What to do in a shark attack and why sharks attack

It’s something we all think about when we enter the ocean. What’s in the water and how far away are the sharks? Although attacks are rare, Volusia County currently holds the title of the world’s shark bite capital. Shark experts explain the science behind these frightening encounters. Fascinated by sharks from a young age, Toby Daly-Engle directs Florida Tech’s Shark Conservation Lab. He believes that the fear of the majestic fish is detached from reality. “Sharks are the ultimate unknown. And when people are afraid of sharks, it’s really that unknown that they’re afraid,” Daly-Engel said. “It’s not the reality of a shark encounter that’s astronomically rare. It’s that possibility, it’s that fear – kind of like we love horror movies.” Those apex predators that are pre-dinosaurs lived so long because they are extremely cautious with their prey.” The normal protocol for shark hunting is to bite the prey and back away. the shark can get in and feed,” Daly-Engel said. This is one of the main reasons most people bitten by sharks only suffer nicks or cuts on their legs or feet. More than 97% survive. One of the best things to do if you’re in that rare moment of a shark encounter can surprise you.” So hitting an animal in the face is a pretty good sign that you can actually hurt that creature. and could somehow tip the scales. of the pros and cons of this encounter for the shark,” Daly-Engel said. eyes or gills “Because we are not their prey, but we are in their environment,” Daly-Engel said.If you happen to encounter one, “should I say where should I go” moment, don’t move quickly while splashing or swimming. This mimics injured marine life that is their natural prey. Stay calm, and if you’re in shallow water, stand up. Something their usual prey can’t do . But are the number of attacks increasing? Yes, but only slightly.”In 2021, at the height of COVID, one of the only people could go was the beach. And so we saw a lot of bathers on the beach, so there were more shark encounters,” Daly-Engel said. We’ve heard the deep science behind why these attacks or encounters happen: curious sharks, mistaken identity, etc. away from their main food source, which is fish of all sizes. So if you see someone fishing on the beach, on a boat or on a pier, keep walking before you hit the waves. In fact, a spokesperson for Brevard Ocean Rescue said lifeguards will alert swimmers if they see large schools of baitfish nearby before they even spot any sharks. In his more than 20 years as a fishing boat captain, Chris Cameron of Fired Up Charters has seen plenty of sharks both on the reel and trying to eat what’s on his reel. “You’ll get hooked and start reeling them – sharks. And sometimes you’ll see sharks coming in, nibbling as they approach the boat,” Cameron said. He saw a greater variety of sharks and more of them. “Of course you see one swimming. ‘Oh, there’s a shark. Oh, there’s a shark. I hope they chew that day,'” Cameron said. so they’re not man-eaters. They’re not just eating everything.” And one thing to keep in mind: Statistically, you’re more likely to be killed while shopping on Black Friday than a shark attack.

It’s something we all think about when we enter the ocean. What’s in the water and how far away are the sharks?

Although attacks are rare, Volusia County currently holds the title of shark bite capital of the world.

Shark experts explain the science behind these chilling encounters.

Fascinated by sharks from a young age, Toby Daly-Engle runs Florida Tech’s Shark Conservation Lab. He believes that the fear of the majestic fish is detached from reality.

“Sharks are the ultimate unknown. And when people are afraid of sharks, it’s really that unknown that they’re afraid,” Daly-Engel said. “It’s not the reality of a shark encounter that’s astronomically rare. It’s that possibility, it’s that fear — kind of like we love horror movies.

These apex predators that predate the dinosaurs lived so long because they are extremely cautious with their prey.

“Normal protocol for hunting sharks is to bite the prey and back off. And the prey will bleed and become weak. Then the shark can come in and feed,” Daly-Engel said.

This is one of the main reasons why most people bitten by sharks only suffer nicks or cuts on their legs or feet. More than 97% survive.

One of the best things to do if you’re in that rare moment of a shark encounter can surprise you.

“So hitting an animal in the face is a pretty good sign that you can actually hurt that creature and could kind of tip the balance of the pros and cons in this encounter for the shark,” Daly-Engel said.

The best place to direct these blows is the edge of the nose area where the sharks sensitive sensory organs are located. Don’t go for the eyes or the gills.

According to scientists, most attacks are cases of mistaken identity.

“Because we are not their prey, but we are in their environment,” Daly-Engel said.

If you happen to come across one that says “should I say or should I leave”, don’t move quickly splashing or swimming. This mimics injured marine life that is their natural prey. Stay calm and if you are in shallow water, stand up. Something their usual prey can’t do.

But are the number of attacks really increasing? Yes, but only slightly.

“In 2021, at the height of COVID, one of the only places people could go was the beach. And so we saw a lot of bathers at the beach, so there was a lot more encounters with sharks,” Daly-Engel said.

We’ve heard the in-depth science on why these attacks or encounters happen: curious sharks, mistaken identity, etc.

Stay away from their primary food source, which is fish of all sizes. So if you see someone fishing on the beach, on a boat or on a pier, keep walking before you hit the waves.

In fact, a spokesperson for Brevard Ocean Rescue said lifeguards will alert swimmers if they see large schools of baitfish nearby before they even spot any sharks.

In his more than 20 years as a fishing boat captain, Chris Cameron of Fired Up Charters has seen plenty of sharks both on the reel and trying to eat what was on his reel.

“You’ll hook up and start reeling them – sharks. And sometimes you’ll see sharks coming in, nibbling as they approach the boat,” Cameron said.

He saw a greater variety of sharks and more of them.

“Yes, you see one swimming. ‘Oh, there’s a shark. Oh, there’s a shark.’ Hopefully they chew that day,” Cameron said. “They’re very finicky, so they’re not man-eaters. They don’t just start eating everything.”

And one thing to keep in mind: Statistically, you’re more likely to be killed while shopping on Black Friday than a shark attack.

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