita” voyages, with the aim of proving that settlers could have reached the Pacific Islands from Southeast Asia. sail upwind with “crab claw sails”.

In April 2018, Wharram received this “establishment” recognition in his home country when he received a classic boat “Lifetime Achievement” award as a pioneering catamaran builder, sailor and designer of multihulls at the Royal Thames Yacht Club in London.

Rob Peak, editor of Classic Boat, recalled in his speech how, in 1956, Wharram made the first successful crossing of the Atlantic in a multihull – “the 23ft 6in (7.2m) Tangaroa, which he designed and built himself for £ 200 and sailed with two German girls “.

“In 1959, they were the first to cross the North Atlantic from West to East (New York to North Wales) aboard a multihull, the 40 foot catamaran Rongo, built in Trinidad. Since then he has sold over 10,000 of his cruising multihull designs worldwide, and some consider him to be the father of modern multihull sailing, ”said Peak.

“More than that, James has always understood that sailing is not about the expense. He has remained firmly committed to his “less is more” philosophy, always looking for simpler and more efficient ways to build and rig his designs. What should be noted in particular is her simple yet very efficient Wharram Wingsail rig. He’s 90 this year and shows no signs of stopping. He is, quite simply, a living legend, ”said Peak.

In Wharram’s own speech upon receiving the award, he said:

“Frank Lloyd Wright, the famous American architect, was once asked how he came to be famous. He replied: “I have lived longer than the others”. here today to receive this Lifetime Achievement Award for Classic Boat.

“So who were my competition? In the design of multihulls, there have been three areas of development, ”continues Wharram.

“Some multihull designers have focused on the narrow beam length ratio of individual hulls to achieve ‘speed’, faster than the maximum speed of fixed ballast monohull yachts, due to their wave drag,” a- he declared.

“Other designers have used the multihull raft configuration to create comfortable floating villas, as an alternative to buying expensive coastal land for a beachfront villa,” he continued.

“I belong to a third group of boaters and sailors, summed up in poetry, as in,“ I must descend back to the sea to the lonely sea and the sky. ”We ‘dreamers’ follow an essential part of the psyche human, consciously or unconsciously, ”he said.

“The development of early man has been viewed over the years from different angles. Until fairly recently the view was that of ‘Early Man the Great Hunter’, followed by women and children picking up their remains,” Wharram said.

However, with more studies of human DNA and other archaeological findings, it becomes clear that ‘Early Woman / Man’ followed coasts and rivers where fish and shellfish were abundant and easy to collect. The making of boats must have been one of the first skills of mankind. The first people to reach Australia, 60,000 years ago, arrived there by some kind of boat, ”he said. he declares.

“This archaic affinity with the sea and personal watercraft is in the DNA of all of us, and I think it drives us to want to own and pilot our boats. A lot of today’s sailors don’t care. not in competitive men’s sports, they are not interested in a villa on the sea, they are driven by a deep instinct of our species to be on or near water, ”said Wharram.

“Throughout my life, starting out as a crazy walker and pioneering catamaran navigator, I have been aware of this instinct and as a designer I have tried to express it in my boats. Having sold over 10,000 models, it looks like a lot of my builders are hooking up with this, ”he said.

“Classic Boat is a magazine that has always expressed the beauty of traditional personal watercraft and the love of being on the water in a beautiful boat. Over the years, I have enjoyed every issue and still keep them all, including figured out number 1, on my overflow library shelves, ”he said.

“I am honored to receive this award from a magazine that I appreciate and admire,” he concluded.


Source link

]]>
Rudeness with one side of the sail for the start of the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race • Live Sail Die https://saltwaterconnections.org/rudeness-with-one-side-of-the-sail-for-the-start-of-the-rolex-sydney-hobart-yacht-race-live-sail-die/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 04:35:36 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/rudeness-with-one-side-of-the-sail-for-the-start-of-the-rolex-sydney-hobart-yacht-race-live-sail-die/ “We are already fed up” “F ‘me” “What do you want me to do with Smuggler ?!” “Dude, calm down, we ruined the start” “Shut up and let Yvette do her job” “It was a fucking joke” “PING IT” “Make it easier to listen to Jib Whizzaaaaa !!!!!!!!!!!!!” “F me …” URM, Sail number: AUS72, […]]]>

“We are already fed up”

“F ‘me”

“What do you want me to do with Smuggler ?!”

“Dude, calm down, we ruined the start”

“Shut up and let Yvette do her job”

“It was a fucking joke”

“PING IT”

“Make it easier to listen to Jib Whizzaaaaa !!!!!!!!!!!!!”

“F me …”

URM, Sail number: AUS72, Owner: Anthony Johnston, Skipper: Marcus Ashley-Jones, Design: RP 72 Maxi © Rolex / Andrea Francolini

It was this great comment aboard URM, owned by Anthony Johnston and helmed by 18 ′ Skiff sailor Marcus Ashley-Jones, that kept me glued to the screen for the start of the Rolex Sydney Hobart 2021 .

Okay … let’s get in there.

Scallywag took the lead with Black Jack, then Law Connect. Law Connect was way too high for the first turn mark and looked pretty average as they tried to capitalize on their way. Black Jack struggled with the furl and gave Law Connect time, while Scallywag just got ahead.

Early 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart.  Photo: Salty Goofy

Early 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart. Photo: Salty Goofy

“They just couldn’t wind up and ended up close to the spectator fleet,” said expert commentator Jimmy Spithill, referring to Mark Bradford and his Black Jack team.

With the excitement of the first three boats going over the last turn mark and start heading south over, we were sent back to the other turn marks to see the rest of the fleet. The shaky images (these guys haven’t heard of a stabilizer) gave the illusion of being on board and we watched the yachts drop the sails and then hoist themselves up again for change.

It was nice to hear the commentators shout at Stacey Jackson and Adrienne Callahan as two very experienced women of the fleet, who were racing aboard the Hoek TC78, Oroton Drumfire.

Related Articles

Commercials on the live stream gave us a glimpse of Rolex watches and other luxury brands with a side of the McDonalds and Harvey Norman furniture offerings.

Meanwhile, back to feed and with the building to the south, we saw that Scallywag already had a reef in their main, as they settled in for a long night of bash, bash, bashing, Law Connect. was hot on their hip.

The weather models have the highs finishing in about 2 days / 4 hours, well outside the course record set in 2017 by LDV Comanche who completed the course in 1 day, 9 hours, 15 minutes and 24 seconds, breaking the course record for 1 day Perpetual Loyal. , 13 hours, 31 minutes and 20 seconds, set to the previous year.

Early 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart.  Photo: Salty Goofy

Early 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart. Photo: Salty Goofy

The entrance to the Army Sailing Club, Gun Runner was the last boat to leave Sydney Heads. The smallest boat in the fleet at just 9.3m – this lot still has a long way to go. Well done to you Gun Runner!

“We must have seen a record for the entire fleet racing the port! It was amazing! Jimmy was excited – maybe too many Red Bulls?

Meanwhile, Scallywag dropped his jib – it looked like it had come loose from the deck and the crew were trying to figure out what to do. The jib was flapping just to leeward as the crew tried to let go before a decision could be made on what to do. Jeepers… It’s right out of Sydney Heads! While all of this was going on, Law Connect zoomed in.

“The conditions are very bumpy here and I think there will be more than a handful of crews guessing this second serving of Christmas lunch right now,” said Spithill, a world-renowned expert in the field. lunch and navigation.

And yes! Wendy Tuck and Campbell Geeves on Speedwell, a Beneteau 34.7, get a mention in the doubles fleet! Before the start, Wendy said “I hope we finish before the 31st [December], we have no alcohol on board!

Then we went back to Black Jack who also had a little reef in their big one. Bash bash bash. Yuck yuck yuck.

Then back to a commercial break where once again I was convinced that I had to take a small loan and get a Rolex watch, accompanied by a MaccyD’s while relaxing on my new Harvey Norman sofa dreaming of ‘a Riviera. I have to mention the people who help with sailing on TV!

Zen! It’s great to see this boat spending time in front of a screen while our companion Bex Hornell, a RigPro rigger here in Auckland is a crew member on board. Discover 22 questions with Bex here>

Meanwhile… Scallywag was still sorting out their shit.

Scallywag - problems.

Scallywag – problems.

Eora, the two-handed Class 40 with Rupert Henry and Greg O’Shea on board, has airtime with the commentator saying… “she’s an interesting looking boat”. Dude, this thing will fly under the right conditions!

Eighty-seven women are on board the boats of the whole fleet, which is impressive to see. The once male dominated race is now open to almost anyone and everything. It will be open to everyone when Multihulls are allowed to race!

And just as we got back to a commercial break, we saw Scallywag hit the road with a bright orange jib flying up front. Massive disappointment for David Witt and his team – they wanted to own this race. However, there is still a long way to go and anything is possible in a Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race.

When we got back inside we saw the crew on the foredeck of Scallywag trying to get things done with their headsail, then a panoramic view of the fleet and the separation just 45 minutes from the 628 nm path.

A few more glimpses of some of the long-distance runners who are now settling in for a long night. The commentators weren’t sure what to talk about, so they started mentioning the names of the boats and then talked about the autopilot on the two-handed boats, which they are allowed to use but are unable to win. in the general classification.

We got a sneaky glimpse of Love and War aiming for their fourth IRC victory – they have a long race ahead of them but the boat is built for those kinds of conditions. Love & War won the Tattersall Cup in 1974, 1978 and 2006.

Early 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart.  Photo: Salty Goofy

Early 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart. Photo: Salty Goofy

At the end of the live stream, the entire fleet was on starboard. Gray clouds began to grow further with the building to the south. Punch.

The 76th cover of Rolex Sydney Hobart then practically came to an end, with a brooding melody setting the dark, dreary tone of what awaits the fleet. Things are going to get punchy!

And that’s pretty much how things turned out via the livestream which was available through the official site. Law Connect led the fleet with Back Jack, then an already beaten Scallywag.

Keep an eye on the official race tracker to watch the race unfold.

More race updates will be broadcast, so stay tuned to our website or subscribe to our newsletters and never miss a moment of browsing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=/D3_8QTJzZEA

Close


Source link

]]>
The story of two hands in the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race • Live Sail Die https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-story-of-two-hands-in-the-rolex-sydney-hobart-yacht-race-live-sail-die/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 23:09:56 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-story-of-two-hands-in-the-rolex-sydney-hobart-yacht-race-live-sail-die/ The Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race kicks off today at 1:00 p.m. Sydney time on December 26, 2021, with the warning signal expected at 1250 hours. Bruce Gould will have the honor of firing the cannon to signal the start after a gap year due to COVID-19 forcing the cancellation of the 2020 race. And […]]]>

The Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race kicks off today at 1:00 p.m. Sydney time on December 26, 2021, with the warning signal expected at 1250 hours.

Bruce Gould will have the honor of firing the cannon to signal the start after a gap year due to COVID-19 forcing the cancellation of the 2020 race. And this year there have been victims of covid even before the race. begins with Willow pulling the pin after three crew members test positive.

But let’s not let Covid take the limelight here.

Short-crew sailing is essentially a right of passage here in New Zealand. Everyone is in it, and almost every major sailor has a two-man race. It’s just the norm on this side of the ditch, and double-handed boats have as much chance of winning an overall race as full crews.

While we think it’s great that the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race finally has a two-man split, it looks like the big leap forward was just a small step aside. 18 boats, with just two sailors on board, are scheduled to start the race at 1:00 p.m. Sydney time today, December 26, 2021. However, these sailors are in a separate race and are not eligible for the race. overall handicap. win, which means the Tattersall Cup will go to a fully crewed boat.

Some may say “they can use the auto bar so they shouldn’t be eligible” and others may say “they have to work harder than a fully equipped team and therefore should have a chance to win”.

If the Rolex Sydney Hobart were a Kiwi event, then the 18 doubles crews would have the chance to win. Hell, they would even sail around multihulls used to all long-haul races in the land of the long white cloud.

So what do you think?

Should two-man boats be eligible for the final victory? Or should they just be happy that they can run?

Vote!

Want to watch the race on YouTube? Click here!

Header Image: The 75th Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race will start on December 26, 2019. Last year’s event was canceled due to the pandemic. Credit – Kurt Arrigo / Rolex, via Associated Press

A selection of photos of Andrea Francolini from six of the 18 two-man teams of the 2021 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race

Close


Source link

]]>
The Notice of Race for the Round Ireland Yacht Race 2022 is published (download it here!) https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-notice-of-race-for-the-round-ireland-yacht-race-2022-is-published-download-it-here/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 10:21:17 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/the-notice-of-race-for-the-round-ireland-yacht-race-2022-is-published-download-it-here/ With registration opening scheduled for January 24, 2022, the first formal document for the SSE Renewables Round Ireland 2022 race was taken with the publication of the Notice Of Race document (downloadable below) by the organizers of the Wicklow Sailing Club. The Notice of Race for the June 18 event sets out the classes to […]]]>

With registration opening scheduled for January 24, 2022, the first formal document for the SSE Renewables Round Ireland 2022 race was taken with the publication of the Notice Of Race document (downloadable below) by the organizers of the Wicklow Sailing Club.

The Notice of Race for the June 18 event sets out the classes to be raced, the handicap and grading system that will be used and the classes to which it will apply as well as any recent changes to offshore regulations that have occurred. significant changes as noted here.

The Irish Offshore Classic is the second longest race on the Royal Ocean Racing Club calendar. The first race took place in 1980 with only thirteen boats. Since then, organized every two years, the fleet has grown steadily, attracting a record 64 participants from all over the world.

A Mod 70 trimaran participating in the Round Ireland Race Photo: Afloat

There are a number of classes in IRC in which boats and their crews can compete, including IRC 1 – 4, class Z, ISORA, a “two class” and a team prize. The 2016 race saw the introduction of multihulls sailing under MOCRA rules. The 2018 race saw the introduction of a new Class40 category.

In the past, competing boats have ranged from an old 98-foot ’round-the-world’ maxi to one-third the size club boats, with all sizes in between.

As Afloat reported earlier, an international fleet is eyeing the Round Ireland Race as it also made the Class40 calendar thanks to the pioneering efforts of race organizer Kyran O’Gorman who promoted the race in France. .


Source link

]]>
Grenada Caribbean Sailing and Fishing Events in 2022 https://saltwaterconnections.org/grenada-caribbean-sailing-and-fishing-events-in-2022/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 12:20:36 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/grenada-caribbean-sailing-and-fishing-events-in-2022/ Grenada is launching a series of sailing and regatta events from December 2021, including the Atlantic Rally for ARC cruisers + Transatlantic Rally 2021 which just ended, until February 2022. With its white sand beaches, mountainous topography and tropical rainforests, Grenada, the Caribbean Spice Island, is recognized worldwide as a major draw for boating, yachting […]]]>

Grenada is launching a series of sailing and regatta events from December 2021, including the Atlantic Rally for ARC cruisers + Transatlantic Rally 2021 which just ended, until February 2022.

With its white sand beaches, mountainous topography and tropical rainforests, Grenada, the Caribbean Spice Island, is recognized worldwide as a major draw for boating, yachting and fishing events. Grenada has eight world-renowned marinas in the many bays and coves of this tropical paradise. Grenada’s location provides a secure anchorage and mooring for visiting yachts and charters during hurricane season, making insurance less expensive compared to other destinations.

Grenada’s main port, St. George, is a picturesque horseshoe-shaped bay where sea enthusiasts can cruise for above and below water excursions. The island’s pristine blue waters and colorful corals make the destination a snorkeling and scuba diving draw. More recently, Granada’s iconic Underwater Sculpture Park, innovatively designed to act like a coral reef, has been refurbished, providing an even more astonishing experience to see diverse marine life. The island hopping between the sister islands Carriacou and Petite Martinique is also a key attraction.

Atlantic Rally for ARC Cruisers + Transatlantic Rally 2021

The 2021 edition of the ARC Rally for Cruisers departed Las Palmas on November 21, 2021 and the last boat arrived at Camper & Nicholson Port Louis Superyacht Marina on December 13, 2021. There were 66 participating boats with 30 nationalities represented.

2022 Spice Island Swordfish Tournament

52sd The Republic Bank Spice Island Billfish tournament will be January 25-29, 2022, at the Granada Yacht Club. The Spice Island Billfish tournament began in 1964 for fishing enthusiasts and invites visitors to plan their trip to Grenada to participate. 25 boats registered to date from the Caribbean and the USA. http://sibtgd.com

Grenada Sailing Week 2022

Grenada’s premier sailing event, Grenada Sailing Week, will take place January 27-30, 2022 at the Yacht Club de la Petite Calivigny. The regatta will be a unique start to the regular weeklong regatta, with a mix of 3 days of traditional Grenada Sailing Week races and the PCYC Around the Island regatta. On the first day, participants will travel the 35 mile passage from Grand Anse, Grenada to Tyrell Bay, Carriacou. The second day will be a race around Carriacou, and the third day will be the return to Granada. www.grenadasailingweek.com

Royal Ocean Racing Club 2022 Transatlantic Race

The RORC Transatlantic Race is a high powered competitive global sailing event with a fleet of world class multihulls and monohulls scheduled to depart on January 8, 2022 from Puerto Calero, Lanzarote until January 29, 2022. The race from 3,000 nautical miles across the Atlantic to Camper & Nicholsons Port Louis Marina, Grenada, has a star-studded entry list of 29 racing yachts including teams from Austria, Cayman Islands, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the United States of America. http://rorc.org

Viking explorers ‘friendly’ transatlantic rally 2022

Viking Explorers Transatlantic Rally is the second edition in Granada and will take place late January / early February 2022. It is an exclusive and exciting family rally with a maximum of 25 boats with a small fleet and with the aim of creating a friendly environment for all ages. www.vikingexplorersrally.com/

In addition, Grenada Pentecost Regatta Petite Martinique is scheduled for May / June 2022, and the Carriacou Regatta for August 2022.

“We have had an interruption of events on the island due to the pandemic, and we are delighted to welcome back the sailing community who continue to choose Grenada as the destination of choice for their events,” said Petra Roach, CEO, Granada Tourism Authority.

“The nautical niche is where we have a competitive advantage and these events are a true testament to our island’s ability to offer extraordinary nautical experiences. “

As the holiday travel season begins and global vaccinations increase, Grenada has updated its Pure Safe Travel protocols.


Source link

]]>
Why Jimmy Spithill pushes to the limit in F1 sailing https://saltwaterconnections.org/why-jimmy-spithill-pushes-to-the-limit-in-f1-sailing/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 08:45:00 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/why-jimmy-spithill-pushes-to-the-limit-in-f1-sailing/ Sailing is now an extreme sport. Since 2013, high-tech foiled multihulls and monohulls have been used in the Americas Cup; the famous old contest in which Spithill made a legend by beating the USA by two victories. And they are also the boat of choice in SailGP; the reason Spithill is back on domestic water […]]]>

Sailing is now an extreme sport. Since 2013, high-tech foiled multihulls and monohulls have been used in the Americas Cup; the famous old contest in which Spithill made a legend by beating the USA by two victories.

And they are also the boat of choice in SailGP; the reason Spithill is back on domestic water this week in Sydney Harbor.

Jimmy Spithill’s US SailGP team trains during a practice session.Credit:Getty

Spithill, who grew up sailing on Pittwater, is the coxswain of Team USA in the Sydney stage of the SailGP World Series, in which eight nations compete on foiling catamarans for $ 1 million in a series of eight. stages around the world.

It was modeled after the Formula One series and all the rockstars of world sailing are involved.

Most of the frontmen are Australian. The man named Sailor of the Year in 2020, Tom Slingsby, helms the Australian boat (which won the inaugural series in 2019) and his compatriot Olympic champion Nathan Outteridge leads the Japanese team. With two innings to go in the 2021-22 season, Australia are ahead of the United States and Japan by one point.

The Australian SailGP Team F50, skippered by Tom Slingsby, flies over Sydney Harbor in 2019.

The Australian SailGP Team F50, skippered by Tom Slingsby, flies over Sydney Harbor in 2019. Credit:

Which means races will be tight on the six-race schedule Friday and Saturday. Particularly on the second day, when the forecast wind over the harbor could push riders to “high end” speeds, explains Spithill.

“The boats will fly,” he adds.

“We are going into really narrow and confined areas. We will be on a narrow race track near Shark Island there and in one of the races Shark Island will be in the middle, like an obstacle. We have side limits, and with eight of these things going around, up to almost 100 km / h, things go fast, races are about 12 minutes long.

“It’s very physical, very fast, and it’s high risk.”

The comparisons to F1 are deliberate and after a captivating end to the motorsport version this week, they are also timely. But Spithill believes that hurtling catamarans are actually the superior product.

“I’m biased, but I actually think it’s better than Formula 1,” he said.

The SailGP F50 catamaran fleet in action during a training race.

The SailGP F50 catamaran fleet in action during a training race.

“The reason we all use the same equipment. When you watch Formula 1, let’s face it, it was a two-car race and the rest of the field isn’t really lucky.

“These boats are the equivalents of Formula 1 on the water, they are constantly improved by the technical team and the design team. But the difference is that everyone gets the upgrades at the same time. There is no technical advantage and the best team will win. There are no excuses.

Loading

“The other thing is we share data. Obviously, in the Formula 1 and America’s Cup programs, it’s intellectual property, you hide it. You would never let go of that. But with the Oracle data cloud, everything is open. You can see everything and analyze everything your competition is doing.

The races are centered on Shark Island, but the home advantage will be largely neutralized with so many Australians on the pitch and Englishman Ben Ainslie, who won an Olympic gold medal in Sydney Harbor in 2000. Most of the best dogs have won a Sydney to Hobart or two, too.

“The other thing with the harbor too, it can be a very vibrant place, especially around this area of ​​Shark Island,” Spithill said.

“But at the end of the day, the level in this league is so high and everyone has the same equipment, so any team can win. It’s just a matter of minimizing errors.

“You have eight things loading around the track. Half the time, you’re just trying to avoid them.

SailGP explained

Program

There are five fleet races, with all the teams, and one final, with the top three teams.

Friday: 4 p.m.-6 p.m.

Saturday: 4 p.m.-6 p.m.

Domain

Australia – Tom Slingsby (coxswain)

United States – Jimmy Spithill

Japan – Nathan Outteridge

England – Ben Ainslie

New Zealand – Peter Burling

Spain – Phil Robertson

Denmark – Nicolai Sehested

France – Quentin Delapierre


Source link

]]>
Sunreef’s new “super catamaran” is 140 feet of pure luxury https://saltwaterconnections.org/sunreefs-new-super-catamaran-is-140-feet-of-pure-luxury/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 03:31:51 +0000 https://saltwaterconnections.org/sunreefs-new-super-catamaran-is-140-feet-of-pure-luxury/ The famous Polish shipyard Sunreef has been continuously producing new, fully customizable high-end multihull models since 2002. Sunreef’s latest is no exception: a new sailboat, known simply as the Sunreef 140 and oh boy, is this is a doozy. Incorporating a huge living space and a number of unique technical features, this sailboat continues to […]]]>

The famous Polish shipyard Sunreef has been continuously producing new, fully customizable high-end multihull models since 2002. Sunreef’s latest is no exception: a new sailboat, known simply as the Sunreef 140 and oh boy, is this is a doozy.

Incorporating a huge living space and a number of unique technical features, this sailboat continues to push the boundaries of marine design. As the name suggests, the Sunreef 140 stretches just under 140 feet, which prompted the shipyard to nickname it a “super catamaran”. In other words, it manages to combine the comfort and size of a superyacht with the sleek silhouette and clean lines of a classic catamaran.

Similar to the previous six models in Sunreef’s sail range, the new Sunreef 140 features wind-harnessing rigging, capable of both supplementing propulsion and improving the efficiency of traditional diesel and electric engines. If the idea of ​​low emissions excites you here, you also have the option of adding Sunreef’s proprietary solar power system that works to power the ship’s equipment with zero emissions energy. Like everything else you’ll find here, it’s also fully customizable.



RELATED: Sunreef’s 80ft catamaran is essentially a luxury haven

Unlike its predecessors, however, the Sunreef 140 has a new feature in the stern of the ship. The aft cockpit, according to Sunreef, is one of the yacht’s most notable features, thanks to the large garage below which offers space for two large jet skis and a refueling station. The flybridge, meanwhile, is equipped with a bar, dining table and spa flanked by sunbeds.

With a living and dining area for outdoor entertaining, Sunreef was also able to find room within 140 feet for a nifty folding platform that connects the two separate hulls. This feature gives you an expansive beach club, complete with your own lounge chairs and a diving platform. This beach club then flows into a gym with a storage room for snorkel gear and water toys. How good is this.

sunreef 140 outdoor 02

As for the interior, there is accommodation for up to 12 people, but the full-width owner’s suite definitely takes the cake. With panoramic views, as well as private access to the spa and lounge on the front patio, there will certainly be no questions about the owner of this damn thing.


Source link

]]>